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Big Dog, Little Dog

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2007 07:37 am

Researchers Identify Gene Involved in Dog Size
Discovery May Help Efforts to Better Understand Genetic Influences on Stature in Humans, Other Mammals
BETHESDA, Md., Thur., Apr. 5, 2007

An international team led by researchers from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has identified a genetic variant that is a major contributor to small size in dogs. The findings appear in the April 6, 2007 issue of the journal Science.

"The identification and characterization of a key genetic variant that accounts for differences in dog size is particularly exciting because the underlying gene is present in all dogs and other diverse species, including humans," said Eric Green, M.D., Ph.D., scientific director of the NHGRI Division of Intramural Research. "Discoveries like this illustrate the exciting promise of genomics research for understanding the inheritance of a wide range of traits, including those that have an impact on health and disease."

The branch of the canine family tree that includes domestic dogs diverged from that of the gray wolf more than 15,000 years ago. Due to selective breeding by humans throughout history, dogs today exhibit an extremely wide range of body types and behaviors. In fact, dogs exhibit the greatest diversity in body size of any mammalian species.

In their study, researchers explored the genetic basis for size variation among dogs by comparing the DNA of various small dog breeds, including Chihuahuas, Toy Fox Terriers and Pomeranians, to an array of larger dog breeds, including Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Great Danes. Their investigation found that variation in one gene - IGF-1, which codes for a protein hormone called insulin-like growth factor 1 - is very strongly associated with small stature across all dog breeds studied.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,356 • Replies: 19
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BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2007 08:47 am
BBB
bm
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2007 10:29 am

Re: BBB
i had no idea dogs were the only mammals with such a vast size range.

http://cache.boston.com/resize/bonzai-fba/Globe_Photo/2007/04/05/1175827833_6555/410w.jpg
Gibson, a Great Dane that, according to the Guinness Book of World Records,
is the world's tallest dog at more than 7 feet on his hind legs, with friend Zoie,
a 7.5-inch-tall Chihuahua


BumbleBeeBoogie wrote:
bm

er, anybody got a pooper-scooper?
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2007 03:59 pm
Saw a teacup Yorkie today -- little teeny tiny thing, would've been slightly too big for the palm of my hand, but not by too much. And then I think of Onyx, who was a Newfie I knew over 20 years ago who thought he was a lap dog. All 200 or so drooling pounds of him.

I do hope this opens up treatments for anything height-related, like Marfan's Syndrome seems to be.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2007 04:02 pm
Re: BBB
Region Philbis wrote:
i had no idea dogs were the only mammals with such a vast size range.



Neither did I, Reg. Tres interesting.
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Apr, 2007 05:24 pm
From How Corn Came to Earth

Quote:
Mother-Corn called on the Dog to save the people by appeasing the Whirlwind. "Only by giving up my freedom," the Dog replied, "can I do this. No longer can I hunt alone like my brother the Wolf, or roam free like the Coyote. I shall always be dependent upon the people."


Canus Lupus throw viable pups to many Canus Species, and they eat well too. "Sometimes, though---even a good dog loses to a 'coon.'"--Uncle Johnny

Rap
0 Replies
 
Quincy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2007 04:30 pm
Re: BBB
Region Philbis wrote:
http://cache.boston.com/resize/bonzai-fba/Globe_Photo/2007/04/05/1175827833_6555/410w.jpg

They're friends?
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Apr, 2007 06:04 pm

strictly platonic, i'm sure...
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2007 01:00 am
Re: BBB
Quincy wrote:
Region Philbis wrote:
http://cache.boston.com/resize/bonzai-fba/Globe_Photo/2007/04/05/1175827833_6555/410w.jpg

They're friends?


So this was the pair on the Ark, right?
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 11 Apr, 2007 10:29 am

Re: BBB
Eorl wrote:
So this was the pair on the Ark, right?

it's hard to believe they share a common ancestor...
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2007 11:16 am
Dogs were probably the first animal to be domesticated--probably in part by selective breeding. When you work on a project for 15,000 years you can accomplish wonders.
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Apr, 2007 06:39 pm
OK, hit me with sticks but....it could be argued that dogs (and sheep, cattle, cats, etc.) are products of intelligent design.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Apr, 2007 07:55 am
Eorl--

Anything can be argued. Not everything can be validated.
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Apr, 2007 07:04 pm
Maybe pit-bulls could be called products of not-very-intelligent design?
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  2  
Reply Wed 18 Apr, 2007 01:14 pm
Or pit bulls could represent Nature in the Inner City.
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2007 10:21 pm
There're plenty of pit bulls out here in the sticks, lady.

Intelligent design is the herding dog mutt (and none of the so-called "pure-breds," who didn't exist 200 years ago).

Unintelligent design is the Labrador (brains, knees), the Irish Wolfhound (dying young), the English Bulldog (if you can't breed, your out, I think should be the rule -- but I do like a good turkey sandwich), the poodle (I mean, c'mon), the Cocker Spaniel (does anything WORK on this thing? It's the 1960s Jaguar of dogs), ...
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Fri 20 Apr, 2007 07:06 am
Eorl wrote:
OK, hit me with sticks but....it could be argued that dogs (and sheep, cattle, cats, etc.) are products of intelligent design.


Products of Artificial Selection seems more accurate to me.

If we had modified the genes directly to create an intended change, then I would lean toward calling it design.
0 Replies
 
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Apr, 2007 04:08 am
its amazing what is possible, without even knowing about dna humans have "created" (ok more like altered) their own species. Now, imagine what is possible with the inclusion of genetic knowledge of todays world and what could be accomplished if people bred themselves the same way they breed dogs.

is that scary, or simply an interesting thought?

could this possibly lead to more human species? could we have specialised human "breeds" more extreme than the different races we have now?
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 Apr, 2007 04:48 pm
Yes, maybe we could achieve something like this...



http://www.doggienews.com/uploaded_images/sam-calendar-792074.jpg
0 Replies
 
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 May, 2007 02:06 am
I <3 THAT UGLY LIL GUY! now thats gangsta.
0 Replies
 
 

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