22
   

RETIREMENT_AVOCATION/JOB/WHATEVER

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Feb, 2009 12:45 pm
@georgeob1,
Ill still be doing some project consulting , but the main thing is my second career has always been of more interest lately.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Feb, 2009 12:51 pm
@hamburger,
Specifically , Im trying to focus on significant contacts of significant geological ages, eras, and epochs. I will go out of my way for any neat geological scenerey but if an area has been well photoed I wont make it part of my journals. In the Perce rock area is a ignificant contact of the basal Cambrian as sepaparate from the Grenville. I havent seen it yet but some friends of mine on the NB survey have talked me into going and shooting it.
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Feb, 2009 05:59 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman :

went on a camping trip through quebec and the maritimes in the early 70's .
the bird colonies on PERCE ROCK where even more interesting than the rock .

what about the rock formations along the bay of fundy ?
i racall there were rockhounds looking for semi-precious stones - don't know if there are any left .

perhaps this website by the environment canada is of interest to you :

http://gsc.nrcan.gc.ca/landscapes/provinces_e.php?SelectedGlossary=&SelectedKeyworda=knob&SelectedKeywordb=&SelectedKeywordc=&SelectedKeywordd=&SelectedProvince=

get ready for retirement ... and enjoy it !
hbg



0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Feb, 2009 06:25 pm
@farmerman,
I recall some interesting stops on high school geography field trips just northeast of Kingston, Ontario by the 401 where the Shield dropped down. MAB (she posted to you on your heating thread) probably knows more abou this. She and her husband run an environmental consulting service in the area, and have been into some sites most folks don't get a chance to see. I'll drop her a note.

One of the other locations I've found interesting (other than Perce and many sites around Sudbury) is in the Brickworks here in Toronto.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Feb, 2009 06:30 pm
@ehBeth,
Brickworks north wall info

http://lostrivers.ca/points/BrickworksNorthwall.htm

http://lostrivers.ca/points/Brkwksec.gif

~~~

Quote:
Other comments and reflections
The brickyard is best known for the internationally significant geology of its north face, made famous by a geologist at the University of Toronto in the early twentieth century. As the site was quarried, a rare sequence of environmental changes in glacial and inter-glacial deposits was revealed dating back 125,000 years. Fossils discovered in this series of formations include the giant beaver and the types of clams and snails now living in the Mississippi Valley. The west wall reveals Toronto's bedrock, which was deposited 448 million years ago in a warm, shallow subtropical sea.


http://www.evergreen.ca/en/registry/view_project.php?ID=00238
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Feb, 2009 06:40 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman :
another website for you re. eastern ontario geological formations .

http://bobbredberg.com/geo/madocg1.html

the area is about an hour's drive north of lake ontario / highway 401 .

BANCROFT is considered the rockhounds capital of easten canada - gig GEMBOREE every year .

http://www.rockhoundgemboree.com/

you better get organized and start hunting for those rocks !
btw : there will be no overtime pay !
hbg
Chumly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Feb, 2009 12:41 am
Good for you FM! Me, I went into teaching as opposed to early retirement and not being much on traveling. Gotta keep the brain cells crisp, and it sounds like you'll be doing that.

All things being though, I think would rather be involved in philosophy / music than electrical / technology............but the die is cast for now
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Feb, 2009 04:45 am
@ehBeth,
Looks like the tops of the Pottery Road Formation and Rocky Hill aregood unconformities according to the cross section. Thanks. Ill have to add them to my list of Formational sites. I think Ill have to include a strat section with each photo. This is starting to look like a bigger project than I originally envisioned. Thats ok though.

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Feb, 2009 04:49 am
@hamburger,
Theres a lot of good stuff at the MAdoc web site. I cant recall ever being there. I was in the SUdbury, MEsabi, and SUlfide deposits of the Border areas.
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Feb, 2009 12:06 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman :

madoc is about an easy 2 hour drive from the 1,000 island international bridge - from there on going north and east will give lots of rocks .
you'll notice the names of many former mine-sites - including the famous/infamous "deloro" mine - it started as a goldmine about the late 1860's .

Quote:
In 1868 gold was discovered in Deloro, meaning "Valley of Gold". The Canadian Consolidated Gold Mining Company (a British company) began mining in 1873. This eventually failed since the recover of the gold was so poor. In 1896 Canadian Gold Fields Company bought Deloro and built the first mill where they used a new cyanide process to extract the gold. Roasting furnaces were used to remove the arsenic from the gold, but the quality of the gold was poor, forcing the closure of the mill in 1903. After the completion of the railroad in 1904 it opened up the possibility to ship silver to the Deloro mine for treatment. In 1906 the Deloro Mining and Reduction Company was formed. In 1915 the company changed it's name to Deloro Smelting and Refining Company Limited after Dr. Haynes developed the first commercially produced stellite in the world, which was manufacture at the Deloro plant.[2]



http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&q=madoc+ontario&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&resnum=1&ct=title

in the area are also some interesting sites with indian rock-paintings (mazinaw lake)

http://www.algonquinsofpikwakanagan.com/Photographs/Culture%20Pictographs%20A%20redrawn.jpg

and the serpent mound burial grounds/petroglyphs provincial park
(one of canada's historical sites)

Quote:
Deep within a forest northeast of Peterborough is the largest known concentration of aboriginal rock carvings in Canada. Carved into the white marble rock face hundreds of years ago, the 900 petroglyphs depict turtles, snakes, birds, humans and other images. Hiking trails meander through surrounding forests, wetlands and rocky ridges. Explore The Learning Place interpretive centre.


http://www.eagle.ca/VictoriaInn/spiritwalks/images/petroglyph.jpg

wishing you lots of good "rock hounding" !
hbg

ps some years ago an old schoolchum visited from germany . we was a bit of an amateur rockhound - anywhere we went he had his hammer and a sample bag with him .
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Feb, 2009 12:53 pm
@hamburger,
Thanks. Ill use this site as a kind of journal to see whether any of the sites I select are of interest to the public at large and not juswt geo students. Ill see how it workd out. AS long as there is no issue with copyright laws. ( iwant to retain ownership of the information) . If not, Ill maybe just summarize and keep it very general.
0 Replies
 
Joeblow
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Feb, 2009 02:06 pm
@farmerman,
Wow...great. Reading along with interest. Congratulations.

Pottery Road, huh?

It's not that far a drive to the Peterborough site from there, couple hours maybe two and a half.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2009 07:39 pm
Mt first trips are to photo record the contact between the Ordovician and the overlying SIlurian rocks in the Appalachian Reading Prong. There are about 5 important outcrops that, when lined up (even though they extend for 4 states) these contacts show how the older rocks were bent by continental collision. Ill be in lower NY, NJ, PA, Md, and WVa. This will make a neat photo journal and field trip guide for a thin chapter .
(all rights reserved)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2009 07:53 pm
@Joeblow,
Pottery Road. C'mon into town some weekend when you're not cottaging - we'll go there with the dogs. I particularly like it in hmmm winter, spring, autumn and summer.

In the summer, Jamie Kennedy's son runs a 'chip' stand at the Farmers' Market there. AweSome!
Joeblow
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Feb, 2009 08:53 am
@farmerman,
The initial leg seems very ambitious. I know you’re excited by the actual research, but I’ve got questions about the logistics of such a trip. Do you load up a Winnebago and go? It sounds like *the* ultimate road trip.
Joeblow
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Feb, 2009 08:54 am
@ehBeth,
Laughing

Beth, you’re on.

Summer or fall though. I’m a cold lightweight.

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Feb, 2009 09:41 am
@Joeblow,
Part of the reason Im doing the tasks by geologic era and epoch is that I can keep the outcrops together. (Course this only works for the first several hundred mile locations. As I start branching out, Im gonna have to double up on the ites and ,make careful lists of what I want to see.

We used to have a really nice bus that was a diesel pusher and totally cost ineffective. We have since downsized to a 36 ft "Holiday Rambler" which has all the same amenities and its all living space for about 1/3 the cost. That frees up a truck for field tripping. Ill never buy a "Bus" again, Too much care and expense (even though we almost made all our money back from our Prevost which we bought as a used demo)
Joeblow
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Feb, 2009 02:33 pm
@farmerman,
Can see why you’d want a truck for forays. I checked out the Holiday Rambler’s " that looks like good living. We’ve bandied around the idea of renting something similar to scope out the Cabot Trail. One of these days…
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Feb, 2009 03:34 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman :

just leafing through the business pages . came across a report on gold mining in northern quebec .
i think that little video clip looks rather interesting - a bit down the page .

http://www.osisko.com/en/media-library.html?video=inferred_gold_2008.flv&player=vplayer2



0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Feb, 2009 08:53 am
@wandeljw,
Im looking for glacial varve s, kames, eskers, terminal m oraines, and erratic fields that lie clearly atop older formations so that the student can see both units. Ive got about 12 locations and will add those from Ill . Im going to have several problems with stratified srifts and esker trends for them to solve by photo analysis.
As I start adding ideas, my outline is getting kinda big.

Im off this week to see about my NJ/NY/Pa/Md contacts of the pre CAmbrian and Ordovician/Silurian (Martinburg/Shawangunk(Clinton) formations)

Im going to first do a road trip then document the locales by GPS and plot routes before I do any photoing. Ive noted that my photoing is gonna have to be limited to fall/winter/early spring in the East cause when leaves are full, you cant see many vistas except on "balds" or large roadcuts.
 

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