24
   

There is a word for that!

 
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 12:31 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Quote:
I'm still trying to figure out why there is no word for the 2nd person singular pronoun in English.


you
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 02:22 pm
@wandeljw,
Quote:
The so-called "Bible Code" is an example of apophenia. Using equidistant letter sequences in Genesis some claim to have found predictions of modern day events such as political assassinations, catastrophes, epidemics, etc.


It's odd that the word was lost to you even for a second, Wandeljw. The word for this is bullshit. Smile
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 04:37 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
I'm still trying to figure out why there is no word for the 2nd person singular pronoun in English.


you



That's 2nd person plural, JTT. Even you should know that.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:14 pm
@George,

Quote:
When I first came to work here at the Widget Factory, I could not understand
their use of the word "nominal". I'd only ever heard it used to mean "in name
only". But here we say a test's results were nominal, or a mission flew
nominally when everything went as expected. One doesn't say OK because
that implies there were no errors. Nominal means there may have been errors,
but none that were unexpected.


Is this a new form of English, where you can assign random meanings?
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:27 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
Is this a new form of English, where you can assign random meanings?


JTT has been advocating that for years, McT.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:38 pm
@Merry Andrew,
You, Merry Andrew, are mistaken. And so often, even you don't know that.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:43 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
George: But here we say a test's results were nominal, or a mission flew
nominally when everything went as expected. One doesn't say OK because
that implies there were no errors. Nominal means there may have been errors,
but none that were unexpected.


Quote:
McTag: Is this a new form of English, where you can assign random meanings?


Quote:
M-W

Function: adjective

nominal

5 : being according to plan : satisfactory <everything was nominal during the launch>
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:44 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Quote:
JTT has been advocating that for years, McT.


Merry, please stop trumpeting your ignorance. There are still people about who think you know a thing or two about language.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 05:49 pm
Quote:

AHD

nom·i·nal

ADJECTIVE:

7. Aerospace & Engineering - According to plan or design: a nominal flight check.


0 Replies
 
oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 09:46 pm
@wandeljw,
neologisms et al are as sexy as you are

i'm trouncing disfriend with

endship meaning to fri a friendship

no, not you

love that haircut, the do and the glasses simply scrumptious

only joking k

and stay away from those religious threads it makes you seem too sensible

so why isnt sac rilege bundled into a great big sacrelige is what i wanna know
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 10:27 pm
@oolongteasup,
wandel will come back and say that you remind him of tryagain. Wink
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Feb, 2010 10:31 pm
@CalamityJane,
I was thinking that oolongteasup must be a big fan of tryagain. What a coincidence that you mention that.

0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 02:24 am
@JTT,

That's the stupidest thing I've heard today. How could "nominal" be assigned a meaning (even at #5) of "satisfactory; according to plan".

It doesn't mean that at all.

Somebody should write to M-W Online (an American undertaking, one assumes) and point out to them the error of their ways.
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 06:00 am
Under the tropical zodiac, the Sun enters Capricorn by definition at the moment of winter solstice, or roughly at December 22, and leaves it around January 19.

You know what happened on January 19...?!?!?

wandeljw DID NOT POST ON A2K !!!

Ha! You seeing it? Ha!!
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 06:59 am
@Eorl,
Good example of apophenia, Eorl.

Here is another example. A psychology instructor gave out pencils to students for an exam. He noticed that many female students failed to return the pencils when class was over. He claimed that he now had support of Freud's theory of penis envy.
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 07:16 am
@wandeljw,
Is it a symptom of schizophrenia, the kind of thing John Nash experienced?
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 09:17 am
@Eorl,
Apophenia has been mentioned as a factor in John Nash's illness. Mathematicians see patterns and connections (real or not real) that most people do not see. Apophenia is not always delusional, sometimes the connections or patterns are legitimate.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 12:29 pm
@McTag,
Quote:
How could "nominal" be assigned a meaning (even at #5) of "satisfactory; according to plan".

It doesn't mean that at all.


It's not a theoretical issue, McTag. It's a done deal. It means precisely that when, and these are the operative words, the context matches that meaning for certain dialects of English.

You shouldn't expect that you can climb up an apple tree and find peaches.

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 03:00 pm
@wandeljw,
Quote:
Apophenia is not always delusional, sometimes the connections or patterns are legitimate.


Quote:
The fallacy of seeing a pattern or connection where none actually exists is called "apophenia".


Don't we have a contradiction here, Wandeljw?

I wonder what the word is for seeing a pattern or connection where everyone thinks none actually exists.
wandeljw
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Feb, 2010 03:34 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Quote:
Apophenia is not always delusional, sometimes the connections or patterns are legitimate.


Quote:
The fallacy of seeing a pattern or connection where none actually exists is called "apophenia".


Don't we have a contradiction here, Wandeljw?

I wonder what the word is for seeing a pattern or connection where everyone thinks none actually exists.


Like you said, it depends on context. I should have said apophenia is simply a tendency to see patterns or connections.

It seems that in the case of John Nash, the same quality that led him to come up with game theory also contributed to his psychological problem.

Maybe the negative variety should be called "delusional apophenia".
0 Replies
 
 

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