283
   

What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Oct, 2011 04:48 pm
@tsarstepan,
of course
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Oct, 2011 04:54 pm
@djjd62,
I encourage you to read Perdido Street Station and the other New Crobuzon novels (I've seen them referred to as The Bas-Lag series). The guy's imagination is incredibly vast.

I can also recommend King Rat which is something of a slightly more twisted and hip Neil Gaiman.

Have you read Kraken? Mieville has announced that he intends to write at least one novel in every genre under the sun. Kraken is Urban Fantasy, and although I've enjoyed much of what I've read of it, I can't seem to finish it. I think Set posted that he's very reluctant to put aside any book he's started, and I'm exactly the same, but I'm struggling across the finish line with Kraken. It's as if Mieville's imagination vomited and Kraken was at the center of the puddle. Some great characters, but a lot that's just a mess and plain silly. Jonathan Barnes does it better with The Somnambulist.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Oct, 2011 05:01 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
If you ever feel for one moment that you should dump the book you should dump the book. Shite is shite and can be recognised easily.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Oct, 2011 05:28 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
i've read some less than favourable reviews of Kraken (i have an ebook of it ,but haven't read it yet)

i couldn't get into The Sonambulist for some reason, might try again some time

gonna start Perdido et al, when i finnish the first 4 Fire and Ice books (unless the 5th is out in paperback by then, then i'll buy and read it)
GracieGirl
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 07:20 pm
@djjd62,
The Girls by Lori Lansens. Its about these 29 year old twins that are stuck together by the head. Sorta like this: http://www.google.com/imgres?q=craniopagus+twins&um=1&hl=en&sa=N&rlz=1C1RNCM_enUS426US426&biw=1280&bih=677&tbm=isch&tbnid=bXQPCKPMBkTG9M:&imgrefurl=http://bitsandpieces.us/2010/06/15/twins-who-share-a-brain/&docid=3EJ5nOI-tyXxxM&imgurl=http://bitsandpieces.us/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/imagestwins-with-1-brain.jpg&w=500&h=281&ei=3nafTtyZLKfisQLX97mpBQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=447&vpy=293&dur=428&hovh=168&hovw=300&tx=182&ty=104&sig=114847934160058452807&page=2&tbnh=146&tbnw=234&start=18&ndsp=17&ved=1t:429,r:13,s:18

Its super interesting.!
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Oct, 2011 10:15 pm
@GracieGirl,
Your image link didn't work for me. I think you wanted to show us this:

http://bitsandpieces.us/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/imagestwins-with-1-brain.jpg
GracieGirl
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 12:24 am
@Thomas,
Oh! Thanks! Very Happy
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 11:13 am
@GracieGirl,
1493 as an e-book, and WORM (about malware and the conficker virus in particular).

I loved 1493
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 11:30 am
For my next reading adventure...trying to decide between The Art of Dancing in the Rain (based on Osso's enthusiastic comments). Or...Unsaid (based on reviews). Or...The Dovekeepers (based on Mags' review here).

And a book about dogs and what they're really thinking...can't remember the exact name of it at the moment.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Oct, 2011 11:37 am
@ehBeth,
still
ehBeth wrote:

reading Greg Mortenson's Three Cups of Tea.


good transit reading
0 Replies
 
scottaleger
 
  0  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 01:14 am
@littlek,
I am reading now "The Secret" by Rhonda Byrne .....
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 01:29 am
I've been watching a lot of films on DVD lately, which has impacted on the amount of reading I'd usually indulge in.
Terrific films, which I've really enjoyed, but I think I'll have to cut back on my viewing. I'm really missing reading a good book.

I've also been listening to Anna Karenina, via audio book.
I read it years ago, but am really appreciating a really good reading of it.

0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 01:44 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
King Rat? Is that the King Rat written by James Clavell? If it is, I recommend all his stuff. Since titles are not covered by copyright, it may be a different one, but I still recommend his stuff.

I know you mentioned Neil Gaiman, but wasn't sure if that was the author, or just a comparison.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 01:57 am
@roger,
Agreed, Roger. For a hack, Clavell had some talent. And his historical stuff (e.g. Shogun or Tai Pan) are well researched.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 02:44 am
I'm now reading Chronicle of Youth which is the diary of Vera Brittain for 1913-17. It's very sad, although not necessarily depressing. Her brother, her lover and just about every young man of her acquaintance who is her age or near her age is killed in that war. Small wonder Vera Brittain became a pacifist.

I have reached the part where she leaves Oxford and takes up nursing.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_VwPzfj0aeIg/S65UPCL3jcI/AAAAAAAABBY/frdRAuTLKhA/s1600/Vera+Brittain.jpg

spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 04:56 am
@Setanta,
Aaaaaahh!!!
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 04:23 pm
@roger,
It's a different one written by China Mieville, wherein the title is more literal.

I like Clavell a lot too though.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 04:48 pm
@Irishk,
I often don't like pushed books.. like books as surprises
so forget dancing in the rain (smiles)

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 04:52 pm
@Setanta,
Sounds like a book I'll read.



0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Oct, 2011 05:20 pm
700 Sundays by actor/writer, producer/ comedian Billy Crystal.

Very interesting autobiographical story of his fascinating family and their dynamics. As his dad passed on whn Billy was the age of 15, the title refers to the number of Sundays that Billy and his father were able to share. (The Tony-award-winning stage production came first around 2005.)

They're involved (from the late '20s - 50s) with the entertainment industry ... particulary promoting the jazz, swing and dixieland jazz greats as his uncle and dad ran a music store Commodore Music Store and the Commodore Records (jazz industry's #1) record label. He hung out from the age of 5 yrs with the likes of Louis Armstrong, Billy Holliday, etc. His family and their record company, Commodore, was primarily responsible for many of the jazz and swing greats like Billie Holliday (Strange Fruit) for getting recordings written and produced that might never have seen the light of day.

Wonderfully fast read.
 

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