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What is the best hardwood for home furniture?

 
 
maisondeco
 
  0  
Reply Fri 23 Oct, 2015 03:32 am
@alexhigins,
teak... use teak, or Indian rosewood for your furnishing
0 Replies
 
poojaraj
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Oct, 2015 03:21 am
Birch is the best quality and look wise as well.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Oct, 2015 07:32 am
@poojaraj,
WORKMANSHIP over the materials any day. Ive seen beautiful works of painted furniture made of poplar skid lumber (limewood-basswood), and some really UGLY pieces of carved mahogany furniture that has all the secondary qwoods the same as the carcass and it looks disgusting and cruse.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 27 Oct, 2015 07:33 am
@poojaraj,
birch is good for modern cabinetry and bent wood chairs, but only if made well.
0 Replies
 
alextabrizi78
 
  0  
Reply Tue 1 Dec, 2015 05:11 am
Teak wood is best for all types of furniture making it strong and give well finishing to furniture.
0 Replies
 
ulinka
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 24 Feb, 2016 08:23 am
@alexhigins,
I use for my house oak.
Good wood and quality!
0 Replies
 
tungkhanh9
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Feb, 2016 10:42 pm
Toilets should use wood to interior design?
0 Replies
 
NicholesAmmons
 
  0  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 03:05 am
@alexhigins,
I'm listing few well known wood types. Take a look:
1.Teak:
-Very good for out-door furniture
-highly weather resistant and beautiful
-it's rather becoming rarer and is very costly too
-really nice composition of grain when it comes to hardness

2.Cedar:
-commonly used type of cedar is the western cedar
-good resistance against moist environment
-moderately priced

3.Pine:
-types: white, yellow, sugar etc.
-great for making furniture

4.Ash:
-very hard and could be rated a 4 on a scale of 5
-very easy to work with
-you'd find to it difficult to find it at the local home center, mostly available at the big lumberyards

5.Oak:
-one of the most used furniture woods out there
-hardness is really good and generally the white variety of this wood is used for furniture making

There are many more types, more than what could be mentioned over here. However, in my entire career as a Production worker at Austin Furniture Repair, I have seen these being some of the more favored types for furniture.
Hope it helps!
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 03:17 am
You don't want to use teak. The East India Company learned not to use teak in building their "country-built" ships. When fighting off pirates, they found that the splinter wounds from teak quickly went septic. Use the wood of the neem tree--it has many healthy properties and contains natural antibiotics.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 04:48 am
@Setanta,
Teak is still superior as a decking material for some of those properties youve mentioned. A teak over oak frame decking is the most non-skid surface for walking about on a wooden boat. (Even fiberglas decking exfoliates into tinyshards that can quickly become infected if one has gotta walk barefoot on deck). Thats usally why fiberglas boats have rubber inserts or carpeting on high inpact areas
The problem with teak is that people OVER -MAINTAIN IT. It shouldnt be oiled every year ,and NEVER maintenance sanded, (maybe oiling every 3 years is ok just for color restoration)
Teak cabinetry and wood trim exterior and interior on a boat is classy and long lived. It can be epiphaned as a natural varnish that is shiny yet porous. (Teak doesnt react well to poly. Poly will usually peel off like gross potato chip shards in a few years of sunlight)

I dont think we use many wooden warships any more (maybe a minesweeper or two).
Every wood has a fine window of usage. Go over that and its trouble. Like Id NEVER use oak decking because water and oak are unfriendly whenever there are tight bond areas that can induce rot. Oak IS still the best for framing (with exception of surfaces that are curved and must take impact from ice (or other crap) where lignum or Osage is the best).

Wood pilot houses are still made in douglas fir because its relly a pine that lasts and takes paint,

We have some outdoor teak pices that Ive kept outside for several years. Every yer I give em a power wash with a ClO- solution and they come back great. Of corse we use cushions over the season so we dont get any possible splinters.

Outdoors though, I prefer a "Heywood Wakefield" plastic wicker look. That stuff is bullet proof and will last for centuries if you dont hit it with a match (it burns real good).
One of my favorite project furniture woods is "Attic Pine". Its an old yellow pine flooring that can be bought from 'antique wood sellers". Weve learned that, instead of tearing down an old house and burning it, there is a huge market for the old woods. Ive built 3 hanging corner cupbords out of attic pine and did "faux" painting on each and they look like real antiques (no fake scumbling or crackle paint but real additive layers of slightly different colors to emulate age)
It wont fool any expert (a black light lets one know that paint is modern or not-all acrylics will glow a dull blue while only a few old oil bases even react to UV flourescence)



farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 04:56 am
@farmerman,
Forgot ---Indian Lilc (neem) is a very popular wood for furniture that is made for export in Indonesia and SE Asia. Its apparently quite an invasive weed with mahogany properties. I have never really seen any (knowingly).
All the furniture from Indonesia has been (I think) grove mahogany and ALL the furniture is made using the wood (Primary and secondary woods). Apparently its strong as mahogany but easier to carve.
Ive seen ads in wood working spots where neem can be bought by the boardfoot (It seems rather expensive for furniture of a certain design.

Ill have to look up its properties more and see whaere it differs between mahogany.
I understand you can eat neem fruit for dessert.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Mar, 2016 05:00 am
@NicholesAmmons,
do you use much maple for painted furniture or cabinets?

I have a small woodlot with mostly curly maple type wood. I will harvest a tree and have it boarded every few years and use it for projects
NicholesAmmons
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 May, 2016 12:10 am
@farmerman,
Extremely sorry for not replying for so long farmerman.

Maple's used for the kitchen cabinets for its light color and also the durability that it provides. If your inclination if generally toward the antique style then I've seen that the white cabinets will blend in beautifully.
So, yea, you can use maple with other painted furniture/ cbainets.
0 Replies
 
 

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