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Number 85 - To see a tree asmiling.

 
 
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2011 11:26 am
@High Seas,
I can be a bit more specific -- I'm in Portland, Oregon, about a quarter mile from the Willamette River.

I can also add that all of the trees like this in my neighborhood are planted very close to the house so that might tell us something about their root system.
danon5
 
  3  
Reply Sat 17 Dec, 2011 06:55 pm
@boomerang,
Hello there, Very interesting tree. It appears to have been pruned from a small age to now. The tree looks like - if in it's natural state - it could very well be one of several varieties = ginkgo (maidenhair), or a type of birch (although the picture isn't clear enough to see the bark) My favorite from your neck of the woods is Alder.......... One of the best smokers of all. I lived in Gig Harbor - Tacoma and W. Seattle for about 18 years and am familiar with the area. Sorry I can't help you more.

Thanks for being interested in saving trees. It's free and only takes a minute a day.
http://www.care2.com/click-to-donate/rainforest/

0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  3  
Reply Sun 18 Dec, 2011 12:27 pm
@boomerang,
Boomer, we (all) would to need more info to ID the tree. Check out Sitka mountain ash. If that is similar to the leaves on your tree - it could be that - but heavily pruned to retain the shape it has now. Also, would help to know about the look of the seeds, flowers, bark, leaves, how the leaves are attached and such.

Thanks for the interesting subject.

boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Dec, 2011 08:42 am
@danon5,
Thanks for taking a look. I really appreciate it. I'll try to get over there for some more photos this week. I had no idea this tree would turn out to be such a mystery.

If I happen to find out what the heck it is I'll be sure and post an update.
High Seas
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Dec, 2011 03:46 pm
@boomerang,
First, the good news: y'all are not alone - so many others have grappled with IDing mystery trees of the Pacific Northwest that Oregon State University issued a book about it. The bad news is there's some work to do to solve your tree mystery. Start here: http://oregonstate.edu/trees/mystery_tree.html
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/images/EC1450.jpg

Quote:
Find the Identity of a Mystery Tree!

Click onto one of the mystery trees below to reveal a tree description, complete with photographs and text describing the characteristics of a particular tree. Then, connect with the dichotomous key to try to identify the tree's genus and species....At the bottom of the genus description, there will be a prompt that will connect you to a species page; you will be led to a page with descriptions and pictures of the species within that genus that are native to the Pacific Northwest. One of them will be your mystery tree!

After reaching a species you think matches your mystery tree, you can click back to the mystery tree page. You can then link to the solution page to find the answer to your mystery tree.
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Mon 19 Dec, 2011 05:36 pm
@High Seas,
Thanks High Seas!

Maybe I can even send my photos off to OSU for identification!
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Dec, 2011 05:59 pm
@boomerang,
Go through the keys I linked earlier (on the original thread) so you can see what information you need to gather for the tree to be identified.
danon5
 
  3  
Reply Tue 20 Dec, 2011 05:19 pm
@ehBeth,
Hi ehBeth, what happened to the Flashy Fir Coat???????????

Thanks all for saving another tree today.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2011 08:30 pm
@danon5,
I'm thinking this is an ordinarily available tree in the metropolitan area of Portland ( it was on two properties?), that some of us just don't get right away, including those at the apparent good nursery, which I say in a not mocking way.

Boom, you've an arboretum there, they are presumably a good source.
At least the people at the LA arboretum were for me, but you have to get through to the horticulture staff.

High Seas, I'm a tree noticer who lived for six years in an area not all so far from Portland, but not at all smart re tree i.d. in the new area, being busy.

This might be a tree that works for some situations there - so I'm interested.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2011 08:46 pm
@High Seas,
Sounds good. I'm for it.
But, tickle.

Gotta wonder: our conifer books were very thick and of more than one volume, per title.
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2011 07:34 am
@ossobuco,
Ossobuco!!!!!!! My goodness I think of you often.... Glad to see you again.

Yes, this is a very interesting tree. Although the pic I have is fuzzy - Need closer shots of the different items on the tree.

Thank you for dropping by --- and thanks a million for helping the WildClickers save a tree a day. They are asmiling at us.

0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2011 08:47 am
@boomerang,
Boomer - in addition to sending a photo and all other identifying features to OSU --- if there are other trees like yours in the neighborhood you could ask them if they know the name of the tree.

Thanks for clicking...............

danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2011 12:41 pm
@danon5,
Hey, fellow tree savers!!
I've figured out how to not worry so much -----------
I save all the grocery lists that both Patti and I make and then take them back to the store and -- WALLA!!!!
No problem. We usually have the same things regularly - so, there ya go........!!
0 Replies
 
alex240101
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2011 08:09 am
Cold snow , happy trees.
Warm warm tidings EhBeth, danon5 and gang.
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Dec, 2011 09:56 am
@alex240101,
Hi Alex ----- Long time, no hear from.......... Thanks for stopping by and thanks for clicking to save a tree. It means a LOT to our grandkids.

0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  3  
Reply Sat 7 Jan, 2012 02:26 pm
@danon5,
While looking for something completely unrelated to trees I found out that tree identification is a hot topic also on the East Coast! Who knew?
http://arboretum.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/Plant_Identification.pdf
http://arboretum.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/walnuts_small.jpg
danon5
 
  2  
Reply Sun 8 Jan, 2012 03:12 pm
@High Seas,
Thanks HS - it is interesting to note. There seem to be tree Id sites everywhere.

0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 2 Feb, 2012 03:40 pm
Hi All,

Good seeing everyone again. Saw an article you may be interested in...sue especially...about bees. Seems after how many years of 'study' its pesticides affecting bee populations and their ability to do what bees do...

http://www.commondreams.org/sites/commondreams.org/files/imce-images/pettis_bees_0.jpg

http://www.commondreams.org/sites/commondreams.org/files/imce-images/bayertreeshrub.jpg

More Damning Evidence Points to Pesticide as Cause of Mass Bee Deaths
Bayer-produced imidacloprid harmful to bees even at very low levels

A new study published in Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature by a leading bee expert provides damning evidence that a widely used pesticide, even at low levels, is responsible for the recent catastrophic decline in honey bees. Dr. Jeff Pettis of the USDA's Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, MD led the study.

Colony collapse disorder, as this phenomenon is known, has been getting worse since 2006.

The news has brought renewed calls for these pesticides, which only became widely used in the 1990s, to be banned as honey bees are key to human’s survival – pollinating 70 per cent of the crops which produce most of the world’s food.

The pesticide that the study (pdf) looked at was imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides worldwide. It is neonicotinoid insecticide produced by Bayer CropScience.
Findings give credence to fears that neonicotinoids are behind a worldwide decline in honey bees. (photo: Samantha G)

* * *

The Independent reports:

Compelling new evidence from the US government's top bee expert [Dr Jeffrey Pettis] that modern pesticides may be a major cause of collapsing bee populations led to calls yesterday for the chemicals to be banned. [...]

Researchers found that bees deliberately exposed to minute amounts of the pesticide were, on average, three times as likely to become infected when exposed to a parasite called nosema as those that had not. The findings, which have taken more than three years to be published, add weight to concern that a new group of insecticides called neonicotinoids are behind a worldwide decline in honey bees, along with habitat and food loss, by making them more susceptible to disease. [...]

"The science is now clear, bees poisoned by neonicotinoid pesticides are much more likely to die from disease, gather less food and produce fewer new bees."Buglife, the invertebrate conservation charity, is calling for a ban on the controversial pesticides. Its director, Matt Shardlow, said yesterday: "The science is now clear, bees poisoned by neonicotinoid pesticides are much more likely to die from disease, gather less food and produce fewer new bees." He added: "Buglife's 2009 review of the science of environmental impacts from neonicotinoid pesticides showed that there was serious cause for concern. We called for a ban then, and as subsequent research has only added to concerns, including the revelation that neonicotinoids make bees prone to a diseased death, we are repeating our call for these toxins to be banned."

The Government needs to take urgent action, said Tim Lovett, of the British Beekeepers Association. He backs the findings of the new research: "Their conclusions are right ... here is some data that would appear to suggest links between widely used pesticides and pathogens."
* * *

In October CNN reported:

The EPA has based its approval of neonicotinoids on the fact that the amounts found in pollen and nectar were low enough to not be lethal to the bees -- the only metric they have to measure whether to approve a pesticide or not. But studies have shown that at low doses, the neonicotinoids have sublethal effects that impair bees' learning and memory. The USDA's chief researcher, Jeff Pettis, told me in 2008 that pesticides were definitely "on the list" as a primary stressor that could make bees more vulnerable to other factors, like pests and bacteria.
* * *

The new study puts the "low enough to not be lethal to the bees" under scrutiny.

This is potentially game-changing research for understanding Colony Collapse Disorder.Last year Tom Philpott wrote on Grist about a report in the Independent showing:

... Pettis at the USDA’s very own Bee Research Laboratory completed research two years ago suggesting that even extremely low levels of exposure to neonicotinoids makes bees more vulnerable to harm from common pathogens.
Philpott noted:


Bayer's miracle - "A simple method of insect control consists of drenching the soil around a tree with a product containing Imidacloprid."
This is potentially game-changing research for understanding Colony Collapse Disorder. Scientists have been focusing on the interaction between the Nosema fungus and a virus called Iridoviridae as the culprit. Pettis’ research seems to suggest that neonicotinoids play a role, too — and at levels so low that researchers may be overlooking them.

So, let’s get this straight. The chief scientist at the top U.S. government bee-science institute completed research two years ago implicating a widely used, EPA-approved pesticide in what can plausibly be called an ecological catastrophe — the possible extinction of honeybees, which pollinate a huge portion of U.S. crops. Why are we just now hearing about this — and why are we only hearing about it through an obscure documentary filtered through a British newspaper?
# # #
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Thu 2 Feb, 2012 04:03 pm
My goodness, it's been a few months since my last visit! Missed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year!

Hope all the wildclickers are having a great year and looking forward to an even better Spring and Summer.

California weather's cold, dry, with many sunny days. Rain and snow at a minimum for the Winter season...however, it ain't over till it's over...we may see snow in March. Mother Nature and the Sun seem to be at odds lately...all those flares shooting everywhere.

Make it a great day wildclickers. Smile
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Thu 2 Feb, 2012 04:20 pm
http://i.huffpost.com/gen/486171/thumbs/o-LAKE-VOSTOK-ANTARCTICA-570.jpg?1


Lake Vostok, Antarctica's Largest Subglacial Body Of Water, Soon To Be Explored

Deep beneath miles of Antarctic ice lies a large freshwater lake that will soon be exposed for the first time in millions of years.

Lake Vostok, which is the largest of Antarctica's subglacial lakes and also one of the largest lakes in the world, has not been touched by light for over 20 million years, according to The Washington Post.

A team of Russian scientists is poised to penetrate the lake next week and begin probing for signs of life. The harsh weather conditions on the surface of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet mean that drilling through over two miles of ice has been an arduous process spanning two decades, explained The Washington Post.

[SCROLL DOWN FOR GRAPHIC.]

Unfortunately for the scientists, their job won't be much easier once they drill the final 40 feet into the lake. Discover magazine explains that concerns are growing about preventing bacterial contamination of the "pristine" lake.

Even more menacing is the threat of a geyser-like explosion. The lake reportedly contains "quite a bit of gas," meaning that an explosion could occur if the pressure isn't released carefully. In fact, a large geyser could send enough water vapor to the surface to alter Antarctica's weather.

John Priscu, an antarctic researcher at Montana State University told The Washington Post, "This is a huge moment for science and exploration, breaking through to this enormous lake that we didn't even know existed until the 1990s."

Elsewhere in Antarctica, a team of British scientists is preparing to drill down to another subglacial lake later this year. British Antarctic Survey scientists staged over 70 tons of equipment above Lake Ellsworth last month in preparation for drilling in November.

But the British team isn't very concerned with beating the Russians, reports OurAmazingPlanet. The head of the British project, Martin Siegert, said, "It's not a race for penetrating a glacial lake. We're not adventurers. We're doing science. There are questions we're asking and trying to answer."

Even so, there is still a chance the Russians will not reach the lake on schedule. In January 2011, the Russian team was allegedly within 20 to 40 meters of penetrating Lake Vostok, according to Nature.

The Russian team had to quit, however, and grab the last flight off the ice before winter hit one of the most inhospitable places on Earth, reported OurAmazingPlanet.

Check out the graphic below from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory:
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