Reply Sun 21 Oct, 2007 08:10 pm
A list of Plato's Works Online For Easy Reference:


Apology
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Charmides, or Temperance
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Cratylus
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Critias
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Crito
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Euthydemus
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Euthyphro
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett


Gorgias
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Ion
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Laches, or Courage
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett



Laws
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Lysis, or Friendship
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Meno
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Parmenides
Written 370 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Phaedo
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Phaedrus
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Philebus
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Protagoras
Written 380 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett



The Republic
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett


The Seventh Letter
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by J. Harward

Sophist
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Statesman
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Symposium
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Theaetetus
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Timaeus
Written 360 B.C.E
Translated by Benjamin Jowett
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 3,742 • Replies: 10
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Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jun, 2008 07:55 pm
@Pythagorean,
The list is incomplete.

Alcibiades
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Hippias Major
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Hippias Minor
Translated by Benjamin Jowett

Menexenus
Translated by Benjamin Jowett
VideCorSpoon
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Jun, 2008 09:07 pm
@Theaetetus,
Benjamin Jowett has apparently been very busy...
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Jul, 2008 01:07 pm
@VideCorSpoon,
VideCorSpoon wrote:
Benjamin Jowett has apparently been very busy...


Was very busy. Jowett translated the entire Plato collection including some spurious works attributed to Plato during the 19th Century.

An interesting side note...Alcibiades was considered spurious until recent history. I think the humor in the dialogue threw the scholars in the past for a loop and they agreed that no way something with that much humor could have been written by Plato.
midas77
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jul, 2008 03:16 am
@Theaetetus,
Theaetetus wrote:
Was very busy. Jowett translated the entire Plato collection including some spurious works attributed to Plato during the 19th Century.

An interesting side note...Alcibiades was considered spurious until recent history. I think the humor in the dialogue threw the scholars in the past for a loop and they agreed that no way something with that much humor could have been written by Plato.


So maybe they thought it was from Aristotle? Humor me. Hahaha
Holiday20310401
 
  1  
Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2008 06:06 pm
@midas77,
Just a quick question I thought somebody might be able to answer. Is there a feud between Socrates and Plato. Why was Socrates always about to be executed in Plato's works.
midas77
 
  1  
Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2008 06:29 pm
@Holiday20310401,
Plato is one of the avid followers of Socrates. It is important to note that almost everything we know about Socrates comes from Plato. Plato's writing comes in a form of Dialogue. Almost always Socrates serves as a mouthpiece for Plato's Doctrine, so it is sometimes to difficult to differentiate the original thoughts of Socrates from that of Plato.

I'm not entirely sure how many times the impending death of Socrates was used as background of Dialogues. I'm sure of these works however.

Apology - It is actually a "monologue", it is Socrates' defense of his own trial.
Crito - Socrates was offered a chance of escape, but he declined the offer.
Phaedo - Sorates last word before he drink "hemlock"
de Silentio
 
  1  
Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2008 07:25 pm
@midas77,
midas77 wrote:

Apology - It is actually a "monologue", it is Socrates' defense of his own trial.
Crito - Socrates was offered a chance of escape, but he declined the offer.
Phaedo - Sorates last word before he drink "hemlock"


The Euthyphro is a dialogue that takes place when Socrates is in line at the court house to get the details on his trial. It usually comes before the list you made in the classic "Trial and Death of Socrates".

This dialogue contains the famous: Is something pious because God commands it, or does God command it because it is pious.
Deftil
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Aug, 2008 01:50 am
@de Silentio,
If anyone is interested in audio of some of Plato's works,

LibriVox The Apology of Socrates, by Plato

LibriVox Euthyphro by Plato

LibriVox Ion, by Plato


LibriVox is pretty cool for audiobooks. :knight:
0 Replies
 
midas77
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Aug, 2008 05:42 am
@de Silentio,
de Silentio wrote:
The Euthyphro is a dialog that takes place when Socrates is in line at the court house to get the details on his trial. It usually comes before the list you made in the classic "Trial and Death of Socrates".

Thank you for the observation de Silentio. I was aware of this before I post but decided not too, for purely whimsical reason, that the number three seems to be always enough for me, besides I have not yet had a chance to read this Dialogue in full. My apology for my arbitrary removal of Euthyphro.
de Silentio wrote:

This dialog contains the famous: Is something pious because God commands it, or does God command it because it is pious.

Just wondering did Socrates gave a definite answer here, or is it just the same "flimsical" way most of the Dialogues end?
de Silentio
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Aug, 2008 11:09 am
@midas77,
midas77 wrote:
Just wondering did Socrates gave a definite answer here, or is it just the same "flimsical" way most of the Dialogues end?


I don't think Socrates ever gives an answer. As he said himself, he isn't capable of producing the possitve.

All he did in this dialogue was show that Euthyphro had no idea what piety was, and if Euthyprho, a renowned priest, doesn't know what piety is, how are the judges or his accusers going to know. Two devices that Socrates uses in his discussions are Ignorance of Definition and Contradiction. Euthyprho falls victim to both (and rather quickly).
0 Replies
 
 

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