1
   

Autodidactism vs. The Education System

 
 
Reply Fri 8 Jan, 2010 09:17 am
This is my first post but it's an interesting thought (to me at least).

So I'm in the middle of revising for various exams (AS level re-takes actually, as I find the art of revision so hard to commit to), and what I find peculiar is the way in which the moment an exam is set for a subject that I find interesting, the pressure of the exam immediately seems to make me lose interest in the subject.
I'm still only young (17), but I am interested in and throughout my life would like to learn about all sorts of different subject areas (Philosophy, Sociology, Geography, Literature, Theology, Physics etc.), yet I find that if I have learnt something through autodidactism (self-teaching) I find it so much more fulfilling and interesting. I'm not sure what it is about the education/exam system that puts me off of subject areas, it seems that the pressure of having to learn about something makes me put in less effort than if I were to learn about something that I myself want to learn about, or that I have an interest in learning about. I'm not sure if I'm peculiar in feeling this way or if it is a common idea (I'm sure it's been expressed a thousand times before), but my basic argument is 'would we all be better off if the education/exam system did not exist, and we instead learned through our own determination or interest in a particular subject?'
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 2,302 • Replies: 5
No top replies

 
jgweed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jan, 2010 10:38 am
@JamesMills,
I would suggest that the opposite view has merit as well:---first because life always has pressures, schedules, and timetables and education should prepare you for life, a major aspect of which is self-discipline; second, because even a sound mind left alone to follow pathways of its own predilection can often result in very peculiar and narrow perspectives; third because a civilised life seems to presuppose an acquaintance with many different areas of knowledge and a grounding in its significant episodes and themes.

A mind without a civilised background is not only isolated, but unprotected.
Karpowich
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 05:19 am
@jgweed,
I tend to find the same sentiments true about the education system and autodidactism, yet also see the necessity of having an examination style method of teaching. Our world is run off of standards, and these standards have to some how be measured. If you visited a tax specialist and he told you that his qualifications measured up to 3 years of reading books from the library and 5 years of reading articles on Google, more than likely you will find another specialist. The examination system is put in place so people can be assured of the qualifications of the people that run their lives. Would you vote in a presidential candidate if that candidate was a farmer whose hobby it was to read CNN and Fox every 2 hours and debate on forums what he thought about the world? Most likely not. So while I don't think we should discourage autodidactism, we by no means should embrace it to the point where it becomes the standard of education.
0 Replies
 
prothero
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 07:38 pm
@JamesMills,
How would one determine whether you really had mastered the subject area say for employment or higher educational purposes except through examination?
I think the idea of self motivation and self learning is fine but there still needs to be some method of assesment or accountablity?
0 Replies
 
Leonard
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 09:37 pm
@JamesMills,
The quote "I will never let my schooling interfere with my education" by Mark Twain may be an example of this feeling. After all, it is difficult to condense even the basics of something like philosophy into one or two small semesters, and this pressure makes it impossible to extract some joy from learning. As a slow learner myself I can attest to that. It seems redundant to express dislike in having to learn this way but to someone who finds the subject interesting and not just a necessity it would make sense to say that.
0 Replies
 
bmcreider
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 10:17 pm
@JamesMills,
I prefer autodidactism - but can see why it would never be accepted in a capitalist type, Western society for anything to do with money (paying or hiring any smart guy, like me, with no educational credentials is a rare move for any job requiring "skills" - despite non-work experience).
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
DOES NOTHING EXIST??? - Question by mark noble
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Autodidactism vs. The Education System
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 10/21/2019 at 09:04:44