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Is law itself tempting to break?

 
 
Reply Sat 9 May, 2009 08:33 pm
I think that one of the main reason's people break the law, is because law is law and you are not allowed to break it. Sometimes people disobey the law only because they are not allowed to therefore making it naturally tempting. Even if the law breaking has no negative value, it is still defiant and tempting. Does this have any value?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 668 • Replies: 5
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Yogi DMT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 May, 2009 05:33 pm
@Yogi DMT,
People tend to want things they can't have. What you can't have or do makes it naturally more desirable even if normally the action wouldn't be something you would do.
Krumple
 
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Reply Mon 11 May, 2009 08:17 pm
@Yogi DMT,
Yogi,

In some cases yes the motivation is to break it because it is a law but it is not universal. Not everyone does this or has such a motivation, some people might break certain laws because they are ridiculously restricting, such as speed limits.

A person could technically speed and not cause harm yet they are found to be guilty of a crime. These are victimless crimes and really do nothing but generate taxes for government. If the government really was concerned over safety they could easily place restrictions into car computers to prevent going over a certain speed on a certain road. But the law seems to be in place not to prevent tragedies but instead to make money so the law enforcement knows and even expects people to break it.

Other laws like, do not murder have a roll in providing a more secure or safe environment for people to conduct their lives. If your statement were true then people would want to murder solely on the premise that there is a law against it. This surely is not the case. People mostly kill for money or money related issues. Occasionally it is in self defense or out of some sort of hatred or anger but typically financial reasons. I would include accidents but we don't consider them premeditated or reactionary murder such as negligence. Anyways, I have never heard a guilty plea of, "Well I killed because there was a law against killing so I just wanted to break it, to break it."
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No0ne
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 May, 2009 08:21 pm
@Yogi DMT,
Yogi DMT wrote:
I think that one of the main reason's people break the law, is because law is law and you are not allowed to break it. Sometimes people disobey the law only because they are not allowed to therefore making it naturally tempting. Even if the law breaking has no negative value, it is still defiant and tempting. Does this have any value?


If I take away your glass of water, would you not want it back? How are the dynamics of these two questions related to the dynamics of your statement?
GoshisDead
 
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Reply Mon 11 May, 2009 08:25 pm
@No0ne,
Are you trying to propose that there is such thing as human nature? If so that idea tends to either be scoffed at or ignored in these here parts lol.
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Yogi DMT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 May, 2009 09:22 pm
@Yogi DMT,
I was writing a nice post in response but my computer blue-creened and i got to get off so i'm gonna have to keep this short, eventually i'll post more.

My thoughts on the subject: Law is tempting to break even if it is not at the expense of others, it's just something we desire because we can't have it or can't no it even if its not for a specific reason. If the government decided to make baseball illegal for no reason at all, would it not be more tempting to play?
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