Reply Thu 27 May, 2010 08:11 pm
I am struggling to understand why a native English speaker can understand the word long, but not the Italian word for long, lungo. Both words share the same meaning, so where does the difference lie?
Long is an easy word.

Riprovevole vs. Reprehensible
Again both the same meaning. Is there a difference because with reprehensible we can describe it with words we are familiar with? Do we not know words in other languages because we are not exposed to them as often?
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Reconstructo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 12:23 am
@mister kitten,
mister kitten;169806 wrote:

Again both the same word. Is there a difference because with reprehensible we can describe it with words we are familiar with? Do we not know words in other languages because we are not exposed to them as often?


I think it's that simple. I learned a bit of German and read certain phrases as with what I considered the proper emotion, and it was great. I felt it. But I suppose it takes exposure exposure exposure. Personally, if "lungo" was sprinkled among English words in a likely context, I think I would take it for "long."
0 Replies
 
jgweed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 04:40 am
@mister kitten,
You can make a guess at a foreign word, for example lungo for long, if you have some context in which to do it, but until you learn the language, it remains a guess. Many French words, for example, closely resemble English since the words derive from a common source, e.g. Latin, or are borrowed from one another; but the French word "car" does not mean automobile.

Knowing a foreign language means: being able to translate the foreign word into a word in English (and that you understand the English word in the first place). Know it well means: being able to understand and translate the nuances of one language to another. This explains why many are able to translate French newspapers, but few French poetry, into English.
Soul Brother
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 07:44 am
@jgweed,
I think pronunciation is also a crucial factor, some words can be spelt extremely similar in both languages, however when they are pronounced they sound very different, for example lungo is very recognizable to the English spelling of lungo, however when lungo is pronounced in english it is not so recognizable to the way it is pronounced in Italian.

Personally, being able to speak a latin language makes it extremely easy to understand other latin languages as they are all very similar. I would say that Italian is more similar and comprehensible to spanish as they share similar pronunciation, and french shares more with portuguese in pronunciation.
VideCorSpoon
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 10:02 am
@Soul Brother,
mister kitten;169806 wrote:
I am struggling to understand why a native English speaker can understand the word long, but not the Italian word for long, lungo. Both words share the same meaning, so where does the difference lie?
Long is an easy word.

Riprovevole vs. Reprehensible
Again both the same word. Is there a difference because with reprehensible we can describe it with words we are familiar with? Do we not know words in other languages because we are not exposed to them as often?
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 10:39 am
@mister kitten,
mister kitten;169806 wrote:
I am struggling to understand why a native English speaker can understand the word long, but not the Italian word for long, lungo. Both words share the same meaning, so where does the difference lie?
Long is an easy word.

Riprovevole vs. Reprehensible
Again both the same word. Is there a difference because with reprehensible we can describe it with words we are familiar with? Do we not know words in other languages because we are not exposed to them as often?


They are patently not the same word. They may look the same to some. Why would you say they are? Why would not a native English speaker think that "lungo" means "lung" in English. Indeed, it looks at least as much like "lung" as it does, "long". Maybe more so, in fact!
mister kitten
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 02:49 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;170023 wrote:
They are patently not the same word. They may look the same to some. Why would you say they are? Why would not a native English speaker think that "lungo" means "lung" in English. Indeed, it looks at least as much like "lung" as it does, "long". Maybe more so, in fact!

The words mean the same idea, but they are not the same in pronunciation/spelling (most of the time).
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 03:31 pm
@mister kitten,
mister kitten;170098 wrote:
The words mean the same idea, but they are not the same in pronunciation/spelling (most of the time).


So why your question?
mister kitten
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 04:36 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;170110 wrote:
So why your question?

I didn't start with a question specifically about words and their meaning; I started with a question: why is it difficult to learn words of the same meaning?
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 07:03 pm
@mister kitten,
mister kitten;170146 wrote:
I didn't start with a question specifically about words and their meaning; I started with a question: why is it difficult to learn words of the same meaning?


As for instance?
TuringEquivalent
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 May, 2010 07:16 pm
@mister kitten,
mister kitten;169806 wrote:
I am struggling to understand why a native English speaker can understand the word long, but not the Italian word for long, lungo. Both words share the same meaning, so where does the difference lie?
Long is an easy word.

Riprovevole vs. Reprehensible
Again both the same meaning. Is there a difference because with reprehensible we can describe it with words we are familiar with? Do we not know words in other languages because we are not exposed to them as often?


Suppose the meaning of X is Y?
Don ` t we have to ask the meaning of Y?
Don` t we start an infinite regress when we as the meaning of X, is Y, and the meaning of Y is Z....etc?
If we stop the regress, then we reach a conclusion that meaning must be atomic.
0 Replies
 
mister kitten
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 May, 2010 02:28 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;170187 wrote:
As for instance?

I gave two examples-go to the op.

Words such as avocational (I don't know what it means). We can understand that word and use it in a sentence if we wanted, but some word in another language, like 'edificio' (building..not the verb), we would have trouble with...why?
0 Replies
 
jgweed
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 09:20 am
@mister kitten,
Isn't having trouble with a definition the same with words in English or Italian, and isn't the solution the same in both cases?

We come across a word we don't know, perhaps we read it for the first time, perhaps we only have a very vague knowledge of its meaning (from guessing when we have seen it before) but it now becomes important to know more about its meaning (s).

Initially, we learn words in a foreign language by making a table of words on the right and its equivalent on the left, always remembering that on both sides the words are not precisely the same but similar, and that both have all sorts of shades of meaning depending on the context.
0 Replies
 
Night Ripper
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 10:01 am
@mister kitten,
mister kitten;169806 wrote:
I am struggling to understand why a native English speaker can understand the word long, but not the Italian word for long, lungo. Both words share the same meaning, so where does the difference lie?
Long is an easy word.

Riprovevole vs. Reprehensible
Again both the same meaning. Is there a difference because with reprehensible we can describe it with words we are familiar with? Do we not know words in other languages because we are not exposed to them as often?


The difference is in how the meaning of "long" is triggered. The meaning is only triggered by certain symbols and phrases we have learned. For example, if you know sign language then the meaning of "long" can be triggered by some arm movements.
0 Replies
 
 

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