7
   

Riots in Athens (Greece)

 
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 03:21 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

I've no idea what you are talking about.

But I'm rather sure that it has nothing to do with happens and happened in Greece.
And that's what my thread is about.


Au contraire. This is not "your" thread, like a car would be "your" car. This is a forum where you "offer" a topic for discussion, I believe. And, my "post" is "my post," regardless of whether you have some belief that you have hegemony over a thread. If you do not see the reason for my post, I am sorry; however, I will not post for the reading of everyone. I was replying to someone else anyway.

<Foofie makes a deep bow, turns an about face, and departs.>



cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 03:32 pm
@Foofie,
When Walter uses the pronoun "my," it's because he's the person who originated this thread. If you can't see past this simple interpretation, you should go to the local bar to look for a fight.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 03:34 pm
@Foofie,
Quote:
I just believe that the individual that you were having reparteee with is not appreciated for his good points.


Wha'? Huh? cjhsa has some good points? How come I never noticed?

hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 05:35 pm
I noticed someplace a few days ago that even before these riots Greece was in the group of nations that includes Iceland and Italy were national default was seen as a concern on the financial markets. If Greece was nearly bankrupt last week they must be in a worse situation now. Nations going into default is exactly what the global economy does not need right now. Can we all say ****!
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 05:42 pm
@Merry Andrew,
I believe that's in the plural "we." I wonder if Foofie would be kind enough to point out for "us" ceej's good points.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 05:45 pm
I am interested in any goings on in Greece, but not to the point that I've researched this probably complicated matter myself. So a plain old thank you to Walter.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 08:23 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

When Walter uses the pronoun "my," it's because he's the person who originated this thread. If you can't see past this simple interpretation, you should go to the local bar to look for a fight.


I do not go to bars. Nor, in my opinion, is it correct to say "my thread," based on your explanation above. It is therefore correct to say "this thread," I believe, because by saying "my thread" one can misconstrue that there is a belief in ownership; "this thread" eliminates the possibility of thinking anyone has hegemony over the thread . You need not explain the nuances of the language to me.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 10:02 pm
@Foofie,
Foo.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Dec, 2008 10:32 am
@Foofie,
I'm out here. May Foofie post what she/he wants.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Dec, 2008 01:03 pm
Greece's Foreign Minister Dora Bakoyannis was not surprised by last week's outbreak of violence on the streets of Athens. After all, she served as mayor of the city for three years. In an interview with Spiegel she argues that the government still needs to continue with tough reforms to bring Greece in line with the rest of the EU.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Dec, 2008 01:25 pm
@Foofie,
"My" is rhetorical. It has nothing to do with property ownership.

It's somewhat similar to your use of "my post."
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Dec, 2008 07:47 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

"My" is rhetorical. It has nothing to do with property ownership.

It's somewhat similar to your use of "my post."


You are posting in behalf of Walter? Or, just being a busy bee?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2008 12:22 am
http://i43.tinypic.com/2uppe6h.jpg
Quote:
Europe exists, it appears. If Greek students sneeze, or catch a whiff of tear-gas, young people take to the streets in France and now Sweden. Yesterday, masked youths threw two firebombs at the French Institute in Athens. Windows were smashed but the building was not seriously damaged. Then youths spray-painted two slogans on the building. One said, "Spark in Athens. Fire in Paris. Insurrection is coming". The other read, "France, Greece, uprising everywhere".
Full report
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Sun 4 Oct, 2009 06:03 pm
Quote:
ATHENS " Socialists won national elections in Greece on Sunday, trouncing a center-right government crippled by corruption scandals and a growing economic crisis.


With 65 percent of Greece’s 10 million votes counted, the Socialist Pasok Party was leading with 43.7 percent of the vote compared with 34.6 percent for the center-right New Democracy Party, a margin expected to give the Socialists their largest victory ever and a comfortable majority in Parliament.

“Today we set off together to build the Greece we want and need. We have no time to waste,” the Socialist leader, George Papandreou, said in his victory speech. “We want it, we can do it, we will succeed.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/world/europe/05greece.html?hp

The Greeks are ready for a little revolution....will the fever spread? Obviously, I hope so. We have been to patient for too long with corrupt corporate class rule.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 4 Oct, 2009 07:49 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

Quote:
ATHENS " Socialists won national elections in Greece on Sunday, trouncing a center-right government crippled by corruption scandals and a growing economic crisis.


With 65 percent of Greece’s 10 million votes counted, the Socialist Pasok Party was leading with 43.7 percent of the vote compared with 34.6 percent for the center-right New Democracy Party, a margin expected to give the Socialists their largest victory ever and a comfortable majority in Parliament.

“Today we set off together to build the Greece we want and need. We have no time to waste,” the Socialist leader, George Papandreou, said in his victory speech. “We want it, we can do it, we will succeed.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/05/world/europe/05greece.html?hp

The Greeks are ready for a little revolution....will the fever spread? Obviously, I hope so. We have been to patient for too long with corrupt corporate class rule.


Corruption exists in all economic/political systems, since corruption is a human trait, not a trait of a particular economic/political system.

The usual people, I believe, that would like to change to a new economic/political system are mostly those that are not doing so well in the current economic/political system. It is called feathering one's nest.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Oct, 2009 03:05 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

The usual people, I believe, that would like to change to a new economic/political system are mostly those that are not doing so well in the current economic/political system. It is called feathering one's nest.


How do you read that the political/economic system in Greece will change?
And why do you call voters who want a change in government "the usual people that ... . .... feathering one's nest."?
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Oct, 2009 06:47 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

Foofie wrote:

The usual people, I believe, that would like to change to a new economic/political system are mostly those that are not doing so well in the current economic/political system. It is called feathering one's nest.


How do you read that the political/economic system in Greece will change?
And why do you call voters who want a change in government "the usual people that ... . .... feathering one's nest."?


1) I have no interest in Greece.

2) You took my thought our of context. I said:

"The usual people, I believe, that would like to change to a new economic/political system are mostly those that are not doing so well in the current economic/political system. It is called feathering one's nest. "

So, it is not just change that I believe is the impetus to a particular vote oftentimes, but getting in a regime/government that will enhance one's position, economic or otherwise, aka, feathering one's nest. Do you need a history lesson in the Nazi party to see my point?

0 Replies
 
old europe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Oct, 2009 06:57 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
The usual people, I believe, that would like to change to a new economic/political system are mostly those that are not doing so well in the current economic/political system. It is called feathering one's nest.


No kidding. Kinda like the colonists hoped to gain something by staging that revolution against the British Crown. Always looking out for their personal advantage. No loyalty. It's a shame, really.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Oct, 2009 05:07 am
@old europe,
On the other hand, since Foofie seems to follow the idea of lebensraum in the west ...
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Oct, 2009 06:50 pm
@old europe,
old europe wrote:

Foofie wrote:
The usual people, I believe, that would like to change to a new economic/political system are mostly those that are not doing so well in the current economic/political system. It is called feathering one's nest.


No kidding. Kinda like the colonists hoped to gain something by staging that revolution against the British Crown. Always looking out for their personal advantage. No loyalty. It's a shame, really.


You say that while your profile says you are in New England?
0 Replies
 
 

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