7
   

Riots in Athens (Greece)

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Dec, 2008 09:33 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Following along.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 03:17 am
Greek cities, notably Athens, were hit by a third night of rioting as anger over the shooting dead of a teenage boy by police escalated. The BBC reports that the trouble is widening in scope, with crowds in the capital "attacking symbols of wealth and prestige", including hotels, banks and even the city's giant Christmas tree.

BBC report



http://i36.tinypic.com/14eccif.jpg
(Source: Greek newspaper 'Kathimerini', 09.12.08, page 2)

http://i35.tinypic.com/2em0w9z.jpg
(Source: Greek newspaper 'Eleftheros Tipos', 09.12.08, frontpage)
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 06:39 am
Why am I not surprised they targeted the Christmas tree?
0 Replies
 
Pamela Rosa
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 07:51 am
Quote:
December 6, 2008
ATHENS, Greece: Hundreds of migrants waiting to submit asylum applications rioted in downtown Athens on Saturday, setting fire to garbage bins and attacking passing cars.....

source:
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/12/06/europe/EU-Greece-Migrant-Riot.php
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 07:58 am
@Pamela Rosa,
Wow. Illegal immigrants rioting. What a surprise! I'm sure e_brown_piss would be pleased.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 09:54 am
@cjhsa,
Shocked Even the quoted article did't mention such.

Besides that, neither migration nor illegal immigration nor asylum rights are the topic here.

What our South-African Nazi member posted here has nothing to do with the riots.

And that is the topic of MY thread.
cjhsa
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 10:11 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Really Walt? So just who is rioting then? I'm so sick of you idiots who refuse to open your god damn eyes and instead want to analyze everything from an ivory tower of political correctness. YOU'RE INSANE - not me.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 10:15 am
@cjhsa,
Opposite to you, cjhsa, I follow the news. Not from an ivory tower but local (see the quotes above) as well as live reports.

I take it as a compliment that YOU call me insane, my dear √úBERNAZI.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 11:38 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter, That looks like the Archaeological Museum in Athens. T.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 01:09 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
That's what's wrong with the new Germany Walt... anyone with an opinion outside of the box is a ******* NAZI... can't you see the irony? Germany is still full of Nazis - you're one of them. You just don't know it.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 01:42 pm
@cjhsa,
Sometimes it's really hard for to remember that I've a degree and should know how to work with NGR's ...
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 01:45 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
You mean how to suppress free speech to advance your Nazi agenda?
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 01:59 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
If you stop responding to his taunts, he'll go away. He's a toothless little pup, but he gets his kicks yapping at people.
cjhsa
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 02:21 pm
Ahahahahaha. Toothless..... ask Blagojevich about that.....

It's called "get 'r done".
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2008 03:51 pm
Summing up events from today as done by IHT

Quote:
Thousands of mourners turned out here Tuesday for the funeral of a 15-year-old boy whose shooting death by police officers has tipped the country into its worst riots in decades, exposing the government's fragile hold on a deeply divided society.
[...]
Overall, the clashes Tuesday were seen as less intense than those Monday, when after dark hundreds of self-described anarchists broke the windows of upscale shops, banks and five-star hotels in central Athens and burned a large Christmas tree in the plaza in front of Parliament.

On Tuesday, rioters also fought with the police for the fourth day in a row in Salonika, the second-largest city in Greece, while in the port city of Patras, citizens trying to protect their shops came into conflict with rioters.

That the shooting death of a teenager, however tragic, could bring an entire country to its knees speaks to the deep political, social and economic unrest in Greece.

The center-right government of Prime Minister Kostas Karamanlis hangs by a one-vote majority in Parliament and is roiled by a corruption scandal in which two senior ministers have already resigned. Unemployment is high and the global recession hitting hard.

For the second day in a row Tuesday, students, teachers and workers used the demonstrations inspired by the death of Alexandros Grigoropolos, 15, to protest everything from school reforms to the grim economic situation.

Demonstrations, even violent ones, are nothing new in Greece, which has a long tradition of political protest and has been relatively tolerant of the self-described anarchist groups that routinely hold anti-government demonstrations.

Ever since the country shed its seven years of military dictatorship to became a democracy in the mid-1970s, the police have been seen as a throwback to the era of the military junta. Although Greece has a comparatively high ratio of more than 45,000 police for 10 million people, in the popular imagination, they are seen as ineffective and corrupt.
[...]
Indeed, Grigoropolos was shot Saturday night in the Athens neighborhood of Exarcheia, where youths routinely fight the police. The police have said Grigoropolos died when officers encountered a mob. But one officer has been charged with premeditated manslaughter in the case and another has been charged as an accomplice.

On Tuesday, thousands lined the street outside the cemetery and small, whitewashed chapel where Grigoropolos was buried in Paleo Faliro, a middle class residential neighborhood where he grew up. His father is a bank manager and his mother a jeweler.

Although the funeral passed peacefully, dozens of militants fought afterward with the police and smashed car windows, though no one was injured.

Earlier on Tuesday, two demonstrations of teachers, students and workers wound their way largely peacefully through central Athens. Once they neared the Parliament building, some students shouted "Down with the government of murderers" and "Let it burn, let it burn, the brothel, the Parliament." Other militants fought the police.

Before the rioting, Karamanlis was popular, even if his government was less so. He won by a wide margin in 2004, promising change after two decades of Socialist rule. He was re-elected in 2007, but his center-right party's lead fell to two votes in Parliament.

But in the autumn of 2008, the government was stung by a corruption scandal in which it was accused of selling a monastery that is prime Athens real estate before the 2004 Olympics in exchange for cheaper land elsewhere.

Last month, two top ministers resigned over reports of more than 250 land swaps and lawmakers unanimously agreed to start a special investigation. The scandals have deeply weakened Karamanlis's government and curbed his chances of implementing changes.

0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 11:12 am
Quote:
The police in Athens said they wanted de-escalation. Instead, following the Tuesday funeral for 15-year-old Alexandros Grigoropoulos, riots once again consumed the center of the Greek capital. Neither the police nor the anarchists seem interested in restoring calm.

Source and full report Addicted to Violence in Athens

Photo Gallery
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 02:58 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

If you stop responding to his taunts, he'll go away. He's a toothless little pup, but he gets his kicks yapping at people.


No. In my opinion, of the two of you, I would rather have him in a foxhole next to me in a war. I just think he does not view things in the manner of the left wing, and is willing to express those thoughts. Remember, left wing people only exist openly in a democracy, because people like him died in previous wars, I believe.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 03:02 pm
@Foofie,
And this is related exactly how to the riots in Greece?
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 03:07 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

And this is related exactly how to the riots in Greece?


Nice use of colloquial American English.

I just believe that the individual that you were having reparteee with is not appreciated for his good points. Without people with his feelings, we would not have been able to fight both World Wars. Perhaps, you do not see that from your perspective? I assume you would have been with the Allies in both wars.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Dec, 2008 03:10 pm
@Foofie,
I've no idea what you are talking about.

But I'm rather sure that it has nothing to do with happens and happened in Greece.
And that's what my thread is about.
 

Related Topics

THE BRITISH THREAD II - Discussion by jespah
FOLLOWING THE EUROPEAN UNION - Discussion by Mapleleaf
The United Kingdom's bye bye to Europe - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
Sinti and Roma: History repeating - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
[B]THE RED ROSE COUNTY[/B] - Discussion by Mathos
Leaving today for Europe - Discussion by cicerone imposter
So you think you know Europe? - Discussion by nimh
 
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 11/27/2021 at 06:40:36