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Leonid Storm Tues 19th

 
 
quinn1
 
Reply Thu 14 Nov, 2002 05:19 pm
Seems like the Leonid Meteor Showers are forcasted to be more like a storm this go around, scheduled for this Tuesday with best viewing 11:30-1 am and 4am- dawn with clear skies here in Boston!

Happy viewing Very Happy
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 9,142 • Replies: 66
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Nov, 2002 08:05 pm
Oh, Thank you very much for the "Heads-Up"!!!

I'll be with SeattleFriend that night... of course, clear skies are not so likely here in the cloudy upper left hand corner.
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 01:46 pm
I'm looking forward to my date with Leonid.

Oops, I hope Mr. Jespah doesn't read that and get the wrong idea. :wink:
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bandylu2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 08:43 pm
Is this the same meteor that was here a year or so ago? If it is, hubby and I got up (well I got up, he was already up) at about 4 a.m. and drove down to the beach to see them and it was absolutely beautiful and worth losing a couple of hours of sleep (which is my ultimate compliment).
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 10:38 pm
Not the same meteor shower, bandylu, but can't remember the particulars (even name) of last year's event. Tomorrow I am going to do some serious research on this and post some NASA sites that I have stashed away somewhere that should be interesting.

sumac
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bandylu2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2002 10:48 pm
sumac -- I did a little research of my own, and I think it was Leonid.

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/astronomy/leonids_wrap_011118.html

That's from November 2001 and it was on a Sunday which makes sense since I wouldn't have been able to go see it on a workday.
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sumac
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Nov, 2002 11:16 am
Here's a reasonably good treatment about the event:
Quote:

Meteor Storm Set to Dazzle Stargazers

By Patricia Reaney

LONDON (Reuters) - Stargazers in Europe, Britain and North America are in for a treat next week and have prime viewing positions for what could be the biggest natural fireworks display of the 21st century.

During the early hours of Nov. 19, thousands of meteors, or shooting stars, will light up the night sky as they enter the atmosphere at speeds of about 160,000 miles per hour.

"It is a natural fireworks display, a celestial spectacle," professor Mark Bailey, of the Armagh Observatory in Northern Ireland, told Reuters Friday.

Known as the Leonids because they originate in the constellation Leo, the meteor storm will occur in two bursts during the night of Nov. 18 to 19.

Britain and Europe will have the best views for the first burst of the shower that scientists predict will occur at about 10:30 p.m. EST and residents in North America are best placed to see the second barrage at about 5:30 a.m. EST.

"You have two components to the shower, two parts of the world that are potentially able to observe it," Bailey added.

Although a full moon might dull the spectacle a bit, this year's storm could be the biggest for the next 100 years, with 1,000 meteors per hour trailing across the sky in the first burst and as many as 6,000 per hour during the second.

"The U.S. is better off than we are but on the other hand a thousand in an hour is probably more than most people see in a lifetime," Bailey said.

METEORIC DEBRIS

Meteors are bits of rock and dust that hit the Earth's atmosphere, heat up and glow. Most vaporize as they descend but some explode.

The Leonids are debris from the comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. About every 33 years the comet returns to the inner solar system and releases materials that form new dust trails that stretch from the comet many millions of miles away.

The comet is due to return to the inner solar system around 2033 and 2066 but the meteor storms are not expected to be as spectacular.

"The Earth just happens to be going through this very fine trail of meteoric debris. That trail that we run into at four in the morning Tuesday the 19th was emitted during its passage around the sun in 1767," Bailey said.

The trail the Earth will pass through during the second part of the storm was emitted 1866.

Thanks to calculating techniques developed by David Asher, of the Armagh Observatory, and Robert McNaught, of the Australian National University, Bailey said, meteor storm prediction has become more precise.

"If the weather forecast sounds like it may be vaguely clear, it will be well worth it," he said.




11/15/02 14:36 ET

Copyright 2002 Reuters Limited.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Nov, 2002 11:50 am
The Dust "Trails of a Comet... some of them centuries old." Shocked

I wonder if there are any virus or bacterial phages in that dust? I suppose they'd burn up.
0 Replies
 
quinn1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Nov, 2002 07:17 pm
Glad you all stopped in are excited about seeing this Smile
Thanks sumac for finding and posting the article.
Today I saw it might be cloudy here so, Im hoping the weatherpeople are wrong for once.
0 Replies
 
bandylu2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Nov, 2002 07:42 pm
Odds are the weatherpeople will be wrong. Aren't they always wrong?
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quinn1
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Nov, 2002 08:32 pm
Yes bandylu..they are...and yes, they will continue to be
<at least until forever I think>
I will certainly keep my fingers crossed !
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Nov, 2002 10:14 pm
Yup, Leonid here both last year and this year again, and then not again for another 30 odd years. Wonder why. Two years in a row and then disappears for a while. Were they pulled into our orbit and then will be sling-shot out again?

Best viewing down here in the SE will be 4 till dawn hours, which I just might make. Laughing

sumac
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 07:52 am
I thought that if they were dust trails, as described, then they are in a static spot within our revolving, gravitating solar system. We fly through them, not them through our earth's orbit. Since they were made by a comet that was encircling the sun, the trails are probably parallel orbits and reasonably close together.

Huh??? Whadya think?
0 Replies
 
quinn1
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 04:13 pm
Our orbit changes with relation to objects both static and orbital themselves, so we shall either intersect with their orbit or our orbit will disect their static environment.
Was that what you asked??
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JerryR
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 04:29 pm
Ya mean I get to watch them on the ride into work!!! Laughing Laughing
0 Replies
 
quinn1
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 04:35 pm
We can only hope Jerry! Let me know how they look then, I plan on doing the other time frame viewing, prolly be up anywho Smile
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 06:45 pm
I think the comet left trails that are not orbiting, but I dinna know for sure. As far as I understand everything is moving... it's a little alarming, really!

Jerry, you must go to work pretty early!
0 Replies
 
quinn1
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 06:51 pm
Piffka, due to gravity and such, actually yes, everything would be moving. However, some items have an orbit of their own, other objects are orbiting due to other effects.

<he does..much too early for me to even think of!>
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 07:01 pm
Do you think that the dust trails are orbiting?

Excluding all the movements from the solar system and galatic orbiting that we aren't supposed to notice.
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Nov, 2002 07:39 pm
What I would like to understand is what causes the variability of if and when these objects come into our view? Once a year two years in a row, and then not again for 33 years? I'm off to find one of those NASA sites I stashed away someplace.
0 Replies
 
 

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