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Language and Literature and Identity

 
 
Kooker
 
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2008 01:51 pm
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,043 • Replies: 3
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boagie
 
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Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2008 03:03 pm
@Kooker,
Kooker wrote:


kooker,Smile

:)Actually, when one is stripped of personal identity one is left with the self, personal identity is I think govern by experience; so, language would be elemental in creating evaluations of said experience. Personal identity is limited to its experience. The essence of what you are is the self, and the self is undiffreniated from any other self, or as the Upanishads put it, "The Self In One, Is The Self In All" The individual as personal identity could only arise through the selfs journey through the world of experience. Realising personal identity as an abstract concept, an illusion, is to become self-realized.
Kooker
 
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Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2008 03:30 pm
@boagie,
I like that very much, thank you.

Experience is inherent to identity--but how are you to express the experience in a way that is particular to yourself? If I experience the loss of a loved one, how do I encapsulate /my/ loss and not just /a/ loss (that is, we all experience loss, but these losses are particular to our individual feeling). Through metaphor, or poetry, I think. And therein lies the creation--or realization, of a "self."

Quote:
Upanishads put it, "The Self In One, Is The Self In All"


Read in the above context--the loss in one, is the loss in all; the greatest poetry is universal, or "In All," yet it is particular to that poets feeling, or "In One." A paradoxical convergence.

More stuff for me to mull on, thanks for the post.
boagie
 
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Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2008 04:17 pm
@Kooker,
Kooker wrote:
I like that very much, thank you.

Experience is inherent to identity--but how are you to express the experience in a way that is particular to yourself? If I experience the loss of a loved one, how do I encapsulate /my/ loss and not just /a/ loss (that is, we all experience loss, but these losses are particular to our individual feeling). Through metaphor, or poetry, I think. And therein lies the creation--or realization, of a "self."



Read in the above context--the loss in one, is the loss in all; the greatest poetry is universal, or "In All," yet it is particular to that poets feeling, or "In One." A paradoxical convergence.

More stuff for me to mull on, thanks for the post.


kooker,

We are not really at odds with each other on this, your statement reminds me of a saying by Carl Jung, that to speak in universals is to speak with a thousand voices. Being an individual is not a unique experience, it is in fact common. If one speaks however in the voice of self confession, of most particular woes, it will reach the heart of a limited number of people, speak in universals concerning the human condition and you have the world's ear--to speak in universals is to expand your concept of the self, which embraces all of humanity, past, present and future. I am glad you liked my previous response, such a positive response, thank you as well!!
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