0
   

Killer Cops Go Free (Surprise, Surprise)

 
 
Reply Fri 25 Apr, 2008 04:58 pm
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 2,687 • Replies: 31
No top replies

 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Apr, 2008 05:01 pm
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Apr, 2008 05:10 pm
they are protecting us edgar...

(I feel safer now, how 'bout you)

RH
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Apr, 2008 05:43 pm
What was the evidence regarding his car having hit the cop vehicle prior to the shoot out? Any idea?

I didn't know the defense could opt for a judge over a jury. That seems a bit odd in this case since the prosecutor, judge and cops would all basically be on the same "team."

I don't have all the facts, but assume there will be a civil case.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Apr, 2008 03:42 pm
In Harlem, Willie Rainey, 60, a Vietnam veteran and retired airport worker, said that he believed the detectives should have been found guilty, but that he saw the case through a prism not of race, but of police conduct. "It's a lack of police training," Mr. Rainey said. "It's not about race when you have black killing black. We overplay the black card as an issue."

Even near Liverpool Street and 94th Avenue in Jamaica, the very spot where Mr. Bell was killed, Kenneth Outlaw stood and spoke not only of the humanity of Mr. Bell but of the police as well. "A cop is a human being just like anyone else," said Mr. Outlaw, 52. "If I had to be out here, facing the same dangers the cops face, I'd be scared to death too."

New York controversies have a way of playing out along racial lines in a city that is diverse but often seems stratified. When Amadou Diallo, an unarmed West African immigrant, was killed by the police in a blast of 41 shots in the doorway of a Bronx apartment building in 1999, his death became shorthand for excessive police force against minorities.

Yet in the aftermath of the verdict in the Bell case, many black New Yorkers reacted not with outrage but with a muted reserve, saying that the city felt like a less polarized place in 2008, nearly a decade after the Diallo shooting and with a different mayor and police commissioner. Some also said that after a seven-week trial, the picture of what happened the night Mr. Bell, a black man, was killed was still murky, and so they left the public outcry to a relatively small group of black activists who had been closely monitoring the case.

There were those, however, who spoke of losing faith and trust in both law enforcement and the judicial system, and who saw the Bell case as a vivid example of how little has changed. "How many shots have to be fired for things to change?" asked Torell Marsalis, 35, of South Jamaica.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Apr, 2008 03:46 pm
Ignorant public.....surprise surprise Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Apr, 2008 04:19 pm
And the cultural divide goes on.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Apr, 2008 04:41 pm
squinney wrote:
What was the evidence regarding his car having hit the cop vehicle prior to the shoot out? Any idea?

I didn't know the defense could opt for a judge over a jury. That seems a bit odd in this case since the prosecutor, judge and cops would all basically be on the same "team."

I don't have all the facts, but assume there will be a civil case.


Defense choice. If you're guilty, you try to confuse the jury. If you are innocent, and have good evidence, you go for the judge. That's the general idea, anyway; don't know what went into the choice in this case
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Apr, 2008 07:42 pm
I don't know what I think, I don't know enough, re guilt as to criminality in the police response, or any other aspect re behavior of the people shot.

I do know I don't like the whole situation where such a barrage can happen.

I've never liked the shoot to kill thing, though I can understand it.

The whole us/them setup, a natural human mode, elevated as in this situation to potential for massacres from various sides - that mode sets scenes. It's a culture of mayhem, and the innocent can be victims. Not good for a functioning society. No, I've no idea how to fix that underlying situation.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Apr, 2008 07:47 pm
Neither do I. It was surprising to hear that 50 rounds represented about 10% of police shots fired in NYC. That comes to a rough total of 500 rounds in a densely populated city. Sounds like a lot, though each event gets investigated.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 01:16 am
Cops don't shoot to kill, they shoot to stop a threat.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 01:40 am
Which is exactly the philosophy you adopt if you have to defend yourself. It is, if you know what's good for you, anyway.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 01:45 am
Hi Roger Very Happy
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 01:45 am
Hey, TTH
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 01:54 am
The reason so many shots are fired is because a cop is not going to shoot his gun once, stop, and look to see if the threat has ceased. The cops train to shoot in rapid succession. It only takes a couple of seconds to empty a clip.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 04:54 am
Most cops are just doing their job when they shoot. Some cops are not.
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 08:33 am
TTH wrote:
The reason so many shots are fired is because a cop is not going to shoot his gun once, stop, and look to see if the threat has ceased. The cops train to shoot in rapid succession. It only takes a couple of seconds to empty a clip.



I disagree. 31 shots from one gun is excessive. I believe they said it was 10 times the norm. I believe that the police are under-trained. The adrenalin might have kicked in and he couldn't stop. One witness described the guy as 'going nuts' or some such phrase.

Nobody needs 31 bullets to be stopped.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Apr, 2008 09:49 am
edgarblythe
I agree with you about some are not just doing their job. Those need to get fired and prosecuted.

Mame I don't know the particulars of the story and the news likes to add and twist information. 31 shots can be from 2 clips and that only takes seconds.
You would be surprised at how many bullets some people can take and they still don't go down.

I just found this and it shows how fast events happen in seconds
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWqQZOyd84o
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 May, 2008 05:24 am
Those need to get fired and prosecuted.

Which is the topic of this thread.
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 May, 2008 07:43 am
Innocent until proven guilty, not guilty until proven innocent. That as I understand it is the law of the land. The prosecution simply could not prove their case. The witnesses against the officers were unreliable changing their accounts of what occurred. One to the DA and grand jury and another on the witness stand.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Killer Cops Go Free (Surprise, Surprise)
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 08/06/2020 at 08:26:31