21
   

There is a word for that!

 
 
adspires516
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jun, 2010 07:36 pm
@djjd62,
one of my fave's too = ]
0 Replies
 
Quincy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2010 07:01 am
Some of the words mentioned in this thread: apophenia, pareidoliacal, rupophobia, lachanphobia; can we really say these are English words? They're basically borrowed directly from other languages. When do we decide that such thoroughly foreign words are English words in fact?
I watched the American Spelling Bee finals for the first time recently, and almost all the words the kids were asked to spell were basically foreign words that were maybe perhaps used once or twice by some pretentious writers. Shouldn't we be encouraging kids to learn English words?
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2010 12:45 pm
@Quincy,
Quote:
Some of the words mentioned in this thread: apophenia, pareidoliacal, rupophobia, lachanphobia; can we really say these are English words? They're basically borrowed directly from other languages. When do we decide that such thoroughly foreign words are English words in fact?


Yup, we surely can. Quincy. English loves borrowed words, always has. I wonder what percentage of English "words" are actually borrowed. I suspect that it is very high.

Quote:
I watched the American Spelling Bee finals for the first time recently, and almost all the words the kids were asked to spell were basically foreign words that were maybe perhaps used once or twice by some pretentious writers. Shouldn't we be encouraging kids to learn English words?


There is and was a great deal of pretentiousness in this, of that there is no doubt. But just because one borrowed word is obscure doesn't mean that it doesn't have a place in English beside another, more frequently borrowed word.
oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Jul, 2010 07:57 pm
@JTT,
To think it all began with just two grunts.
Rickoshay75
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 05:51 pm
@wandeljw,
wandeljw wrote:

Often words fail me when I am trying to describe something unusual. I am happy when I find that someone has already coined a word that expresses the exact idea.

For example:
The fallacy of seeing a pattern or connection where none actually exists is called "apophenia".


love that blooms by being near to the opposite sex is -- Propinquity,
0 Replies
 
Rickoshay75
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 05:54 pm
@oolongteasup,
oolongteasup wrote:

pareidoliacal revelations often come to me in the shower while i'm contemplating no god

the mongrel always calls when i'm in the shower


Mongrel, is that your boss or wife?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Dec, 2014 06:17 pm
@oolongteasup,
You only get one grunt. You're a girl.
InkRune
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 08:31 pm
@roger,
shots fired
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 10:05 pm
@InkRune,
I guess I'm not following.
0 Replies
 
oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 10:14 pm
@roger,
I say:

Quote:
To think it all began with just two grunts.


You say:

Quote:
You only get one grunt. You're a girl.


I say:

I'm gruntled you think so, unless it's one per person and a 5 year gestation.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Dec, 2014 11:10 pm
@oolongteasup,
One grunt means "yes". You only get one grunt.
0 Replies
 
lmur
 
  3  
Reply Mon 18 Jan, 2021 03:51 pm
Found out todaythat a string of typographical symbols used in place of an obscenity is called a 'grawlix'.

Well, f#*$ me pink.
0 Replies
 
 

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