287
   

What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Nov, 2019 10:40 pm
@Roberta,
December 1941 by Craig Shirley. The sub-title is, 31 days that changed America and saved the world. I'm curious about his period, because I was born during the middle of the Great Depression in 1935, and I was 6 years old when the war started. The US government put us Japanese Americans into concentration camps, and we were interred at Tule Lake in Northern CA for about three years. We lived in tar papered barracks with no paved roads, and you can imagine how we had to tread through mud during the winter months for meals and the toilets. In the late 1980's, the government sent us an apology and paid us $20,000 per person. No other country has ever apologized and paid reparations like the US. Even with this dark history, I'm glad to have been born in this country. Our grandfather escaped to Hawaii from Japan, because of the economic ruin of the country. The war years produced many movies about the war, and even one about the 442nd Infantry Battalion made up of Japanese Americans that was named, "Go For Broke." The biggest irony being, as we were couped up in concentration camps back home, the 442nd Infantry Battalion became the most decorated unit in US history. They fought in Europe, mostly in Italy, France and Germany. Many also served in the Pacific Theater as interpreters, translators, and spies for the allies. December 1941 should be interesting read for anyone interested in history for one month at the beginning of WWII.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2019 04:37 am
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

The sub-title is, 31 days that changed America and saved the world.


Sounds terrible. It wasn't just America who fought the Nazis you know, there was a whole coalition. We had been fighting them for over two years before you got involved.

The biggest ground changer was the Soviet Union's entry into the war, if any one event could have 'saved the world' it was that.

The first two significant, (non naval,) defeats of axis forces Stalingrad and El Alamein didn't involve American troops at all.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2019 12:40 pm
@izzythepush,
Yes, the US didn't want to get involved, but we were forced into it when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. Even before then, the US was providing war machines to England and Russia under "lend-lease." From my readings, it seems the US was paid back by 2008.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2019 01:15 pm
@cicerone imposter,
It was during Tony Blair's tenure that the wartime debt was finally paid off. I don't know the exact year.
0 Replies
 
BillW
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2019 01:22 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Quote:
Wikipedia:

The final payment of $83.3 million (£42.5 million), due on December 31, 2006 (repayment having been deferred in the allowed five years and during a sixth year not allowed), was made on December 29, 2006 (the last working day of the year). After this final payment Britain's Economic Secretary to the Treasury formally thanked the U.S. for its wartime support.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Nov, 2019 11:41 am
I'm reading a sci-fi novel on Wattpad. "I Don't Seem So Bright in a Well-Lit Room." Not sci-fi, actually, but a fantasy. Frenetic, funny, different from my usual fare.
Has many sentences like this: "He was so scarred that he had to wear protective goggles just to hold his eyeballs in."
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2019 07:51 am
The Spell of the Sensuous - Perception and Language in a More than Human World by David Abram
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2019 09:13 am
@hightor,
Currently reading (and enjoying) A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World by C.A. Fletcher.
Since my previous post:
The Saturday Night Ghost Club by Craig Davidson.
The Broken Vow (Spill Zone, #2 after rereading Vol.1) by Scott Westerfield
The manga version of I Want to Eat Your Pancreas by Yuro Sumino
Heavy Vinyl, Vol. 1 by Carly Usdin
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2019 10:08 am
@hightor,
I got sucked into the Abrams book after reading his last one on the natural world. That one was EXCELLENT, This one was a bit too much "fine writing" for me.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2019 10:59 am
@farmerman,
Interesting...I do get the sense that he's using a lot more words than necessary to make his point. (Of course, I'm guilty of that myself sometimes;I just enjoy putting words together.)
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Nov, 2019 04:49 am
@hightor,
Im an Elmore Leonard fan ,and that carries over to my text books and journals. I just love reading developd thoughts that are sparely set out.

"If I had more time I could have explained it simply"

hightor
 
  2  
Reply Tue 26 Nov, 2019 05:01 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
I just love reading developd thoughts that are sparely set out.

For sure; efficiency has its place. I take it you're not a fan of Joyce...or Proust? Very Happy
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Nov, 2019 09:36 am
@hightor,
nver read anything by Proust, Joyce, to me, was Ok . He at east had a tale, like Lovecraft(who is my fav gothic horror guy)

Reading techy papers where the authors tried more to impress rather than communicate.
I read this paper about (in my words), "We can miss the full geographic extent of fossils throughout their reported ranges but that does not mean they werent there".
That entire paper could have been summarized in that thought , and the authors could have presented some graphs to say "SEE?"

farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Apr, 2020 11:32 pm
@farmerman,
Just finished
The Last Grain Race-Eric Newby
Its a 1950's book on a guy who after some life slams gets on the last grain delivery by sail .Its really a song to the barque "Mushulu". Its a sail, (not a fully peaceful one" from the corn fields of AUstralia to the Atlantic .
I like sea adventures .This was almost as good as that Canadian Guy Joshua (forgot the last name) "Sailing Alone Around The World". Thats a sailing page turner. Its way bttr than Moby Dick, in which Mlville often just tries to impress us with his knowledge of whaling sail.

hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Apr, 2020 06:27 pm
Midway through the second of the N.K. Jemesin's Broken Earth trilogy 'Obelisk Gate' - worthy Hugo winner
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2020 03:38 am
@farmerman,
Goddam. Full name of author ofSailing Alone Around The World.Its JOSHUA SLOCUM. He rescued and rebuilt a gaff rigged fish'man sailboat and sailed around the world. I comapre it to Sea of Cortez ecxept alone

"Sailing Alone..." IMHO, is best experienced as an AUdioBook, its a great tale that should be told so an auf=dio book frees up more of your imagination
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2020 08:36 am
@farmerman,
Perchance, the audiobook isn't Christopher Cross' song on a loop?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2020 09:34 am
@tsarstepan,
oy, next to Enya's , Orinoco Flow, Christopher Cross
"Sailing" is one of the most puke inducing songs I know
0 Replies
 
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Apr, 2020 02:46 pm
I'm reading Dune by Frank Herbert, hoping to finish it before Warner Bros releases the first footage of the 2020 film adaptation.

Recently finished Vengeful by VE Schwab. It is a follow up to Vicious, which is about a superpowered criminal going after his former friend, a serial killer going after other superpowered people. Vengeful was ok, though the ending was unfulfilling.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Apr, 2020 02:30 am
Jack Tar, a book about the life of ordinary seamen aboard British warships like Nelson's HMS Victory. Lots of contemporary sources like sailor's letters, diaries, and journals are used. Fascinating.
 

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