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Why euthanasia should be legalized

 
 
Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 05:00 pm
@Ragman,
Quote:
Australia and US clearly are at a different points with the law.
I would be very surprised if that turns out to be the case. We have different laws and we approach the end result from a different starting point, but the net result is the same. I know of several lawyers who have passed the bar exams in several Australian and USA states, and they say whilst the wording does differ and the framework differs, the result is the same.
Quote:
The serious issue I have with it is whom (of the involved parties) decides what terminally ill patient can be allowed to die (assisted) - the doctors, patient (if they've got the capacity) or the family? When do they decide? Who settles a conflict and how is that dispute settled?
But they are doing it now and it is not codified.
If euthanasia is legal there will be common law mistakes and criminal actions. But so what ? That is a part of everything we touch. It is the need that dictates we move forward, not the fear that stops us from moving that we should be concerned about.

0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 05:06 pm
@aidan,
Quote:
He died in peace and with dignity.
That was a very moving story. As sad as it is to say farewell to our loved ones it is far harder to watch them suffer with no hope in sight, perhaps just for our sake.
Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 05:08 pm
Lets take a hypothetical...I am in my late seventies and my health fails...do I want resources spent to give me another seven years of bad health or do I want it spent on my grandchildren, or possibly my great grandchildren to give them seventy years of good health ? Thats not a tough decision in anyone's books.
jm18
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 05:11 pm
@Kaycheeks,
i agree, everyone should have their right to choose.
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Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 07:55 pm
@Ionus,
playing devil's advocate:

...but no one has the a crystal ball when someone has what seems to be terminal illness. At times what may seem like a certain deadly illness that could artificially prolong someones' suffering, might turn into something that is recoverable. Hastening their death could mean a drastic mistake. Humans make such mistakes all the time with the use of imperfect medical knowledge.

Until greater medical knowledge (and medical ethics) is gained, I don't want the responsibility of effecting a premature death ... any more than I want to see my dear family member suffer unnecessarily and linger in that persistent vegetative or torturously painful state.
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 11:42 pm
@Ionus,
It was the first time I'd seen someone die. And actually, it was the first time I'd seen someone suffering to that extent.
Seeing what he went through and actually seeing the physical evidence on his body as we bathed it - his inner arms a mass of bruises from elbow to wrist from needle pricks and IV's - his wonderful, long, runner's legs atrophied and shrunken from lack of circulation...I realized that no one's body is created to last forever or even indefinitely.
It had gotten to the point with him that every needle prick was just one more torturous moment to be gotten through.
He'd lived a wonderful long life on his own terms. He couldn't bear to live this torture and pain-filled diminished version- and watching and observing the peace he was offered at this time when pain was the only thing on his horizon - I was happy to see him take it- despite the great and sad loss it meant to me.

Yes, I do think the choice should be made to everyone. Again, I hope it is given to me when the time comes.
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Ionus
 
  0  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 11:46 pm
@Ragman,
You make a very valid point and I dont have an answer. I would ask which side are the numbers on....
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scientist2
 
  0  
Reply Tue 8 May, 2012 08:15 pm
@Kaycheeks,
It is a fallacy to use ancient civilizations like Greeks and Romans to justify somethng like euthanasia. The very fact remains that they are a lot more uncivilized than our modern culture.

It will be like comparing barbarians to modern americans in the 18th century. Of course we are more civilized now, know what's right and wrong a lot more compared to older civilizations.

Death is not something to be ashamed of. It is but part of life. God uses death as an important tool, usually to repent from sins and other wrongdoing to others.

It's amazing, but you will often see a dying person being blessed with grace. Like a relative or friend going to his deathbed, to make amends or even to forgive that dying person face-to-face; an event that is highly unlikely to happen if the dying person was completely healthy. Sad, but it's reality.

0 Replies
 
JessieMulhern11
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Oct, 2012 07:21 am
@aidan,
Hi aidan, I'm replying to this post about your father from a couple of yours ago because i'm studying a magazine journalism degree at university and writing an article on euthanasia for a magazine. I was wondering if I could ask you a few questions about your feelings about euthanasia? I know you have already stated them in the post but if i could get a quote from you it would be very helpful.
Could you explain what happened to your father in the hospital and what your feelings on euthanasia are and if they were different before his death?
Why do you feel that so many people are against it if it relives people living in pain?

I understand if you do not want to, thank you.
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aYakatori
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Apr, 2014 08:06 pm
@Kaycheeks,
Kaycheeks, I disagree with you about your views. The intentional killing of a person with the sole intention of ending their suffering is very gravely wrong. This is nothing short of murder. Suffering can have very good sideaffects, and as we all know life is not always easy, but these facts are absolutely no reason for anyone to choose or for anyone to assist in ending a person's life. Please respond, as i would like to discuss this issue with you further.
Alvin Yakatori
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