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Sweet Molecule Could Lead Us To Alien Life

 
 
Reply Thu 27 Nov, 2008 01:21 am
Sweet Molecule Could Lead Us To Alien Life

Scientists have detected an organic sugar molecule that is directly linked to the origin of life, in a region of our galaxy where habitable planets could exist.

The international team of researchers, including a researcher at University College London (UCL), used the IRAM radio telescope in France to detect the molecule in a massive star forming region of space, some 26000 light years from Earth.
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Musky Hunter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Nov, 2008 01:35 pm
@Sabz5150,
Sabz5150;62656 wrote:
Sweet Molecule Could Lead Us To Alien Life

Scientists have detected an organic sugar molecule that is directly linked to the origin of life, in a region of our galaxy where habitable planets could exist.

The international team of researchers, including a researcher at University College London (UCL), used the IRAM radio telescope in France to detect the molecule in a massive star forming region of space, some 26000 light years from Earth.


Now that takes faith. :p
Numpty
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Nov, 2008 06:37 pm
@Musky Hunter,
Musky Hunter;62667 wrote:
Now that takes faith. :p


Why does it?

Did you actually read the article?
Musky Hunter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Nov, 2008 12:03 am
@Numpty,
Numpty;62671 wrote:
Why does it?

Did you actually read the article?


Yes. Very interesting and quite probably true.
0 Replies
 
Sabz5150
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Nov, 2008 10:08 pm
@Musky Hunter,
Musky Hunter;62667 wrote:
Now that takes faith. :p


How so? The article is based upon evidence, nothing more. It states that a molecule we know is key to life has been found in an area suitable for planets to form.

Oh that's right... you need to lower the science bar so your religion can get over it. Nice try.
Musky Hunter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Nov, 2008 09:31 am
@Sabz5150,
Sabz5150;62697 wrote:
How so? The article is based upon evidence, nothing more. It states that a molecule we know is key to life has been found in an area suitable for planets to form.

Oh that's right... you need to lower the science bar so your religion can get over it. Nice try.


I am just really impressed with researchers that can detect "a molecule in a massive star forming region of space, some 26000 light years from Earth."

That is some really great equipment.
Sabz5150
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Nov, 2008 11:04 am
@Musky Hunter,
Musky Hunter;62700 wrote:
I am just really impressed with researchers that can detect "a molecule in a massive star forming region of space, some 26000 light years from Earth."

That is some really great equipment.


It's known as spectrum analysis and atomic spectroscopy. The concept is rather simple, actually. It's how we discovered that the Sun and stars in space were comprised of hydrogen and helium long before we discovered powered human flight and gained the technology required to send probes into space. It's also how we tell the atmospheric content of other planets without actually going there.

From the Wikipedia page on spectral lines:

Spectral lines are the result of interaction between a quantum system (usually atoms, but sometimes molecules or atomic nuclei) and single photons. When a photon has about the right amount of energy to allow a change in the energy state of the system (in the case of an atom this is usually an electron changing orbitals), the photon is absorbed. Then it will be slowly re-emitted, either in the same frequency as the original or in a cascade, where the sum of the energies of the photons emitted will be very different from the energy of the one absorbed. The direction of the new photons will be related to the direction of travel of the original photon.

Depending on the type of gas, the photon source and what reaches the detector of the instrument, either an emission line or an absorption line will be produced. If the gas is between the photon source and the detector, a decrease in the intensity of light in the frequency of the incident photon will be seen, as the reemitted photons will mostly be in directions different from the original one. This will be an absorption line. If the detector sees the gas, but not the original photon source, then the detector will see the photons reemitted in a narrow frequency range. This will be an emission line.

Spectral lines are highly atom-specific, and can be used to identify the chemical composition of any medium capable of letting light pass through it (typically gas is used). Several elements were discovered by spectroscopic means, such as helium, thallium, and cerium. Spectral lines also depend on the physical conditions of the gas, so they are widely used to determine the chemical composition of stars and other celestial bodies that cannot be analyzed by other means, as well as their physical conditions.
[/b]

Spectral line - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Again, class dismissed Smile
0 Replies
 
physicistphilosopher
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Dec, 2008 07:56 pm
@Musky Hunter,
Musky Hunter;62700 wrote:
I am just really impressed with researchers that can detect "a molecule in a massive star forming region of space, some 26000 light years from Earth."

That is some really great equipment.


It is amazing what human minds can do when they aren't being oppressed by carpenters and tent-makers. Don't worry, we'll all burn in hell because we sciencey types "leaned upon own own understanding". You oughtta send us something though, to pay for all the light switches and automobiles the Body of Christ used.
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