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Obama wins 2009 Nobel Peace Prize

 
 
McGentrix
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 11:38 am
Some other Obama accomplishments...

http://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2009/obama_photoshop/obama_cy_young_b.jpg

Cy Young Award
Throwing out the first pitch at 2009's Major League Baseball All-Star Game, Obama wowed onlookers with his careful windup and awkward "mom jeans." Though his pitch fell a little short, his ubiquity in broadcast booths and SportsCenter specials throughout the year convinced MLB brass he had "created a new climate" in the game, thus earning him the top pitcher's trophy for his solo throw.

http://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2009/obama_photoshop/obama_pulitzer.jpg

Pulitzer Prize
Though he hasn't written it yet, Obama's postpresidential memoir is sure to be a page turner. Based on samples of his past work and Obama's imaginings of his future adventures, the Pulitzer committee decided his dominance of the nonfiction field was a foregone conclusion, awarding him the Pulitzer in 2010. The chapter on space exploration is expected to be the best.

http://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2009/obama_photoshop/obama_oscar.jpg

Oscar for Best Actor
After seeing an advanced screening of HBO's upcoming documentary By the People: The Election of Barack Obama, members of the Academy could hardly contain their glee. The meteoric rise of Hollywood's favorite politician, captured on hope-saturated reels, was more than enough reason to make documentary subjects eligible for Best Actor.

Curtesy of Time Magazine.
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 01:10 pm
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:
What are you trying to say Walter? ...

What makes his response uniquely "Walter," is that he says it without actually saying it. Thus, he leave open the possibility of his plausible deniability escape, which time and again he has demonstrated he is not afraid to use.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 01:32 pm
@Ticomaya,
Maybe he's a lawyer Tico. They are experts at that skill.

Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 01:47 pm
@spendius,
He might be.
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 01:50 pm
@Ticomaya,
We can see which one is.. Mr. Green
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 01:55 pm
@Francis,
I never said he wasn't a genius.
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 01:58 pm
@Ticomaya,
And not the opposite either..
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 02:06 pm
@Francis,
Hard to put one by you, Francis.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 02:42 pm
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:

You appear to be suggesting that the fine distinctions of European politics, taken together, necessarily represent all possible perspectives, -- that the difference between "center left", "center" and "labor" in Scandanavian politics spans all human possibilities. While this self-centered attitude is entirely in keeping with the contemporary European view of the world, it simply isn't true. However, it is also evident that the Nobel Trustees represent it as well.

It is a fitting legacy for the fortune of Alfred Nobel, which was accumulated through his support of a decades long arms race which later culminated in WWI.


I'm just saying that the Nobel Peace Prize Committee represents (more or less) the politcal attitude of the Norwegian people of a certain time period.

Something, Nobel obviously wanted, at least that's what he wrote in his will.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 08:21 pm
@anton,
Let us try to imagine a slight historical change. What if the mortgage meltdown had happened in November of 2007 after McCain won the election over Obama. McCain has no inkling of Economics. He has former Senator Phill Gramm who created the 'credit default swap' in a Congressional bill, as an advisor as well as Carla Fiorino, the former HP executive who advocated outsourcing of jobs. McCain looked up to these titans of business who were instrumental in the financial meltdown. He was a GWB clone so he would still be in Iraq with Hank Paulson as Treasury Secretary. The bank executives would have had a free hand on bonuses and load themselves up with Treasury loot. There would be a complete collapse of Wall Street as McCain has a hands-off approach regarding the economy. The scenario: A Stock Market Crash with troops still in Iraq. A Depression on the way...

The Depression of the 30s helped right-wing politicians like Francisco Franco of Spain, Benito Mussolini of Italy and most of all Adolph Hitler to come to power. They built up on arms thus helping their economies and of course from them we had WWII. The world had never experienced so damaging a war. We could ill afford another like it.

With the fortuitous outcome of the mortgage meltdown happening well before the November 2007 election the American public were given a preview of things to come under Republican control. Disaster was averted with Obama being elected. His economic policies has stopped the slide of the stock market and he has reduced political tensions around the world. For this he deserves the Nobel.
0 Replies
 
anton
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 08:31 pm
@Setanta,
The invasion of Afghanistan was as illegal as the invasion of Iraq and in no way justified by the attack on the World Trade Centre by Islamic extremists. It wasn’t Afghanistan or the Taliban who attacked the WTO it was terrorists and as for Guantanamo Bay none of those people remaining there have been charged with a crime and where I come from, and in the US, (surprise, surprise) people are considered innocent until proven guilty.
Rather than the Norwegians presenting Obama with the Noble peace Prize I would much prefer to see GW Bush, Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld brought to task and charged with making war and crimes against humanity.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Oct, 2009 09:40 pm
@anton,
The invasion of Afghanistan was not illegal. You saying as much does not make it so. As i have pointed out, the people in Guantanamo may be innocent, but you dont' know that for a fact. But at least you have the honesty to reveal your rant for the partisan drivel it is. In fact, i was the first member to respond to this thread, and i stated that i didn't think this award was justified. But that doesn't make the invasion of Afghanistan illegal, and it doesn't authorize your hysterical rant about Guantanamo and Israel.

Try to stay on topic here, Bubba, OK?
0 Replies
 
Builder
 
  2  
Reply Fri 16 Oct, 2009 01:36 am
@anton,
Quote:
Rather than the Norwegians presenting Obama with the Noble peace Prize I would much prefer to see GW Bush, Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld brought to task and charged with making war and crimes against humanity.


You got my vote. As for the prestigious award going to Barack, I love the guy, but he's doing his job, or was, trying to get elected. He should not be in the running for such an award. Giving it to him, whether or not he donates the enormous prize money to charity, illegitimizes the whole selection process.


0 Replies
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Oct, 2009 06:58 am
Quote:
An Unconstitutional Nobel

People can, and undoubtedly will, argue for some time about whether President Obama deserves the Nobel Peace Prize. Meanwhile, though, there's a simpler and more immediate question: Does the Constitution allow him to accept the award?

Article I, Section 9, of the Constitution, the emolument clause, clearly stipulates: "And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State."

The award of the peace prize to a sitting president is not unprecedented. But Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson received the honor for their past actions: Roosevelt's efforts to end the Russo-Japanese War, and Wilson's work in establishing the League of Nations. Obama's award is different. It is intended to affect future action. As a member of the Nobel Committee explained, the prize should encourage Obama to meet his goal of nuclear disarmament. It raises important legal questions for the second time in less than 10 months -- questions not discussed, much less adequately addressed anywhere else.

The five-member Nobel commission is elected by the Storting, the parliament of Norway. Thus the award of the peace prize is made by a body representing the legislature of a sovereign foreign state. There is no doubt that the Nobel Peace Prize is an "emolument" ("gain from employment or position," according to Webster).

An opinion of the U.S. attorney general advised, in 1902, that "a simple remembrance," even "if merely a photograph, falls under the inclusion of 'any present of any kind whatever.' " President Clinton's Office of Legal Counsel, in 1993, reaffirmed the 1902 opinion, and explained that the text of the clause does not limit "its application solely to foreign governments acting as sovereigns." This opinion went on to say that the emolument clause applies even when the foreign government acts through instrumentalities. Thus the Nobel Prize is an emolument, and a foreign one to boot.

Second, the president has indicated that he will give the prize money to charity, but that does not solve his legal problem. Giving that $1.4 million to a charity could give him a deduction that would reduce his income taxes by $500,000 -- not a nominal amount. Moreover, the money is not his to give away. It belongs to the United States: A federal statute provides that if the president accepts a "tangible or intangible present" for more than a minimal value from any foreign government, the gift "shall become the property of the United States."

This is at least the second time that Obama has run afoul of the emolument clause. On June 3, 2009, the day before he gave his speech in Cairo on relations with the Muslim world, he accepted (and even donned) the bejeweled Collar of the King Abdul Aziz Order of Merit, Saudi Arabia's highest honor, from the hands of King Abdullah. (President Bush was awarded the Order in January last year.)

Aside from whether a president shows questionable judgment in accepting any preferment from the House of Saud named for its anti-Semitic modern founder, there is another issue: The Collar is clearly a chivalric "order" of the Saudi monarchy conferring a rank in that system of titled royalty and nobility. It is not a mere decoration or campaign ribbon. There does not seem to be any record of congressional permission asked for, much less granted, for the president to accept this bauble. Washington, Madison and Hamilton would have clearly understood that the Abdul Aziz Order falls under the same ban they had in mind for any public officials coveting awards made under the honors system of the British monarchy.

Taking President Obama at his word that the Nobel award is "an affirmation of American leadership," Congress should allow him to accept the award. The prize money, which legally belongs to the United States, ought to be applied by Congress to some worthy cause, such as reducing the deficit.

As for the Abdul Aziz Order, Congress should withhold approval and return the chain -- until the Saudis show their support for international peace by recognizing the right of Israel to live in peace within secure borders. That would honor Alfred Nobel's desire to promote "fraternity between nations" and fulfill the intent of the Framers that congressional approval would guard against attempts by foreign governments to meddle in American politics by dangling presents, titles or any other emoluments in front of our public officials.



Hmmmm... bit of a pickle I'd say.
engineer
 
  6  
Reply Fri 16 Oct, 2009 07:16 am
@McGentrix,
I'm surprised the Post wasted ink on this one

Quote:
An Unconstitutional NobelDoes the Constitution allow him to accept the award?

Article I, Section 9, of the Constitution, the emolument clause, clearly stipulates: "And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State."

The award of the peace prize to a sitting president is not unprecedented. But Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson received the honor for their past actions: Roosevelt's efforts to end the Russo-Japanese War, and Wilson's work in establishing the League of Nations. Obama's award is different. It is intended to affect future action. As a member of the Nobel Committee explained, the prize should encourage Obama to meet his goal of nuclear disarmament. It raises important legal questions for the second time in less than 10 months -- questions not discussed, much less adequately addressed anywhere else.

Like this says, it is not unprecedented. The stated reasons for Obama's award are not different. The Nobel committee stated clearly that they feel that is already completed accomplishments merit the award. Even if it was to influence future actions, he isn't keeping the money.

Quote:
An opinion of the U.S. attorney general advised, in 1902, that "a simple remembrance," even "if merely a photograph, falls under the inclusion of 'any present of any kind whatever.' " President Clinton's Office of Legal Counsel, in 1993, reaffirmed the 1902 opinion, and explained that the text of the clause does not limit "its application solely to foreign governments acting as sovereigns." This opinion went on to say that the emolument clause applies even when the foreign government acts through instrumentalities. Thus the Nobel Prize is an emolument, and a foreign one to boot.

Exactly, so Obama is pretty much required to donate it. The White House receives gifts all the time and either holds them as trusts for the people or disposes of them to charity or mueseums.

Quote:
Second, the president has indicated that he will give the prize money to charity, but that does not solve his legal problem. Giving that $1.4 million to a charity could give him a deduction that would reduce his income taxes by $500,000 -- not a nominal amount. Moreover, the money is not his to give away. It belongs to the United States: A federal statute provides that if the president accepts a "tangible or intangible present" for more than a minimal value from any foreign government, the gift "shall become the property of the United States."

You can't receive a tax deduction unless you claim the award as taxable income. The deduction and the income exactly balance out. If you work at a soup kitchen for eight hours, you can't claim a tax dedcution for eight hours of work unless you also claim eight hours of work as income. As to whether this was a "present" from a "foreign government" or just a Nobel award, Obama has lots of outlets for disposing of the money. Why not wait until he disposes of it and then complain?

Quote:
This is at least the second time that Obama has run afoul of the emolument clause. On June 3, 2009, the day before he gave his speech in Cairo on relations with the Muslim world, he accepted (and even donned) the bejeweled Collar of the King Abdul Aziz Order of Merit, Saudi Arabia's highest honor, from the hands of King Abdullah. (President Bush was awarded the Order in January last year.)

So how is this running afoul of the emolument clause? Unless he added it to Michelle's jewelry box, he's fine. I'm sure it is sitting right beside Bush's award in some display case somewhere.

Quote:
Aside from whether a president shows questionable judgment in accepting any preferment from the House of Saud named for its anti-Semitic modern founder, there is another issue: The Collar is clearly a chivalric "order" of the Saudi monarchy conferring a rank in that system of titled royalty and nobility. It is not a mere decoration or campaign ribbon. There does not seem to be any record of congressional permission asked for, much less granted, for the president to accept this bauble. Washington, Madison and Hamilton would have clearly understood that the Abdul Aziz Order falls under the same ban they had in mind for any public officials coveting awards made under the honors system of the British monarchy.

All this is really a stretch, but the funny part is that this guy clearly states that Bush got the same award. Did he write a similar essay for Bush? (Maybe he did, I don't know.)

I'm not a big fan of Obama getting the Nobel, but this kind of twisted logic trying to show why Obama is practically a felon for getting it is over the top. Can't people just not like the guy without foaming at the mouth?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sat 17 Oct, 2009 08:00 am
POSTED without comment, From Oct 17 Denver Post

Quote:
Keillor: Petulance and the Peace Prize

By Garrison Keillor
Posted: 10/17/2009 01:00:00 AM MDT


Evidently some people were disappointed that Dick Cheney didn't receive the Nobel Peace Prize, and believe me, I sympathize. I thought Philip Roth should've gotten the literature prize instead of that grumpy Romanian lady with the severe hair. But it was Mr. Obama whom the Norwegians wanted to come visit Oslo in December and stand on the balcony of the Grand Hotel and wave to the crowd along Karl Johans Gate. Face it, Mr. Obama is going to draw a bigger crowd than Mr. Cheney would have.

When a man has shot somebody in the face with a shotgun, people are going to be reluctant to line up en masse in his presence lest he get excited again. As for Mr. Cheney's boss, he was an unlikely pick for the Peace Prize after it was revealed by a White House speechwriter in a recent memoir that Mr. Bush once said, "I whupped Gary Bauer's ass." Boasting about ass-whupping is not the mark of a Nobel Peace Prize winner. The correct word is "whipping."

Going to Oslo in December and sitting through a black-tie banquet with a bunch of wooden-faced Norwegians and eating herring and delivering a speech larded with bromides about international cooperation and no jokes is not what I'd consider a whee of a good time, frankly. Oslo is rather dark and murky in December. The sun rises during the first coffee break and sets right after lunch and this does not make for a festive mood.

Some conservative pundit suggested that the president should've declined the prize, but it is not gracious to reject a compliment. One should accept it with becoming modesty, as Mr. Obama did, that's what your mother brought you up to do. The prize isn't about you, it's about Peace, or Literature, or Homecoming, or Champion Hog, or Male Vocalist of the Year, so walk up there and smile for the cameras, say thank you and sit down.

The wailing and gnashing of teeth that you hear among Republicans is 68 percent envy and 32 percent sour grapes. Here is an idealistic, articulate young president who is enormously popular everywhere in the world except in the states of the Confederacy, and here sit the 28 percent of the American people who still thought Mr. Bush was doing a heckuva job at the end, gnashing their teeth, hoping and praying for something horrible to happen such as an infestation of locusts or the disappearance of the sun, something to make the president look bad, which is not a good place for a political party to be, hoping for the country to slide into chaos. When you bet against America, you are choosing long odds.

A person can run down the list of all that's wrong with this country, including the lobbyists who cross back and forth from public service to influence-peddling like alligators on the golf course, or the bankers who lost their minds in the great mortgage mania, but the country has a history of rising to challenges and turning away from demagogues and doing what needs to be done. Because we are a passionately patriotic people, infused with a love of our history and our land, and so we have limited patience for fools, such as the ones who now dominate the right.

Conservatism is a powerful strain in American life that ordinarily passes as common sense. Save for a rainy day. Don't foul the nest. Don't burn your bridges. Don't sacrifice the future for short-term profit. But when it contradicts itself and becomes weighted down with bigotry and cynicism, then it doesn't hold water any more.

F. Scott Fitzgerald said, "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function." And conservatives tried to keep functioning through the Bush administration but the contradictions wore them down, and last fall, when the federal government wrote a blank check to stave off collapse of the financial sector, conservative principles came crashing to the ground, and now all they have in common is that they don't like President Obama. OK, but resentment of an American president being honored by the Norwegians is not a good point from which to build a Republican revival. Petulant fury isn't a winning hand in politics. Get over it.



DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Oct, 2009 09:25 am
@farmerman,
Two paragraphs stood out to me. Thanks for posting that.

Quote:
The wailing and gnashing of teeth that you hear among Republicans is 68 percent envy and 32 percent sour grapes. Here is an idealistic, articulate young president who is enormously popular everywhere in the world except in the states of the Confederacy, and here sit the 28 percent of the American people who still thought Mr. Bush was doing a heckuva job at the end, gnashing their teeth, hoping and praying for something horrible to happen such as an infestation of locusts or the disappearance of the sun, something to make the president look bad, which is not a good place for a political party to be, hoping for the country to slide into chaos. When you bet against America, you are choosing long odds.

...

Conservatism is a powerful strain in American life that ordinarily passes as common sense. Save for a rainy day. Don't foul the nest. Don't burn your bridges. Don't sacrifice the future for short-term profit. But when it contradicts itself and becomes weighted down with bigotry and cynicism, then it doesn't hold water any more.
0 Replies
 
 

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