1
   

Is this a question?

 
 
Reply Sun 27 Jul, 2008 04:58 am
"Is this a question?"


I think it is a question, because you are asking if it it is a question and questions need answering so even though the question is on questions, it's still a question.

PS: I know it's tempting, but please don't go "is this an answer?" because it isn't its just another question.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,471 • Replies: 16
No top replies

 
Aristoddler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jul, 2008 07:05 am
@one-philosophy,
In what context is it being used?
Is it followed by a question? If that's the case, then it's a matter of poor punctuation...it should read "Is this a question; Do birds fly south in Antarctica when winter comes?"

If it follows a statement, then yes it's a question in it's own.
Victor Eremita
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jul, 2008 05:55 pm
@Aristoddler,
What is this "this" referring to? If this "this" refers to nothing, then no; because nothing is not a question.

If this is referring to the aforementioned statement (itself), then it can be worded to be clearly self-referential as "Is this sequence of eight words a question?" or some such.
one-philosophy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 12:50 am
@Victor Eremita,
the "this" within the statement is refering to the statement itself of "is this a question?"
Its self refering.
But I ask, why can't it be a question?
Surely because it is self-refering, does not mean it is poor grammered?
It meets the criteria of what a question is. It's ended with a question mark and it can be answered such with a correct or incorrect variable (yes or no).
If I was to say:
"Explain why this is not a question." ('this' being self-referent) then it is clear that this is not a question at all but rather a command.

"I can't believe this is not a question!" Is not a question either but an exlamation. I.e, just a statement.
english is so confusing
Didymos Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 01:16 am
@one-philosophy,
Quote:
Is this a question?
If you are asking something, yes. I think Aristoddler is right. It's all about context.

English is a confusing language. The up side is that most native speakers have a pretty poor understanding of the language.
FatalMuse
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 04:01 am
@Didymos Thomas,
Yes, because any sentence with a question mark on the end is a question?
one-philosophy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 11:36 am
@FatalMuse,
I think that if a statement has a question mark on the end, it does not necessarilly mean it is a question?

^That example ^ is poor grammer. But the question proposed asks if it is a question in itself and that inherent fact must make it a question in its own right ... surely?
0 Replies
 
GoshisDead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 11:49 am
@one-philosophy,
Is it a question? I don't know. You asked it.
Aristoddler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 01:16 pm
@GoshisDead,
If I'm holding a rock and ask, "Is this a question?" then the answer is "No, it is a rock."
one-philosophy
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Jul, 2008 01:44 pm
@Aristoddler,
But if I have a sheet of paper with the words "what is the name of the presedent of the USA?" (for example) can I hold it and say "is this a question?"
The question in itself is self reffering so effectively I am asking:

Is the statement "is this a question?" A question?
Zetetic11235
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Jul, 2008 07:16 pm
@one-philosophy,
This statement is false.-Kurt Godel. Much more interesting in my opinion, however:

"Is this sentence a question?" That is the correct form, there is no indication for the pronoun's meaning otherwise.

S=the sentence F()=property of being a question E: =there exists.

E:F(S)v~E: F(S)=Either there exists a sentence with form S having the property of a question, or there doesn't, it either is or isn't, and you are asking for a response, so it is.
one-philosophy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2008 04:27 am
@Zetetic11235,
when you say it it does sound like a qustion, and yourright about Godels.
If the statement is false then he is telling the truth in which case it is not false, but if it is not false it inherently is. A loop of gramatical programming I call it. I also think of them as half lies.
If robots invade the world like the terminator and the matrix, what is so hard about telling them the statement:

"I am telling you a lie".

The robots brain in theory should go *fosizzle*
Zetetic11235
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2008 10:42 pm
@one-philosophy,
Their greatest ally is with the ever broadening Fuzzy logic! It will strike fear in to the hearts of those who fear it! Disturbe the tranquility of those who fret about it!
close shut forever the door of human freedom and bind us to the will of the probability engine of our creation! DOOM TO ALL WHO ARE DOOMED!
0mg khaos
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Aug, 2008 07:18 am
@Zetetic11235,
A few simple questions to ask yourself which should lead you to an answer. They are designed to be YES or NO.

1) Can something either BE or NOT BE a sentance?
2) Is "Is this a question?" a sentance?
3) Can a sentance either BE or NOT BE a question?
4) Is "Is this a question?" a question?
5) Does it invite a direct response?

If YES to all then it couldn't possibly be anything but a question.
-------------------------------------------------------------
After determining it is infact a sentance (verb, noun etc...) you need to determine the nature of sentance it is.

It is inviting a response, has a question mark and has a subject (namely its self), so I argue that it is a question. In which case I would simply answer "yes". If you disagree with me then you will find your only option is to respond with "no", in which case you are by default acknologing it as a question and treating it like one by answering. And as it either is a question or it isn't a question, and claiming it to not be a question would be none sensical then your only option is to accept it as a question.

However, as it is its own content then I argue is just a meaningless sentance.
0 Replies
 
Caleb
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Apr, 2009 08:47 pm
@Aristoddler,
Aristoddler wrote:
In what context is it being used?
Is it followed by a question? If that's the case, then it's a matter of poor punctuation...it should read "Is this a question; Do birds fly south in Antarctica when winter comes?"

If it follows a statement, then yes it's a question in it's own.


How about this one.... Is this a question; Is this a question?
0 Replies
 
ACB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Apr, 2009 01:27 pm
@Aristoddler,
Aristoddler wrote:
Is it followed by a question? If that's the case, then it's a matter of poor punctuation...it should read "Is this a question; Do birds fly south in Antarctica when winter comes?"


Not quite right. As there are two questions, you need two question marks, but the inclusion of the word 'this' makes that difficult, so I would say:

"Is 'Do birds fly south in Antarctica when winter comes?' a question?"

Similarly:

"Is 'Is this a question?' a question?"

And the answer in both cases is 'yes'. In the second example, 'this' (if nothing else has been mentioned) refers to the whole group of words in single quotes.
0 Replies
 
sheeps
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2009 10:00 am
@one-philosophy,
If a question is a true question, then the end of the question is infact the beginning of the answer.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Is this a question?
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/23/2020 at 11:09:39