10
   

Ideally shaped city.

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 07:07 pm
@farmerman,
Of course I do, I think that was an imposed goose foot/similar, or goose feet. Berserko.

How would we all design it differently, that'd be interesting, given varied constraints.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 07:23 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
, I think that was an imposed goose foot/similar, or goose feet. Berserko.
In English please?
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 07:29 pm
@2PacksAday,
I'll check it out 2packs
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 07:59 pm
@chai2,
I should say that I'm not comparing your ideas to the socialistic utopian ideas of Mr. Owens.....you did mention, having the classes intermixed, so as to help lower crime and such...he had similar ideas...and some that go way beyond that of course....and that was nearly two hundred years ago.

If you also look into terraforming...or setting up bases on the moon....mars...any celestial body besides our own....or even underwater......most images or ideas of how the cities might be shaped will come across very similar to your city structure.....out of pure necessity....breathable air being the most crucial need....and in making an articifical atmosphere the circle or dome shaped city...just comes naturally....high in the center...open ground in the outer areas.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 08:07 pm
@farmerman,
Well, in such and such a year, one of the sixtus popes arranged rome, with streets off to left right and middle (and there were later obelisks). This was considered a "goosefoot". Look at piazza del populo and further south.

Then look at Paris, and look at Washington, DC. Oh, and Versailles.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 09:04 pm
@ossobuco,
The center of DC is a big square , with diagonals as layed out by Elliot in the late 1790s. HOWEVER, the next layer of streets is skewed at about 11 degrees from the original street metes and bounds. This was not by design, its a classical error in azimuth and closure by later surveyors who hadnt corrected their Mag North. LEnfants and Elliots plats hadnt been finalized according to the fanciful maps shown in the tourist pamphlets and historical maps.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 09:13 pm
@farmerman,
A squaring error, only amuses me. Vey.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 09:28 pm
@ossobuco,
Thats why GPS surveying beats all other by a mile. THere are many cities with azimuthal closure errors and the people act like its a design element. NY is famous for several errors in azimuth. Almost any city thats been designed and layed out centuies apart will have these errors. Most architects arent surveyors . Also, North is scooting around much faster now than it has in the last 300 years
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 09:36 pm
@farmerman,
I'll buy all that, and so what?
0 Replies
 
MosaicPlanner
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 09:55 pm
Interesting discussion. I never knew there was a television series prompted by Bacon's work. (I like his written material, but I don't care for most of the work he did in Philadelphia.)

Getting back to the original question, I think I would want to see housing in almost every sector of the city. If the center city was without housing, it would die after business hours. Such a dead space would concern me.

While the question about the ideal city is very interesting, the design of the ideal suburb is probably more challenging. We have the benefit of reading about successful cities across the globe- some of which are thousands of years old. But how many publications have been written about popular suburban designs? Too often, we (collectively) critique suburbs on a district by district basis. Where is the broader perspective? Do suburbs receive the same design attention afforded to cities, or is it merely a matter of land use allocation? I suggest it is the latter.

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 10:00 pm
@MosaicPlanner,
Hey, Mosaic Planner, glad to see your post.

I don't disagree with you about housing, or the suburb mode, at least so far.

Back tomorrow.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 21 Jun, 2009 10:11 pm
@realjohnboy,
realjohnboy wrote:

If we are talking about a city built "from scratch," I would be inclined to forget about high rise office buildings and government buildings filled with workers in cubicles. That notion is going to disappear, perhaps in our lifetime.
JohnboyTown would consist, regardless of the shape, of neighborhoods where folks could live, work and shop. Lots of folks and lots of green space between them where the schools and cultural stuff would be.
Cars? Cars in the city? Why? Rather, an above ground and efficient transportation system.
And then there would be a "no sprawl" zone.

Have I managed to offend everyone's sensibility about urban planning?
Just saw this post, nodding.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 04:35 am
@ossobuco,
Its amazing how, several states have actually zoned out specific classes of structures in municipalities. Starting a city "from scratch" would have problems in the Commonwealths of Pa and Va.

In Pa, the Municipal Planning Code has a big list of "thou shalt nots" when oe builds a community or adds on. We had a new development about 15 miles away where they wished to develop a "traditional village" . They couldnt do it and now the "Traditional village" is a large cluster of houses in which, the only way anyone can buy a dozen eggs is to load up the car and drive ten miles to the town of Cochranville which has a convenience store. Its really a silly thing , planning code. It makes sprawl inevitable and actually incentivises developers to build in farm fields rather than infilling or adding onto existing munis.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 06:49 am
Walter Burley Griffen designed the city of Canberra Australias capital city.

In April 1911, the Australian Government held an international competition to produce a design for its new capital city. Griffin produced a design with impressive renderings of the plan produced by his wife. They had only heard about the plan in July, while on honeymoon, and worked feverishly to prepare the plans. On May 23, 1912 Griffin's design was selected as the winner from among 137 entries. The win created significant press coverage at the time and brought him professional and public recognition. Of his plan, he famously remarked:

"I have planned a city that is not like any other in the world. I have planned it not in a way that I expected any government authorities in the world would accept. I have planned an ideal city - a city that meets my ideal of the city of the future."

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7d/Canberra_Prelim_Plan_by_WB_Griffin_1913.jpg
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 07:52 am
so how is that layout working out dadpad?

did it stand the test of time?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 08:30 am
@chai2,
Yeah, Chai, that was what i was talking about. But it doesn't matter what type of plan you have in regard to expansion. No matter how you plan a city, you're going to eventually have a conflict with land use on the periphery, if the city grows.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 09:35 am
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
Ideally shaped city.

What do you think it would look like?

Now there's an easy one. The ideal city, as every civilized person knows, is New York, NY. Just surf to Google Maps and look what it's shaped like.

The End.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 09:47 am
@chai2,
On a serious note, chai2, your idea about concentric circles is a good one. It is known in economic geography as Th√ľnen rings.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 09:49 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:

chai2 wrote:
Ideally shaped city.

What do you think it would look like?

Now there's an easy one. The ideal city, as every civilized person knows, is New York, NY. Just surf to Google Maps and look what it's shaped like.

The End.


How true Thomas
http://www.graphicsoptimization.com/blog/wp-includes/images/go_examples/2007_11/NewYorker1976-03-29cover.png
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Jun, 2009 12:21 pm
@chai2,
Oooooooh I hates that picture....pulls both pistols and shoots up the place....Yosemite Sam style.

Bryson talked about Canberra in his book on OZ....."In a Sunburned Country".
 

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