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Anyone here make great hamburgers from scratch?

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:02 pm
@panzade,
Charlottesville, did you meet Rjb? I was there too ('87), and also didn't meet him, which I rue.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:06 pm
@msolga,
Quote:
Well good luck, Roberta!


Whoops. I called you Roberta by mistake, Robert.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:10 pm
@ossobuco,
Roger would totally crump when faced with a good steak tartare. Giggling as I post. Watching Roger crump..

I've only had that once, at a restaurant in wherever, facing san francisco bay.
Delicious.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:12 pm
@ossobuco,
I was studying there in '72...don't know if rjb was there then
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:19 pm
@panzade,
Possible meetings when we would have likely ignored each other, to our loss, you, Panz, and I, and Rjb.

Roger and I get a kick out of our very discernible differences. Take that, whap! but not all so whap, I think we discern points of view as with some basis. Or, if not, don't let me know.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:25 pm
@msolga,
msolga wrote:
Whoops. I called you Roberta by mistake, Robert.


No worries, I'll take that as a compliment!
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jun, 2009 08:35 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I'm glad we both see this in exactly the same way, Robert! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 10:18 am
I make a big batch of hamburger patties, portion them into freezer bags with wax paper between the patties, and freeze them.

I usually make 4 lbs of patties at a time, 80 - 85% meat/fat ratio. Add one packet of Liptons Onion Soup mix to the 4 lbs of ground beef and carefully fold in. I use a press to shape it into thick 6 oz patties and use the thumb depression trick. I've also replaced the soup mix with A-1 sauce and dehydrated onions and gotten good results.

Before cooking, I remove the patties from the freezer and let them thaw enough that they can be separated. I have a cast iron grill pan that I pre-heat before lightly dusting with a seasoning mixture (salt, pepper, garlic powder and onion powder) and adding the burgers (still slightly frozen). Don't touch the burgers before they brown or they will indeed stick. I keep the heat high and turn the burgers as soon as the first side browns with grill marks and then turn the heat down low to let them cook until adding a slice of cheese (I like pepper Jack) a minute before desired doneness.

Serve on good quality rolls slathered with mayo and brown mustard along with a thick slice of tomato, grilled onions, pickle and a lettuce leaf.

This is the kind of press I use. I got mine from Amazon about 6 years ago and it still holds up to the many uses it gets.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41cIavNX7FL._SL500_AA280_.jpg

Browning on high heat and then lowering the temp to cook usually results in very juicy burgers that don't shrink a lot. Don't flatten or press down on the burgers in an attempt to make them brown faster. That just dries them out.
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 12:04 pm
@roger,
Rog- The meat has to be thawed while it is still IN the sandwich bag. Just wanted to make sure that people were clear about that!
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 01:50 pm
@Phoenix32890,
Well sure. I hope that was clear when I said I thawed them quickly in warm water, but yeah, some people have to be told everything.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 01:54 pm
@Butrflynet,
You know, I'm kind of picky about condiments. Hamburger goes with mustard, tabasco, pickle, and onion. Cheeseburger works with lettuce, tomato, and mayonaise (or catusp).
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 06:29 pm
No mention of beetroot anywhere with your hamburger!

You'll never make it in Oz.

Beetroot is essential!
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 07:52 pm
@margo,
Well as Elstud (hubby) would say, real men don't eat beetroot. Smile

But we do make world class legendary hamburgers at our house, and it isn't rocket science.

1. Start with decent ground beef - fresh/unfrozen is best but you can get by with frozen if you absolutely have to.

2. Mix salt and black pepper to taste into the meat. Don't over or under season though.

3. Make patties of the seasoned meat about 1/2 inch thick if you like thinner burgers - 3/4 inch thick if you want more robust. Make the patties just about the same size as the cut surface area of your bun--the meat will shrink a bit when cooking.

4. Grill meat, turning frequently, to preferred doneness--medium to medium well when there isn't any pink left in the middle is the safest and personally I think tastes better than too rare or too well done. If you want cheeseburgers, add a slice of cheese to the top of the meat for the last few minutes.

5. While grilling meat, also lightly butter the cut surface area of the buns and toast on the grill along with the meat. You don't want these really dark but just toasty and very slightly crunchy.

6. Also have crisp iceberg lettuce leaves, sliced fresh tomatoes, thin sweet onion slices, pickles (if you like them--we prefer bread & butter), mayo or mustard or mix these together to make a nice spread to slather on the toasted buns. Add a little ketchup to the spread if you're a ketchup lover.

7. Put cooked patty on one hot toasted bun half and top it with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles etc, enclose with the other bun half and serve and enjoy with melon and/or chips and/or soda and/or iced tea.

I guarantee you the best burgers you've ever had. Simple but exquisitely prepared is sometims the best.
Joeblow
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 08:11 pm
@Foxfyre,
Your method seems time honoured, and who am I to dispute your taste, but I disagree about turning "frequently." Flip once, Robert, when the blood has risen to the top.
Foxfyre
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Jun, 2009 08:16 pm
@Joeblow,
Perhaps it is a matter of taste. I find frequent turning allows the seasoning and juices to permeate and cook into the meat evenly and enhances the flavor.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Jun, 2009 09:22 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

msolga wrote:
Whoops. I called you Roberta by mistake, Robert.


No worries, I'll take that as a compliment!


Shoulda worked my way farther in this thread. Didn't think I had much to contribute hamburgerwise.

What a nice thing to read. Thanks, Robert.

I had a hamburger last night. Just salt and pepper in the meat (ground chuck). Broiled under a flame. Sauted onions on a toasted bun (and ketchup). Tasted good to me. A half sour pickle on the side. (Can't forget those greens.)
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Tue 30 Jun, 2009 10:38 pm
This article in the New York Times today seems appropo...

The Perfect Burger and All Its Parts


dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Jul, 2009 06:34 am
@ossobuco,
Quote:
Mark Richardson, the executive chef at the Four Seasons Hotel in San Francisco, swears the lid of a Hellmann’s mayonnaise jar makes the best possible burger mold.

YES
0 Replies
 
solipsister
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Jul, 2009 07:39 am
@Robert Gentel,
oh dear

no-one seems to have mentioned

stacking the buns
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 1 Jul, 2009 10:18 am
Cough, I finally looked up how to spell 'apropos'.

Anyway, I learned a few things from that article. Using brisket had never occurred to me.
0 Replies
 
 

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