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Virginia Tech Debacle/ Work of a Deranged Man............Or

 
 
OCCOM BILL
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Apr, 2007 09:42 am
sozobe wrote:
Btw, re: being able to affford it, evidently several of those last purchases were on a credit card. The implication (from a NYT article) was that he knew he'd never have to pay it...
At the risk of stereotyping; I'd wager Korean born college students who don't have impeccable credit are few and far between. Not repaying debts there is neither accepted socially nor legally.

I remember a Korean friend of mine telling the story of getting busted for possession of Marijuana by a drug sniffing dog that stopped outside his cabin on a cruise ship. The authorities informed him that he'd have to come with them and wait for someone to raise the money for the hefty fine before he'd be allowed to leave Barbados(?). He was terrified because his mother happened to be on the same ship, one floor above, and this isn't something he wanted to tell her about. "So how much is the fine?" (I forget the actual amount; but for the purpose of relaying the story $2,500 will work). He breathed a sigh of relief and promptly pulled the dough out of his wallet. The authorities were both surprised and suspicious and demanded to know why he traveled with so much money. Not having a better answer, he replied with a shrug and said simply "I'm Asian". The authorities looked at each other, shrugged themselves and proceeded to fill out the requisite paperwork on the spot.
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yitwail
 
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Reply Mon 23 Apr, 2007 09:45 am
stuh505 wrote:
The only reason that the insanity law exists is to avoid executing up retarded people that accidentally do something that they don't know is wrong.


i'm curious about whether there's some kind of minimal mental capacity that's required for anyone who purchases a gun. i doubt it. the only restrictions i can think of are age & criminal history, and i think the same is true of a lot of other privileges like driving and voting, but if i'm wrong, i'd like to know what the restrictions are and how mental capacity is evaluated in such instances.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Apr, 2007 09:54 am
Quote:
'm curious about whether there's some kind of minimal mental capacity that's required for anyone who purchases a gun


In the U.S., IQ tests are not required to own a gun, to vote, or to
get a driver's permit.
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yitwail
 
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Reply Mon 23 Apr, 2007 12:35 pm
getting a driver's license requires passing the written test, at least. and in the pre-Civil Rights south, African-Americans had to pass various written tests to vote, as i recall, but i'm unsure if such tests were unconstitutional in themselves, or only because only African-Americans were required to take them. anyway, one wonders why it should be easier to own a gun than it is to drive a car.
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stuh505
 
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Reply Mon 23 Apr, 2007 01:18 pm
Good point, yitwail. You don't need to take a test of any kind to get a non-automatic gun. However you don't need to take a mental evaluation to get a car either. You just need to demonstrate that you know how to operate it. Operating a gun is really simple you don't really need to take a test for it. If there was a mental evaluation that you needed for a gun, that would probably violate the right to bear arms and would cause a big stink. Not to mention, it wouldn't do any good, because the only people who are really dangerous with guns are the deranged-but-not-insane people.
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Sun 21 Dec, 2008 09:53 am
Quote:
One day after Virginia Tech released thousands of documents solely to families of victims in last year's massacre, the university's student newspaper made them public.

On Thursday, the Collegiate Times posted the documents, which include e-mails sent from the account of gunman Seung-Hui Cho, who killed 32 fellow students and faculty members and then killed himself on April 16, 2007.

The nearly 14,000 pages also include the police report on the massacre, e-mails from faculty sent to fellow professors and to Cho, a 2005 harassment complaint against Cho, post-massacre clean-up plans, administration plans on how to present the tragedy to the public, and post-massacre fundraising advice.

According to The Washington Post, the newspaper's editor in chief, David Grant, said that no one hacked into the university's computers to access the documents. He would not say how they were obtained.

Families of the victims were given access to the records as part of a legal settlement to avoid lawsuits, according to the Associated Press. The university was expected to make the documents public in February
Source


http://i44.tinypic.com/30ij01x.jpg
Links to documents at Collegiate Tmes
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