8
   

IF U HAD TO CHANGE PROFESSIONS, WHAT'd U CHOOSE?

 
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 12:54 pm
I can't say it would be possible or practical to make a career change now in my life. I can say what I would have done if I knew then what I know now.

I would have become a certified rolfer, and a part time yoga instructor.
http://www.rolfing.org/index.php?id=98
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 01:38 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
psychology?
I am 1 class short of my minor in that, no way for me!

Hmm race car driver.....because it's fun and I enjoy it Smile
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 03:21 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

I can't say it would be possible or practical to make a career change now in my life.
I can say what I would have done if I knew then what I know now.

I would have become a certified rolfer, and a part time yoga instructor.
http://www.rolfing.org/index.php?id=98
Maybe u coud ease into it on a part time basis, slowly?
I heard that Rolfing is very painful; (not for the masseur).
Anyway, I hope that u will have everything work out the way u want.






David
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 03:40 pm
art teacher
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 04:46 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

chai2 wrote:

I can't say it would be possible or practical to make a career change now in my life.
I can say what I would have done if I knew then what I know now.

I would have become a certified rolfer, and a part time yoga instructor.
http://www.rolfing.org/index.php?id=98
Maybe u coud ease into it on a part time basis, slowly?
I heard that Rolfing is very painful; (not for the masseur).
Anyway, I hope that u will have everything work out the way u want.

David


Well, there is only one place in the United States where you can get certified, the Rolf Institute of Structural Intergration in Boulder Colorado.
http://www.rolf.org/

the link below shows the coursework and inbetween study/internship periods.
http://www.rolf.org/pdf/FORSI_Steps.pdf

I would have to quit my job, move to Colorado for several periods on and off, at a pretty hefty expense, not to mention the loss of mine and my husbands health insurance. Also, at this stage, I am not enthused about starting a new business, start up costs etc.
One of my best friends did just this a few years back, along with becoming a certified pilates instructor. She isn't married, and is very creative in finding ways to make enough money to get by. She's just a couple years younger than me, and is only at this point starting to make a living.

I did the going back to university as an adult to get a 2nd degree, at the beginning of my marriage. I did that for my self satisfaction to prove that I could be a scholar.
The rate of return in satisfaction at doing something that I've become such an advocate of, would not surpass what I would have to give up. One nice thing about the age I'm at is that I also have other creative outlets that have become very important to me.
I'm not sad, I just think if I were quite a bit younger, and knew myself better back then, that is a path I could have taken.
Perhaps there's another Chai in a parallel universe doing just that. That's a happy thought.

My rolfer was the one who suggested I take up yoga. The 2 compliment each other, making you more balanced and whole that if you just did one alone.

Although I'm amazed at how far I've come, there's not going to be a time in the next decade where my practice will have come far enough that I could teach others. There's just too many things that will take much time to unbind.
That's ok, it's not a race. I'm right were I should be.

No, rolfing is not painful, at least if it's done properly. There can be a lot of pressure at moments, and if some people choose to, they can call that pain. It's not like you're forced to endure. If the pressure is too much the rolfer backs off, come at it from another angle, etc.
I would visualize what was going on in my body, and it would make the pressure welcome. I suppose if you just wanted to lie there and not be an active participant in your well being, you wouldn't much like it.
I believe years ago, there was a tendancy to just push through, but it's been realized that is not necessary.

Just like yoga, it's not about wrapping your leg behind your head, it's about doing the best you can with who you are at that moment. The person who can lift their leg 1 inch is achieving the same benefit as the leg wrapper, if they are both doing what they can as perfectly as possible.

Anyway, I'll shut up now. I guess you can see I have quite a passion.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 04:57 pm
@chai2,
Good post, Chai.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 05:07 pm
@ossobuco,
Thank you
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 05:13 pm
@chai2,
Every time Id drink heavily (when I drank) rolfing always punctuated my intake period
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 06:05 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Every time Id drink heavily (when I drank) rolfing always punctuated my intake period
yes, I had assumed you wer'nt wrapped too tight, rolfing seems appropriate, did you also frequent EST?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 06:24 pm
@dyslexia,
Im obviously at the wrong bus stop.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 06:50 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Im obviously at the wrong bus stop.
if the bus says C A T D-9 you're at the right stop.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 07:44 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Every time Id drink heavily (when I drank) rolfing always punctuated my intake period
In your opinion, what r the effects of Rolfing on heavy drinking (or on alcoholism) ?
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 07:51 pm
@dyslexia,
dyslexia wrote:

OmSigDAVID wrote:

dyslexia wrote:
I'd want to be a trial attorney, that way I forget about such things as seeking truth
and concentrate on just winning arguments.
YES! Seeking truth is the job of scientists and juries.
the job of juries is to chose the best attorney. the job of scientists is to get published.


Seeking truth is the job of priests. But I just can't imagine Dys doing that! Wink
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 08:27 pm
@Eva,
Eva wrote:

dyslexia wrote:

OmSigDAVID wrote:

dyslexia wrote:
I'd want to be a trial attorney, that way I forget about such things as seeking truth
and concentrate on just winning arguments.
YES! Seeking truth is the job of scientists and juries.
the job of juries is to chose the best attorney. the job of scientists is to get published.


Seeking truth is the job of priests. But I just can't imagine Dys doing that! Wink
I like his hat, tho.

Eva, u have a charming avatar





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 09:08 pm
@chai2,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

chai2 wrote:

I can't say it would be possible or practical to make a career change now in my life.
I can say what I would have done if I knew then what I know now.

I would have become a certified rolfer, and a part time yoga instructor.
http://www.rolfing.org/index.php?id=98
Maybe u coud ease into it on a part time basis, slowly?
I heard that Rolfing is very painful; (not for the masseur).
Anyway, I hope that u will have everything work out the way u want.

David

chai2 wrote:

Well, there is only one place in the United States where you can get certified,
the Rolf Institute of Structural Intergration in Boulder Colorado.
http://www.rolf.org/

the link below shows the coursework and inbetween study/internship periods.
http://www.rolf.org/pdf/FORSI_Steps.pdf

I would have to quit my job, move to Colorado for several periods on and off,
at a pretty hefty expense, not to mention the loss of
mine and my husbands health insurance. Also, at this stage,
I am not enthused about starting a new business, start up costs etc.
One of my best friends did just this a few years back, along with
becoming a certified pilates instructor. She isn't married, and is
very creative in finding ways to make enough money to get by.
She's just a couple years younger than me, and is only at this point
starting to make a living.

I did the going back to university as an adult to get a 2nd degree,
at the beginning of my marriage. I did that for my self satisfaction
to prove that I could be a scholar.
That is most credit worthy! In what did u take your degrees?

My undergraduate degree was in philosophy.
I thawt that it 'd be a good pre-law background, based in argument.
In retrospect, I wish that I had stayed with my inclination
toward a psychology degree. I am interested in how people
see the world and in their reasoning processes.







chai2 wrote:
The rate of return in satisfaction at doing something that I've
become such an advocate of,
Meaning rolfing ?






chai2 wrote:
would not surpass what I would have to give up.
One nice thing about the age I'm at is that I also have other
creative outlets that have become very important to me.
Wanna tell us what creative outlets ?







chai2 wrote:

I'm not sad, I just think if I were quite a bit younger, and knew myself better
back then, that is a path I could have taken.
Perhaps there's another Chai in a parallel universe doing just that. That's a happy thought.
In theory, there r an infinite number of Chais doing an infinite # of things, President Chai.








chai2 wrote:
My rolfer was the one who suggested I take up yoga.
The 2 compliment each other, making you more balanced
and whole that if you just did one alone.
Do u have an opinion of Tai Chi ?








chai2 wrote:
Although I'm amazed at how far I've come, there's not going to be
a time in the next decade where my practice will have come far
enough that I could teach others.
What do u practice?







chai2 wrote:
There's just too many things that will take much time to unbind.
That's ok, it's not a race. I'm right were I should be.

No, rolfing is not painful, at least if it's done properly.
There can be a lot of pressure at moments, and if some people choose to,
they can call that pain. It's not like you're forced to endure.
If the pressure is too much the rolfer backs off, come at it from another angle, etc.
I would visualize what was going on in my body, and it would make the pressure welcome.

I suppose if you just wanted to lie there and not be an active participant
in your well being, you wouldn't much like it.
What shoud the savvy rolfee DO ?







chai2 wrote:
I believe years ago, there was a tendancy to just push through,
but it's been realized that is not necessary.
That 's when I heard about it's allegedly being extremely painful;
from a radio talk show host, a superb raconteur called Long John Nebel until 1978.






chai2 wrote:
Just like yoga, it's not about wrapping your leg behind your head,
it's about doing the best you can with who you are at that moment.
The person who can lift their leg 1 inch is achieving the same benefit
as the leg wrapper, if they are both doing what they can as perfectly as possible.

Anyway, I'll shut up now. I guess you can see I have quite a passion.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 09:11 pm
(In retrospect ..) I wish I'd changed jobs about half-way through my teaching career. To some other line of work which didn't involved such intense involvement with people. I've loved teaching, the constant challenges, the involvement in the lives of god knows how many children, the sheer pleasure seeing kids achieve, but ...
But, really, it sort of defined who I was for a long time, took over & left too little space for other things. I would have liked (after a full-on involvement in education for say, 15 years) a job where little more personal detachment was possible. Maybe something like propagating plants, retraining as a garden designer, even something like creating & maintaining gardens. I like the idea of a change to physical work, too, as opposed to so much mental activity. The thought of working outdoors, too, & being able to stand back & say "I did that!" really appeals. Money & "advancement" would be completely a secondary concern in any new position. (Come to think of it, it always was! Wink )
0 Replies
 
jjorge
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Jan, 2010 11:24 pm
I am now retired after thirty-five years as a clinical social worker in the mental health systems of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. I worked primarily with adults in outpatient clinics, psychiatric hospitals and emergency rooms and as a reserve component Army Social Work Officer.

In 1996 I had many discussions with my daughter who was taking the LSAT, and going through the process of applying to law schools etc. (she is now a lawyer)

The latter experience lead me to conclude that if I were younger and changing careers, I'd probably want to go to law school.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 12:34 am
@jjorge,
jjorge wrote:

I am now retired after thirty-five years as a clinical social worker in the mental health systems of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. I worked primarily with adults in outpatient clinics, psychiatric hospitals and emergency rooms and as a reserve component Army Social Work Officer.

In 1996 I had many discussions with my daughter who was taking the LSAT, and going through the process of applying to law schools etc. (she is now a lawyer)

The latter experience lead me to conclude that if I were younger and changing careers, I'd probably want to go to law school.
Good choice.
0 Replies
 
 

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