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Why would you bathe a cat?

 
 
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 04:49 pm
Unless it was full of fleas or got into something dire, is it necessary to bathe cats? I have had cats for 30 years and I have yet to bathe one, yet I see pics of bathed cats all the time. I can certainly think of happier and less dangerous pastimes.
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Type: Question • Score: 19 • Views: 5,753 • Replies: 43
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 04:53 pm
@mags314772,
I think I would do it, if I had the right facilities. Like a double sink and one of those hoses with a nozzle for rinsing. Cat'll often put up with a bath if it doesn't last too long, but if you've got to drain wash water before rinsing, the average cat can get pretty expressive.

As for why, my kids, especially the older, go outside and roll in the dirt. I mean, he lays on his back and writhes in the dust like a snake. You have to see to believe. Anyway, you can actually get your hands dirty from petting the wretched beast.
mags314772
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 04:55 pm
@roger,
Thanks Roger. Your cat is obviously an outdoor guy. My cats have always lived indoors. Perhaps that's the answer.
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Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 05:02 pm
We raised Siamese cats for years and one day daddy cat came down with a case of ring worms. Mama cat showed no evidence of ringworm but was very pregnant and we were interested to see that neither she nor the newborn kittens were infected.

So......per instructions from the vet, we had to bathe BOTH cats using medicated shampoo every day for a week. This was done in a plastic dishpan set in the sink.

The scars are hardly noticeable all these years later.
mags314772
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 05:04 pm
@Foxfyre,
I don't envy you. I had Siamese for years, and I would hate to think of bathing them.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 05:05 pm
@Foxfyre,
Foxfyre wrote:
The scars are hardly noticeable all these years later.


i was going to suggest that it would be a good test of reflexes and healing ability
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 06:05 pm
I've done it a few times, after being shown how. What I remember of it is - no fast movements, no big rush of running water, gently gently.. and the water was lukewarm. Have a towel wrap handy. Talk soothingly. In fact I don't remember it as being hard to do, and it can improve matters for people with cat allergies. Except it would be nice if it wasn't the person with the allergies doing the cat washing.

0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 06:09 pm
@mags314772,
We have Maine Coons. The breeder suggested bathing them monthly - fahgetaboutit!

One of our three does need an occasional bath. Once or twice a year. Here's how...

Quote:
How to bathe a Maine Coon Cat
I know, you are thinking soap, water, hockey mask, chain mail, and gloves right? Eh. there is a little more to it than that. You see Maine Coon cats have exceedingly fine dense fur and a LOT of oil glands to go with it. As a result, the fur is dang near impermeable to water. Washing them adequately using just soap and water is an exercise in frustration (not to mention death by a thousand cat scratches). Therefore more extreme measures must be taken.

Here are the supplies you will need:
1 jar original Goop hand cleaner
1 bottle of original ivory liquid dishwashing soap
1 gallon jug of white vinegar
1 bottle pet shampoo/baby shampoo
1 curry comb, waterproof
Optional equipment as needed:
personal protective equipment as required (gloves, chain mail, hockey mask, etc.)
sedatives (feline and/or human) as required.
plenty of gauze and turniquets as needed to staunch the flow of blood. more
mags314772
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 06:18 pm
@JPB,
Oh no. I have two Maine Coons. One is a year and a half and the other is 16 weeks. Does this mean.........bathing?
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 06:23 pm
@mags314772,
Depends on if you plan to show them (we don't) or on their particular fur. Only one of ours really ever needs it.
mags314772
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 06:40 pm
@JPB,
No show cats. Does that mean I may be off the hook? I can't afford the chain mail.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 06:46 pm
@mags314772,
It's lots cheaper if you get it from a meat cutter's supply house. They will also have chain mail gauntlets, but the mail only protects the back side of the hands and fingers.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 07:06 pm
@roger,
I think I've told this story on a2k before, but I once spent hours and maybe days on a large, intricate, pencil drawing, something on the order of 3 feet by 4 feet.

Margaret jumped on it and I had her off the drawing in less than a second. I can still see the white scar, about ten inches long, and that was in the early nineties..

On the other hand, the pitting from the drop of hydrochloric acid - not related to a cat episode, just an early chem class - has markedly diminished. I noticed that I couldn't see it any more about ten years ago. So, there's hope for my badge of cat lifting honor.

Adds, reminiscing, my dad had scars on his hand from being "bitten" by a recently dead shark on a boat in the Pacific for the length of his life. What the shark was doing there, I dunno.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 07:59 pm
I couldn't afford to lose that much blood - and the medical bills....

and the bloody cat would be straight back out there rolling in the dirt!

Although, Possum-cat, who does not like water, allowed me to bathe him, once.

He had some fleas, and I put one of those anti-flea drop thingies on the back of his neck. He had an almost immediate allergic reaction - and started to try and rip himself apart. I managed to grab him, with the help of my niece and a large towel, and take him into the bathroom, where I stood him in the vanity and ran lukewarm water over him. After a bit of a struggle, he must have realised that it wasn't itching as much with the water running, so he stood there quite patiently and let it run over him, until he decided he's had enough and the itching had stopped. He then let me dry him off until again he'd had enough and raced outside to roll in the dirt.
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 09:14 pm
I have two cats.
In fact, I have had cats all of my life.

They get regular baths.
They LIKE their baths. Both will purr, rub on me and relax in nice warm water.
They love getting scratched deep down in their hair, then combed after words.

I bathe them because it keeps them clean.
They walk in their own poo every day, drink from the toilet, play in the trash can ..e tc..
Why wouldnt I bathe that? Laughing
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 09:48 pm
@shewolfnm,
We wash our ragdoll maybe twice a year - he's pretty cool about it. The breeder said she has already washed our new maine coon kitty a few times and we should continue to do it regularly so that he isn't freaked out by it.
0 Replies
 
NickFun
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 10:17 pm
@shewolfnm,
Most cats hate getting wet and they are naturally clean. How have you trained your cats to enjoy the experience?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 10:39 pm
@NickFun,
Remember, some cats also like vacumn cleaners, too.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2009 10:50 pm
@shewolfnm,
You are an upside-down smiley face on the history of felinedome.

Mebbe it's cuz you got city cats, but...

Neither of mine drinks from the toilet, nor plays in the trash. (or would take a bath) I think your two need restructural manners training.

(are you sure those cats are not really ferrets, ... or otters?)

0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2009 02:23 am
Coz, it might actually be funny????

http://images.icanhascheezburger.com/completestore/2008/3/23/showerwatern128507551330000000.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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