0
   

Hogarth’s London

 
 
Reply Sat 17 Feb, 2007 02:58 am
Copied/pasted from today's Daily Telegraph (travel section, pages T12 & T13).

A really good report, related to the exhibition momentarily on show at the Tate:


Quote:
WHERE TO GO

Immerse yourself in Hogarth's London

It is almost 250 years since the artist died but his vision of the city still resonates today. Fired by viewing his etchings and paintings in a splendid retrospective at Tate Britain, Nick Trend visits the places in London that had special significance to him and his contemporaries
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,571 • Replies: 25
No top replies

 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 17 Feb, 2007 02:58 am
http://i15.tinypic.com/4dppi75.jpg


Quote:
St Bartholomew the Great, EC1St Bart's Hospital Museum, EC1

Hogarth did not paint only satirical narratives. He also had a taste for grand history paintings and religious tableaux. Two of his most ambitious works are the murals that decorate the walls of the grand staircase of the old entrance hall to one of the buildings of St Bart's Hospital. One depicts the Good Samaritan, the other Christ healing the lame man at the pool of Bethesda, in which the figures by the pool were supposedly modelled on patients at the hospital. The murals were undertaken by Hogarth free of charge after he heard that the hospital governors wanted to commission a Venetian artist to do the work. During museum opening hours, you can walk though the main display room to see the murals from the hallway. To get a decent close up view, you can see them as part of a guided tour every Friday at 1pm. Open: Tues-Fri, 10am-4pm. Free admission. Contact: 020 7601 8152, www. bartsandthelondon.org.uk - click on About Us.


Museum of London, EC2

The 18th-century galleries are a good starting point to get a feel for the detail of Hogarth's London. The many exhibits range from wooden panels from Wellclose Square Prison, carved with graffiti by inmates in the 1750s, to a contemporary doll's house and the Lord Mayor's coach of 1757. You have a couple more weeks to enjoy the galleries before they close for restoration on March 6. Open daily, 10am (Sun 12pm)-5.50pm. Free admission. Contact: 0870 444 3851, www.museumoflondon.org.uk.


Covent Garden and Leicester Square, WC2

Hogarth spent part of the 1720s living as an apprentice in his future father-in-law's house in a corner of Covent Garden. The house, now demolished, was on the site of the Royal Opera House and Floral Hall, but parts of the Piazza still survive from Hogarth's time (see left). Leicester Square (called Leicester Fields at the time), was then a desirable address, and by the 1730s Hogarth was prosperous enough to move into a fourstorey house in the south-eastern corner of the square. It was where he produced most of his best-known works and although nothing of the building survives (it was pulled down in 1870) there is a small memorial bust and plaque dedicated to Hogarth in the north-east corner.


The Foundling Museum, WC1Dr Johnson's House, EC4

Although they certainly met, we don't know if Hogarth ever came to Dr Johnson's house in Gough Square. But it is worth a visit because it is both the best example of a London house of the period and during Johnson' s tenure it was the intellectual hub of the city. Full of Johnson memorabilia. Open: Mon to Sat, 11am to 5pm, £4.50. Contact: 020 7353 3745, www. drjohnsonshouse.org.


Hogarth's House, Chiswick
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 06:44 am
thanks for posting this Walter. Will do the Hogarth walk with you some day.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 08:51 am
There are a few instances in Tom Jones where Mr Fielding refers the reader to a Hogarth picture to overcome the limitations of verbal description to give the best description of a character. It is a useful technique for anyone who has access to the pictures referred to. He confines the trick to minor characters as far as I remember.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 12:34 pm
spendius wrote:
There are a few instances in Tom Jones where Mr Fielding refers the reader to a Hogarth picture to overcome the limitations of verbal description to give the best description of a character. It is a useful technique for anyone who has access to the pictures referred to. He confines the trick to minor characters as far as I remember.
Tom Jones is Welsh. He knows about the green green grass of home but not Hogarth.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 01:27 pm
The Tom Jones you are referring to Steve is actually a human being despite his trying to look like an automatic phallic jerk.

The Tom Jones I referred to is an object weighing about 3llbs ( if you remember them) with 736 beautifully printed pages and a few illustrations, in Hogarthian style by Thomas Rowlandson, enclosed in dark red leather boards with gold embellishments. Its function is to reflect down the ages a rough outline of Henry Fielding's mind during the time he composed it. And a rather pleasant mind it is I must say. I wish Mr Fielding would come to the pub but alas I know that is not possible so I have to make do with the mirror cloudy though it is.

When I said " in Tom Jones" I was obviously thinking of the object weighing 3 llbs.

I just wanted to make that clear in case any misunderstandings might arise.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 01:53 pm
I suppose, there's more than only the 50 years time difference between Rowlandson ...

http://i5.tinypic.com/358o0tv.jpg

... and Hogart :wink:

http://i5.tinypic.com/4dg7nlw.jpg
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 01:58 pm
They look grand scenes but they weren't really. It was pretty awful living in those days even as a toff.

To our delicately refined sensibilities it would be unbearable.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 03:06 pm
Actually Walt, it is all a carefully orchestrated hype to induce people to visit our capital city and spend their wages on the many and various services provided for those who find themselves hypnotised into being there as a tourist.

One mustn't get carried away.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 03:13 pm
You're certainly correct - but it's really a pleasure to do such ..... without paying a lot of money, but investing just a few pounds for a book and follow some "secret walks" :wink:
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Feb, 2007 04:20 pm
Are secret walks a bit thin on the ground where you are?

If they are I fully understand. Riga's the "in" place I'm told.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 06:44 am
Tom Jones is a book? An autobiography?
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 06:48 am
Actually walter Hogarth's famous illustrations "Gin Lane" and "Beer Alley" were an attempt to curb the pernicious affects of gin drinking. The Beer Alley picture you posted illustrated relative contentment and prosperity

http://www.adnax.com/views/viewsoflondoncharacters02.htm
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 12:09 pm
Hogarth Alert. Artsword 7.00 tonight. (267).
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 12:13 pm
spendius wrote:
Hogarth Alert. Artsword 7.00 tonight. (267).
thanks. I have BBC1 or BBC2. Channel 267 is beyond my tv.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 03:48 pm
So was it any good Spends? The 267 Hogarth channel? Was cycling between Sainsburys, the Hare and the Cock...nearly got killed but thats another story

In the Hare bunch of medics were swotting up for their exam...embarrassingly easy questions...how many eyes, leg bones. Synovial fluid whassat? you know...

Then the East Europeans arrived and pulled out their Chess Equipment.

Such rareified circles I cycle in.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 04:01 pm
Steve 41oo wrote:
So was it any good Spends? The 267 Hogarth channel?


On Sky digital channel 267 it was.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Feb, 2007 06:21 pm
Pure crap.

Nothing whatsover to do with art.

Pictorial journalism. Another agenda. F**k preachers.

Mugs wanted.

The jingle-jangle bells of the tills are ringing.

Flattering the egos don't you know?

"Hey Mr Tambourine man
Play a song for me
I'm not sleepy
And there is
No place
I'm going to.

Hey Mr Tambourine man
Play a song for me
In the jingle-jangle morning
I'll come following yeeeeeeeeeuuuuuww!!!!!!

Philip Larkin did not say it was the world's best song for nothing.

Surpassing Barbara Allen he must have meant.

See the vids of the 1981 versions. Stoned.

I just love Mr Tambourine Man.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Feb, 2007 07:22 am
I liked Bob Dylan too. I say liked because I cant listen to him anymore. I had a whole pile of his records once...I distinctly remember them. They were quite large and made out of black plastic, with a hole in the middle. Now I dont know where they went (or going to). Then I had a dvd and a cd player and a computer with sound card....all fallen by the wayside. I'm now reduced to listening to the wireless, but they dont play much Dylan on radio 3. However Wagner with bongos was good this morning.. (I'm not making this up). Can you post some Dylan sheet music Spends, I'll attempt to recreate it in my head a la Beethoven.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Feb, 2007 10:58 am
Posting on A2K is all I can do Steve.

There's some stuff on Google but how to get it here I've no idea. It wouldn't copy.

Anyway Dylan doesn't stick to any sheet music really. I doubt he can read music off a sheet.

Bryan Ferry has just put out a complete album of Dylan covers.

You can see some videos on You Tube and Google video.

They say Wagner is a bit suspect.

Are you deaf?
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

THE BRITISH THREAD II - Discussion by jespah
FOLLOWING THE EUROPEAN UNION - Discussion by Mapleleaf
The United Kingdom's bye bye to Europe - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
Sinti and Roma: History repeating - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
[B]THE RED ROSE COUNTY[/B] - Discussion by Mathos
Leaving today for Europe - Discussion by cicerone imposter
So you think you know Europe? - Discussion by nimh
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Hogarth’s London
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 11/29/2021 at 03:00:56