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Holy War on Switzerland?

 
 
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 08:41 am
Maybe Moammar Khadaffi just has this subtle sense of humor that no one understands:

http://www.upi.com/Top_News/International/2010/02/26/Gadhafi-urges-holy-war-on-Switzerland/UPI-67701267194635
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Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 1,469 • Replies: 19
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 08:43 am
Without claiming any superior knowledge, i'd suggest that Got-Daffy has neither any subtlety nor a sense of humor.
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 08:52 am
I guess Lybia will be ordering their Easter chocolate from Syria.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 08:54 am
Jesus, that boy's pathetic. He's been in power for more than 40 years now, high time for another coup d'├ętat . . .
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 09:00 am
From Brandon's link

Quote:
Gadhafi has been critical of a recent Swiss vote against construction of minarets, urging Muslims to boycott the country


That's actually beneficial to Switzerland.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 09:12 am
Actually, I can understand his anger at the Swiss ban on building minarets.

But his call for jihad is just bit over the top.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 09:16 am
@George,
George, that's not why he is angry. The Swiss arrested his son in 2008 and
right afterwards he started his holy war on Switzerland.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 09:22 am
about time somebody did

the swiss with there obnoxious neutrality and all the chocolate and yodeling, disgusting
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 09:55 am
@George,
His anger may be understandable, but not necessarily justifiable. Not all the nations of Europe are obliged to practice religious toleration, and more than that many of the Muslims who are now in Europe and who howl about things like this and the French ban on Muslim head wear by girls in their schools are immigrants from nations which definitely do not practice religious toleration.
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 10:08 am
At the risk of squelching the chortling, these comments are coming from the leader of a nation who 1) was found complicit in the terrorist aircraft bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland and 2) was earnestly engaged, and very near successful, at obtaining nuclear weapons technology from Abdul Qadeer Khan. You remember, the national hero of our ally Pakistan?

Joe(with friends like...>)Nation

0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 10:08 am
@CalamityJane,
CalamityJane wrote:

George, that's not why he is angry. The Swiss arrested his son in 2008 and
right afterwards he started his holy war on Switzerland.

Good point, but I'd say he has at least some anger at the ban, and that's the
part of his anger (however small) I find understandable. I agree he's using
something many Muslims take offense at to justify his own agenda.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 10:11 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

His anger may be understandable, but not necessarily justifiable. Not all the
nations of Europe are obliged to practice religious toleration . . .

And I suspect there aren't a lot of church steeples in Libya.
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 10:16 am
@George,
Quote:
And I suspect there aren't a lot of church steeples in Libya.

I take that back. Turns out churches are permitted in Libya. My bad.
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 10:56 am
@George,
So they are - in fact churches and Christian monasteries can be found throughout Saudi Arabia and all other Middle-Eastern countries. I agree the Libyan leader is annoyed, but Switzerland is a small place, already has several hundred mosques, and construction of any more minarets (currently there are already 4 in the entire country) presents an architectural difficulty rather than make a religious statement.

On Professor Khan of Pakistan: he did sell technology to others, as these 2 books and review from Foreign Affairs make clear >
Quote:
Nuclear Black Markets: Pakistan, A. Q. Khan, and the Rise of Proliferation Networks -- A Net Assessment. International Institute for Strategic Studies, 2007.

Shopping for Bombs: Nuclear Proliferation, Global Insecurity, and the Rise and Fall of the A. Q. Khan Network. By Gordon Corera. Oxford University Press, 2006.
The International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) has provided a great service with this analysis of the nuclear network masterminded by A. Q. Khan, the man former CIA Director George Tenet described as "at least as dangerous as Osama bin Laden." For almost two decades, Khan's network -- based in Africa, Asia, and Europe -- sold nuclear enrichment technology, nuclear weapon design information, and expertise to Iran, Iraq, Libya, and North Korea, while effectively bypassing the export control regime. Equally valuable is this report's examination of the efforts to halt the illicit nuclear trade. What remains worrisome is the degree to which global proliferation networks and nuclear black markets continue to function as instruments of state policy or as the new favored business model for nuclear entrepreneurs. Gordon Corera's book complements the IISS study, offering a detailed historical context of Pakistan's nuclear program and the central role A. Q. Khan played in its development. Corera explores how Khan and his confederates constructed and maintained the network, demonstrates the immense difficulty the U.S. intelligence community had in detecting and monitoring it over decades, and illuminates the great problems involved in mustering the political will necessary to stop Khan's network when Islamabad was a major ally in the war on terror.

>but he had no choice in the matter, if he wanted to generate funding for his own country's acquisition of nuclear weapons. Of his 4 clients, btw, North Korea did manage to build nuclear weapons and Iran is well on its way to doing so. The 2 who decided to abandon their nuclear ambitions, Iraq and Libya, are the ones who've suffered most by endless sanctions, travel bans, bombardments, and other penalties. Nobody is attacking North Korea now, and Iran has obviously noticed.
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 12:41 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

So they are - in fact churches and Christian monasteries can be found
throughout Saudi Arabia and all other Middle-Eastern countries. . . .

My understanding was that there were no Christian church buildings in Saudi
Arabia. In some compounds, there are buildings used as churches, but they
are not designated as such and bear no outward signs of their use as churches.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Feb, 2010 12:44 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:

So they are - in fact churches and Christian monasteries can be found throughout Saudi Arabia ...

That is simply false.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 07:39 am
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:

about time somebody did

the swiss with there obnoxious neutrality and all the chocolate and yodeling, disgusting


Gotta hate that chocolate and yodelling - what are they thinking? Ricola!
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 11:48 am
@joefromchicago,
http://www.sacredsites.com/africa/egypt/mount_sinai.html
I knew I went to visit this when I was working in Jeddah (with private air transport arranged by my then Saudi employers) and never bothered to ask if it's on their territory or not. You are wrong however in thinking they have anything against Christians - or at least ignorant of Mohammed's life and writings.

Quote:
After the Empress Helena, the next famous pilgrim to the Jebel Musa and the monastery was the Prophet Mohammed. Being well treated by the Orthodox Christian monks, Mohammed gave his personal pledge of protection, which then became incumbent on all Muslims thereby ensuring the monasteries continued existence. through the 14th centuries many thousands of pilgrims came annually
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 11:57 am
@High Seas,
More quotes on the subject - on the off chance somebody here want to learn something about Islam:
http://islamonline.com/news/articles/2/Prophet-Muhammads-promise-to-Christians.html
Quote:
,,,,If a female Christian is married to a Muslim, it is not to take place without her approval. She is not to be prevented from visiting her church to pray. Their churches are to be respected. They are neither to be prevented from repairing them nor the sacredness of their covenants.....
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Feb, 2010 12:03 pm
@High Seas,
High Seas wrote:
I knew I went to visit this when I was working in Jeddah (with private air transport arranged by my then Saudi employers)

you worked for the terrorists, why doesn't this surprise me
0 Replies
 
 

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