2
   

The 80th sashay through the Rainforest!

 
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Oct, 2007 06:46 am
Early, but, all clicked... Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Oct, 2007 02:10 pm
Beautiful Autumn day for the Sierra's! Very Happy

Stradees back went kerplunk but view from the porch, rest, and motrins i'll be good as new {well, almost at this age} for work tomorrow.

Plus a surprise from the post today from a lovely friend ~ bella gracia.

Good Day wishes to all wildclickers
0 Replies
 
teenyboone
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Oct, 2007 06:21 pm
Rain Forest
danon5 wrote:
Early, but, all clicked... Very Happy

Rejoining, because I just found you guys! I'm all clicked too! Cool
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Oct, 2007 08:00 pm
hi Teeny! good to see you

I need to check in my system and see if I have your e-ddress so I can let you know when you zoom along

... speaking of which ... who's on for the next thread?

~~~

mebbe one of the lurkers could take a round?

~~~

You and your 300 friends have supported 2,809,634.2 square feet!

~~~

1 Aktbird57 .. 1948 64.497 acres


~~~

Just listened to the most fascinating radio documentary on the CBC on how we choose to remember and forget, and the processes involved.
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 11:25 am
That does sound interesting, ehBeth! Although at a certain age, people forget everything ~ and recall only the important things such as...'where are my keys and where is the vehicle parked'! That and caller I.D

The rest are nudges from the Universe ~ and the herd. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 04:33 pm
You picked one of the examples they talked about, and hinted at another, stradee.

People park their cars hundreds of times a year. They have to remember where the car is each time. How do they 'lose' the old irrelevant information, and only remember the current info they need?

and the phone. You want to call someone. Someone else has the number. They tell you - you remember the number long enough to make the call - but can't recall what that number is a moment or two later.

Really interesting stuff, this study of memory.

~~~

You and your 300 friends have supported 2,810,008.8 square feet!

~~~

1 Aktbird57 .. 1949 64.505 acres
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 04:36 pm
in today's email

~~~

The Pastor's Ass


The pastor entered his donkey in a race and it won.
The pastor was so pleased with the donkey that he entered it in the race again, and it won again.

The local paper read:


PASTOR'S ASS OUT FRONT.


The Bishop was so upset with this kind of publicity that he ordered
the pastor not to enter the donkey in another race.


The next day, the local paper headline read:


BISHOP SCRATCHES PASTOR'S ASS.

This was too much for the bishop, so he ordered the pastor to get
rid of the donkey.

The pastor decided to give it to a nun in a nearby convent.
The local paper, hearing of the news, posted the following headline
the next day:


NUN HAS BEST ASS IN TOWN.


The bishop fainted.
He informed the nun that she would have to get rid of the donkey, so
she sold it to a farmer for $10.
The next day the paper read:


NUN SELLS ASS FOR $10.


This was too much for the bishop, so he ordered the nun to buy back
the donkey and lead it to the plains where it could run wild.


The next day the headlines read:


NUN ANNOUNCES HER ASS IS WILD AND FREE.


The bishop was buried the next day.

The moral of the story is . . . being concerned about public opinion
can bring you much grief and misery . . even shorten your life.

So be yourself and enjoy life.
Stop worrying about everyone else's ass and you'll be a lot happier and live longer!
0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 05:30 pm
BAG = BIG ASSED GRIN !!

Good one ehBeth..... Very Happy

----------
Christmas Eve - Italian Style



I thought it would be a nice idea to bring a date to my parents' house on Christmas Eve. I thought it would be interesting for a non-Italian girl to see how an Italian family spends the holidays. I thought my mother and my date would hit it off like partridges and pear trees. So, I was wrong. Sue me.


I had only known Karen for three weeks when I extended the invitation. "I know these family things can be a little weird," I told her, "but my folks are great, and we always have a lot of fun on Christmas Eve."


"Sounds fine to me," Karen said.


I had only known my mother for 31 years when I told her I'd be bringing Karen with me. "She's a very nice girl and she's really looking forward to meeting all of you."


"Sounds fine to me," my mother said.


And that was that. Two telephone calls. Two sounds-fine-to-me. What more could I want?


I should point out, I suppose, that in Italian households, Christmas Eve is the social event of the season - an Italian woman's raison d'etre. She cleans. She cooks. She bakes. She orchestrates every minute of the entire evening. Christmas Eve is what Italian women live for. I should also point out, I suppose, that when it comes to the kind of women that make Italian men go nuts, Karen is it. She doesn't clean. She doesn't cook.. She doesn't bake. And she has the largest breasts I have ever seen on a

human being. I brought her anyway.


7p.m. - we arrive .


Karen and I walk in and putter around for half an hour waiting for the other guests to show up. During that half hour, my mother grills Karen like a cheeseburger and cannily determines that Karen does not clean, cook, or bake. My father is equally observant. He pulls me into the living room and notes, "She has the largest breasts I have ever seen on a human being."


7:30p.m. - Others arrive.


Uncle Ziti walks in with my Aunt Mafalde, assorted kids, assorted gifts. We sit around the dining room table for antipasto, a symmetrically composed platter of lettuce, roasted peppers, black olives, salami, prosciutto, provolone, and anchovies. When I offer to make Karen's plate she says, "Thank you. But none of those things, okay?" She points to the anchovies. "You don't like anchovies?" I ask. "I don't like fish," Karen announces to one and all as 67 other varieties of foods-that-swim are baking, broiling and simmering in the next room. My mother makes the sign of the cross. Things are getting uncomfortable.


Aunt Mafalde asks Karen what her family eats on Christmas Eve. Karen says, "Knockwurst." My father, who is still staring in a daze, at Karen's chest, temporarily snaps out of it to murmur, "Knockers?" My mother kicks him so hard he gets a blood clot. None of this is turning out the way I'd hoped.


8:00p.m. - Second course.


The spaghetti and crab sauce is on the way to the table. Karen declines the crab sauce and says she'll make her own with butter and ketchup. My mother asks me to join her in the kitchen. I take my "Merry Christmas" napkin from my lap, place it on the "Merry Christmas" tablecloth and walk into the kitchen. "I don't want to start any trouble," my mother says calmly, clutching a bottle of ketchup in her hands. "But if she pours this on my pasta, I'm going to throw acid in her face."


"Come on," I tell her. "It's Christmas. Let her eat what she wants." My mother considers the situation, then nods. As I turn to walk back into the dining room, she grabs my shoulder. "Tell me the truth," she says, "are you serious with this tramp?" "She's not a tramp," I reply. "And I've only known her for three weeks." "Well, it's your life", she tells me, "but if you marry her, she'll poison you."


8:30p.m. - More fish.


My stomach is knotted like one of those macrame plant hangers that are always three times larger than the plants they hold. All the women get up to clear away the spaghetti dishes, except for Karen, who, instead, lights a cigarette.


"Why don't you give them a little hand?" I politely suggest. Karen makes a face and walks into the kitchen carrying three forks.


"Dear, you don't have to do that," my mother tells her, smiling painfully. "Oh, okay," Karen says, putting the forks on the sink. As she reenters the dining room, a wine glass flies over her head, and smashes against the wall. From the kitchen, my mother says, "Whoops." I vaguely remember that line from Torch Song Trilogy. "Whoops?" No. "Whoops is when you fall down an elevator shaft.."


More fish comes out. After some goading, Karen tries a piece of scungilli, which she describes as "slimy, like worms." My mother winces, bites her hand and pounds her chest like one of those old women you always see in the sixth row of a funeral home. Aunt Mafalde does the same.


Karen, believing that this is something that all Italian women do on Christmas Eve, bites her hand and pounds her chest. My Uncle Ziti doesn't know what to make of it. My father's dentures fall out and chew a six-inch gash in the tablecloth.


10:00p.m. - Coffee, dessert.


Espresso all around. A little anisette. A curl of lemon peel When Karen asks for milk, my mother finally slaps her in the face with cannoli. I guess it had to happen sooner or later. Karen, believing that this is something that all Italian women do on Christmas Eve, picks up cannoli and slaps my mother with it.


"This is fun," Karen says. Fun? No. Fun is when you fall down an elevator shaft. But, amazingly, everyone is laughing and smiling and filled with good cheer - even my mother, who grabs me by the shoulder, laughs and says, "Get this bitch out of my house."


Sounds fine to me.

THE END


If you haven't laughed by now, you don't know Italians! Cause there is only two types of people in the world...Italians...and People who wish they where Italian. You betta believe it!!!
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 07:28 pm
Astronomers See Second Earth in the Making

Ker Than
Staff Writer
SPACE.com
Wed Oct 3, 10:00 AM ET



Astronomers have spotted evidence of a second Earth being built around a distant star 424 light-years away.


Using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, astronomers have spotted a huge belt of warm dust swirling around a young star called HD 113766 that is just slightly larger than our sun. The dust belt, which scientists suspect is clumping together to form planets, is located in the middle of the star system's terrestrial habitable zone where temperatures are moderate enough to sustain liquid water. Scientists estimate there is enough material in the belt to form a Mars-sized world or larger.


At approximately 10 million years old, the star is just the right age for forming rocky planets, the researchers say. Their finding will be detailed in an upcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal.


"The timing for this system to be building an Earth is very good," said study team member Carey Lisse, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Baltimore, Md.


If the star system were too young, the planet-forming disk would be full of gas, and it would be making gas-giant planets like Jupiter instead. If it was too old, Spitzer would have spotted rocky planets that had long ago formed.


The star system also has the right mix of dusty materials in its disk to form an Earth-like planet, Lisse said.


Using Spitzer's infrared spectrometer instrument, the team determined that the material around HD 113766 is more processed than the snowball-like stuff that makes up infant solar systems and comets, which are considered cosmic "refrigerators" because they contain pristine ingredients from the solar system's formative period. But it is also not as processed as the stuff found in mature planets and asteroids.


"The material mix in this belt is most reminiscent of the stuff found in lava flows on Earth," Lisse said. "I thought of Mauna Kea [in Hawaii] material when I first saw the dust composition in this system - it contains raw rock and it's abundant in iron sulfides, which are similar to fool's gold."


Earlier this year, scientists announced they had discovered one, and possibly two, already formed Earth-like planets around Gliese 581, a dim red star located only 20.5 light-years away. The planets, called Gliese 581c and Gliese 581d, are located at about the right distance from their star to support liquid water and life as we know it, but many more observations are needed to confirm this.


To date, planet hunters have discovered more than 250 extrasolar planets, or "exoplanets." Most of the distant worlds, however, are giant gas planets several times the size of Jupiter.
0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 09:38 pm
If you are upset about the latest Bush veto - you can do something about it at this site - http://www.democrats.org/page/speakout/RejectBush

I told my congressman and both senators that I thought Bush was wrong to begin the war in Iraq before he started it - he had forced the issue way too heavily - and that he did it to get wealth from the oil. And, his father is getting wealth from selling arms to small countries. I also told them that he had abandonded the real war against the terrorists who attacked us - in Afganistan - and, that future history will expose them all for what they are. Including the congressman and both senators to whom I sent the emails.
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Oct, 2007 09:47 pm
Clicked.

click: http://rainforest.care2.com
(i find the link posted every now and then muy helpful - usually makes the difference between clicking and not for me)
0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Oct, 2007 04:16 am
I still am unable to find the time to develop a computer routine.

Lawmakers Will Proceed on Climate Plan
Leaders Focus on System of Tradable Allowances for Greenhouse Gas Emissions

By Juliet Eilperin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, October 4, 2007; A04



Legislative leaders in the House and Senate said yesterday that they plan to press ahead with proposals to limit U.S. emissions linked to global warming, focusing on mandatory, economy-wide caps of the kind that President Bush explicitly rejected last week in a climate conference he hosted.

While the bills are less ambitious than many climate scientists and environmental activists have wanted, they indicate that Congress plans to press ahead with a sweeping climate change proposal despite the president's opposition.

Yesterday, Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee issued a white paper outlining a cap-and-trade system that would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60 percent to 80 percent below current levels. Under the system envisioned by Chairman John D. Dingell (D-Mich.) and a key subcommittee chairman, Rick Boucher (D-Va.), the federal government would distribute greenhouse gas allowances that could be bought and sold, though the lawmakers left open the possibility of using taxes as well.

It remains unclear how much Republican support Dingell and Boucher's proposal will enjoy in the House, and when legislation might advance. Asked whether GOP members backed the plan, Dingell spokeswoman Jodi Seth responded in an e-mail, "You'll have to check with the Republicans."

Boucher has vowed to work with his GOP counterpart on the subcommittee on energy and air quality, former speaker J. Dennis Hastert (Ill.), but Hastert spokeswoman Lulu Blacksmith said her boss had not taken a position and "is in the process of reviewing the document."

The Senate Committee on the Environment and Public Works plans to move a bipartisan bill through committee in December, at a time when international climate negotiators will be meeting in Bali. Chairwoman Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) will lead a Senate delegation to the talks along with John F. Kerry (D-Mass.).

"Moving global warming legislation is a top priority," Boxer said in a statement. "I am optimistic that we can get a strong global warming bill through the subcommittee very soon and through the full committee by the end of the year."

The panel plans to take up a cap-and-trade bill authored by Sens. Joseph I. Lieberman (I-Conn.) and John W. Warner (R-Va.) that includes a Federal Reserve-style board to help contain the costs imposed on carbon emitters and aims for a 70 percent cut in greenhouse gas emissions from current levels by 2050. It also will take up several other climate bills with both deeper and more modest emissions cuts.

Environmental advocacy groups welcomed these overtures. Steve Cochran, national climate campaign director for Environmental Defense, said yesterday's white paper "appears to be a serious attempt by Chairmen Dingell and Boucher to take the initial steps toward developing comprehensive climate legislation in the House."

David D. Doniger, policy director of the Natural Resources Defense Council's Climate Center, said that while he and other environmentalists back an 80 percent reduction in greenhouse gases, Dingell and Boucher's blueprint amounts to "a very constructive opening move."

However, Lee Fuller, vice president of government relations at the Independent Petroleum Association of America, said lawmakers have underestimated the challenge of reaching their reduction targets by assuming that as many as 145 new nuclear power plants will come online by 2030.

"Is that realistic? Our sense is no," Fuller said.
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Oct, 2007 01:00 pm
Laughing

Good ones, ehBeth and Dan!

True Story ~

A dear family friends husband died, so she decided after a year, to take a trip to Italy. With much encouragemnet from family and friends, she decided a nice vacation just what the doctor ordered. note: Italians must wait one year after a spouse dies before smiling. It's a rule.

Arrival in Italy ~ she calls her sons and tells them the weathers fine, and has decided to extend her vacation. Three months.

She arrives home, there we all are at the airport {pre-laden} waiting at the gate, Italian arms waving when the door of the plane opens - and there is our friend in a wheel chair.

In Italy one day, she gets plowed down by a passenger car {surprise} lands in hospital with a broken leg and wrenched back.

So there we are all talking at once -"My God, what happened"! from her sons "Ma, you coulda called"! from her brother "Jeezus chrito" - and from the lady in the chair?...

Waving her good arm she says "I don't wanna talk about it"! but surprisingly she's smiling???

Apparently the surgeon, who to this day remains nameless, and Matilda became very good friends.

mysterious ways...
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Oct, 2007 01:14 pm
sue, if the u.s bombs Iran??? We won't need be concerned with global warming...ever.

Dan, the latest veto proved beyond doubt that gwb has completely gone out of his mind. His reasonings? The bill is not cost efficient!
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Oct, 2007 07:42 pm
You and your 300 friends have supported 2,810,430.2 square feet!

~~~

1 Aktbird57 .. 1950 64.516 acres


~~~

www.care2.com
0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Oct, 2007 09:41 pm
Clicked early this morn - waiting to see if a "lurker" would appear. Tomorrow I will start a new thread.

Aw done.
0 Replies
 
teenyboone
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Oct, 2007 06:23 am
Cool Just letting you know, that I'm all clicked for the day & yesterday! :wink:
0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Oct, 2007 08:50 am
Hi teeny, good to see ya.

Hey, everyone - here is the link to the 81st thread - - - - -

http://www.able2know.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=2885450#2885450
0 Replies
 
teenyboone
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Oct, 2007 09:47 am
danon5 wrote:
Hi teeny, good to see ya.

Hey, everyone - here is the link to the 81st thread - - - - -

http://www.able2know.org/forums/viewtopic.php?p=2885450#2885450


Cool Glad to be back!
0 Replies
 
 

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