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So, you Kindle people...is it worth it?

 
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 07:46 pm
@dlowan,
http://www.npr.org/2011/03/27/134897271/cheaper-than-a-tablet-rooting-your-e-reader&sc=nl&cc=nh-20110327

Quote:
The Amazon Kindle has 3G data connectivity so that readers can download e-books anywhere there is cell service. As many Kindle owners know, the device can connect to Google and Wikipedia to look up things mentioned in e-books, too. That connectivity is all the opportunity hackers need to turn an e-book reader into a tablet.

"This is something that is starting to get around in geek and hacker circles, and it's a relatively cheap way to have Internet anywhere you go," Altman says.

When Altman says it's cheap, he's referring to the fact that the 3G Kindle costs a mere $190 and there is no charge for the 3G Internet.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 07:48 pm
@dlowan,
This has been useful, as I just discovered that I can use the PDA Set gave me years ago as an e-reader! I'm going to have to charge the battery on that sucker and load in some books for transit reading.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 07:54 pm
@ehBeth,
And their 3G is FAST!!!!!
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 09:11 pm
@dlowan,
Kindle reader for Android is really cool. I love all of the free books.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 09:21 pm
@dlowan,
you gonna root yur kindle bunny?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 09:41 pm
@dadpad,
Not in the traditional sense, no.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 2 Apr, 2011 09:44 pm
@dlowan,
Digital rooting can be fun too
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2011 03:16 pm
Now that I've read extensively on both an iPad and a Kindle all I can say is that the Kindle is almost there. There are a few very frustrating things about it (though I'll still use it):

1) The page turning buttons are annoyingly placed. Hard to hold without flipping pages.

2) For that matter all the buttons are, this thing has little room to hold without touching the screen or buttons.

3) The cost of getting a good light to use (since it's not backlit) is often expensive (the case with a light for the kindle that I bought is about half the price of the kindle itself) and is not very convenient (to need a led light hanging on the kindle to read at night).


IMO they keyboard should be slide-out (I never use it other than to setup the kindle the first time), making it easier to hold somewhere where there are no buttons and the light should be built into the kindle (around the bezel of the screen, like some stopwatches).

But it does it's job and it's a better experience in many other ways (like battery life and lack of distractions) to reading on an iPad.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2011 04:47 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I find I have become accustomed to the buttons and can hold the thing without pushing them.

I find the weeniness of the keyboard letters annoying when I am checking the Kindle store from the Kindle.

The expense of the cases is ridiculously high, I agree.

I am trying to find something I already have to protect the Kindle when I am carrying it around, or leaving it somewhere, because it is quite fragile.

It does need some light to read by, but I find it fine with my low energy light bulbs.

Amazon sent me my new Kindle by priority mail when mine broke, did not charge for it, and refunded the cost of emailing the old one back to them.

They also set up the new Kindle with my whole library for me and handled the complexities that came with my having picked up the original one in the USA (who knew there would be a number of complexities?)


0 Replies
 
cliffwill88
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Apr, 2012 10:41 pm
@dlowan,
Have you tried e-book?
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Apr, 2012 01:28 am
@cliffwill88,
Not sure what you mean. Is that an e-reader.

I have a Sony one that I haven't used for ages.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Wed 30 May, 2018 05:41 am
Stumbled on to this old thread. Just wanted to say that paper retains scores of advantages not mentioned above. Eg durability (books don't break easily, kindles do); afordability (generally); ease of access; no need for electric power; capacity to shape/transform the physical object (annotate, mark, fold, cut, etc.); reading on paper is better for your eyes; potential for meaningful gifts (offering an Amazon code as a gift just doesn't do the same thing); better protection of intellectual property (you can rip an e-book and share it as pdf for free, but it's a lot harder to photocopy an entire paper book); etc. etc.
0 Replies
 
 

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