Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 12:27 pm
Nice article by Tara Duggan in the SF Chronicle today on different mustards.

Mustard Link

All the recipes look wonderful to me, so I'll copy them here. Check the article though for a lot more about mustard types and how they differ.

Do you have any recipes you like that you use mustard in?


clip -

Salmon Crostini with Mustard-Dill Sauce
Makes 30 crostini


Instead of French bread, you can use 15 pieces of cocktail rye bread, cut in half diagonally. You might have extra sauce, which you can use on sandwiches or as a base for salad dressing.

INGREDIENTS:

1 small French baguette (4 ounces), sliced 1/8-inch thick into 30 slices
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt + more to taste
3 tablespoons sugar
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/2 cup Dijon mustard
1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh dill, plus sprigs to garnish
1 1/2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
8 ounces smoked salmon

INSTRUCTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 375°.

Place the bread slices in a large bowl and drizzle with a thin stream of the olive oil while tossing with tongs. Season with 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt. Place in one layer on a baking sheet and toast in the preheated oven until they start to become golden, 8 minutes. Flip and finish until crisp and lightly browned, 1-2 more minutes. Let cool.

Meanwhile, combine 6 tablespoons water and the sugar in a small saucepan. Heat until dissolved, then add the vinegar and mustard. Bring to a simmer and cook until thickened, 10-15 minutes, stirring or whisking often. Remove from the heat and stir in the dill and lemon juice. Adjust to taste with salt and allow to cool. The sauce will thicken more as it cools.

Cut the salmon into 30 equal pieces -- an easy way to do this is to cut through the overlapping slices vertically with a few long cuts. Separate the dill into tiny sprigs for garnish about the size of your fingernail.

Brush the crostini with the mustard sauce, then top each with a piece of the salmon, loosely rolled into an oblong shape that fits over the bread. Top each with a 1/4 teaspoon dollop of the sauce and then a sprig of dill.

Per crostini: 40 calories, 2 g protein, 5 g carbohydrate, 2 g fat (0 saturated), 2 mg cholesterol, 310 mg sodium, 0 fiber.


Crispy Mustard Lamb Chops
Serves 4, or 6-8 as an appetizer

This makes a good appetizer; guests can pick the chops up by the bone. For a main course, add mashed potatoes or rice pilaf and serve with the Dandelion Greens with Bacon-Mustard Dressing, if you like.

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup panko breadcrumbs (see Note)
2 tablespoons herbes de Provence
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt + more to taste
1/4 cup honey mustard (or 3 tablespoons Dijon mustard and 1 tablespoon honey)
1 egg white
1 1/2 pounds frenched small lamb rib chops (see Note)
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
1 tablespoon vegetable oil, or more as needed
1 tablespoon butter, or more as needed

INSTRUCTIONS:

Combine the breadcrumbs, herbes de Provence and 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt in a shallow bowl.

In another shallow bowl, whisk together the honey mustard and the egg white.

Trim some of the excess fat from the lamb chops. Season well with salt and pepper. Brush chops on all sides with a thick layer of the mustard mixture, keeping the bones clean. Dip each chop in the breadcrumb mixture, covering with the crumbs and pressing down firmly so that the crumbs stick.

Over medium heat, heat the oil in a nonstick saute pan large enough to fit the lamb chops in one layer, or use a little bit more oil in two pans. Add the butter and allow it to become frothy. Add the lamb chops and cook until browned, watching carefully so they don't burn, 3-4 minutes. Carefully flip them over then cook on the other side an additional 3-4 minutes, or until medium-rare to medium.

Remove the lamb chops from the pan and serve immediately.

Note: Frenched rib chops have been trimmed to expose part of the bone. Some rib chops come with two ribs; if so slice the chops in half between the bones. Panko are Japanese-style breadcrumbs, and are available in the Asian foods section of most grocery stores.

Per serving: 480 calories, 28 g protein, 16 g carbohydrate, 33 g fat (14 g saturated), 111 mg cholesterol, 468 mg sodium, 2 g fiber.


Sausages with Radicchio-Fennel Slaw
Serves 8

Mendocino Mustard's Seeds & Suds mustard is a good choice for this recipe. The slaw also would be good with pan-fried pork chops. Serve with mashed or boiled potatoes.

INGREDIENTS:

3 tablespoons sweet-hot mustard
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt + more to taste
Pepper, to taste
1-2 teaspoons sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 small head radicchio, cored and thinly sliced (about 4 cups)
2 large fennel bulbs, cored and thinly sliced
2 carrots, coarsely grated
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds (optional)
8 bratwurst or other mild sausage

INSTRUCTIONS:

Combine the mustard, vinegar, salt, pepper and sugar, then whisk in the vegetable oil. Add to the radicchio, fennel, carrots and fennel seeds, if using, and toss until well coated. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and chill 30 minutes to overnight.

When ready to serve, grill or steam the sausages, then serve with the slaw.

Per serving: 375 calories, 14 g protein, 10 g carbohydrate, 32 g fat (9 g saturated), 51 mg cholesterol, 791 mg sodium, 3 g fiber.


Dandelion Greens with Bacon-Mustard Dressing
Serves 6

You can substitute frisee (the tender light green leaves only) or endive for the dandelion greens. If your store sells pancetta in the deli case, ask for it sliced 1/4-inch thick.

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups 1/4-inch cubes crustless country French or Italian bread
2 teaspoons olive oil + 2 tablespoons
Salt to taste
2 slices thick-cut bacon or 3-4 slices pancetta, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
1 tablespoon stone-ground or Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon apple cider or sherry vinegar + 1 teaspoon
1 bunch dandelion greens
Pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 350°.

In a medium bowl, toss the bread cubes with 2 teaspoons olive oil and salt to taste. Place on a medium baking sheet and toast in the oven until browned, 10-12 minutes.

Meanwhile, saute the bacon over medium heat until browned and very crisp, about 10 minutes.

In a salad bowl, whisk together the mustard, 1 tablespoon vinegar and remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil.

Remove the stems from the dandelion greens, wash and dry well, then cut or rip into 2-inch pieces. Place on top of the dressing in the bowl with the croutons.

When the bacon is crisp, drain out all but about 1 tablespoon of the bacon fat (see Note), from the pan, then remove from the heat and stir in remaining 1 teaspoon vinegar to the pan. Pour over the salad while still warm and season to taste with salt and lots of pepper. Toss well.

Note: Pancetta will render a lot less fat than bacon so you may not need to drain it.

Per serving: 165 calories, 5 g protein, 15 g carbohydrate, 10 g fat (2 g saturated), 5 mg cholesterol, 267 mg sodium, 3 g fiber.


Heirloom Tomato Tart
Serves 8-10

The heirloom tomato season is coming to a close. If you can't find them, substitute beefsteak or other flavorful hybrids, though they won't be as pretty and you may need a few extra.

INGREDIENTS:

1 piece puff pastry, thawed
1 egg white
4 medium-size heirloom tomatoes in different colors
3 tablespoons whole-grain mustard
Sea salt
1 shallot, thinly sliced and slices separated into rings
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme

INSTRUCTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 375°. Lightly grease or line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone liner.

On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to about 12- by 15-inch rectangle. Place on the prepared pan and flip over a 1/2-inch border, using water to hold down the edges and then crimping with a fork.

Whisk the egg white with 1 tablespoon water, and brush this over the edge of the tart. Prick the inside of the tart in several places with the fork. Par-bake until lightly browned and slightly cooked in the center, 12-15 minutes. Let cool slightly.

Meanwhile, cut the tomatoes in half through the equator, then gently squeeze to remove seeds and excess liquid. Slice into 1/8- to 1/4-inch-thick slices.

Spread the prepared crust evenly with the mustard, then layer the tomatoes on top in alternate colors, overlapping them by about 1/2 inch and arranging them tightly within the edges (they will shrink a bit). Season well with sea salt, then top with the shallot rings and thyme.

Cook until the tomatoes are softened and the crust is cooked through in the center, 20-25 minutes.

Per serving: 155 calories, 3 g protein, 15 g carbohydrate, 10 g fat (1 g saturated), 0 cholesterol, 143 mg sodium, 1 g fiber.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 2,660 • Replies: 20
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 03:38 pm
By a remarkable coincidence, I was just thinking about mustard. I once tried to trade Urs out of some tubes of Meistersenf mustard, in exchange for Snickers bars, or some such. Walter tells me it isn't on the market, but it would be a mittlesharfe senf. Crying or Very sad
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 04:46 pm
My fave has long been Maille Dijon, but it seems to vary widely in flavor and heat (I know there are different varieties), and recently faired very poorly in a blind taste test that included fans of Maille.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 05:14 pm
There are mustards in that article I've not heard of....


mittlesharfe senf - whazzat?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:07 pm
Medium sharp, senf being mustard. In Germany, it was often sold in tubes, kind of like toothpaste, only much, much better. The Meistersenf would translate, more or less, as Master Mustard. I think it made more sense in Deutch.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:34 pm
I like hot mustard but that yellow crap they serve on hotdogs is vile.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 07:50 pm
Dusseldorfer mmmmmmm nice and sharp.

Some of the mustards in Chinese restos are also wonderfully sharp.

I like mustard rubs on so many things.

I lovedlovedloved the hot mustard sauce that Mickey D's used to carry - I used to go and order small fries and ask for 4 or 5 hot mustard sauces - to take home and put on cheese sangwiches.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 08:11 pm
Medium sharp, got it.

I've had the chinese mustard/horseradish mix, many times. Clears out those dead brain cells nicely.

I recently bought at my oh-thank-god-I-found-it (Diane knew where it was) international market.. a jar of french mustard, brand name Clovis. Probably no special thing, but fine by me.

I just happen to be cooking... since I went to the store, and the fish that looked, er, purchasable, was a fresh atlantic salmon farmed - I went into my faux remoulade mode. That is, I bought two onions, just to make sure I had two onions.

I've described it before, an attempt of mine to match the topping on some salmon at restaurant back in my old port town...
never did match it, but I'm now addicted to -

2 spanish onions chopped,
probably 4 tbs pure olive oil.
Saute onions, perhaps as much as thirty minutes, on rather low.
Add -
a bit of salt (3/4 tsp?)
a bit of pepper (15 turns of the pepper mill?)

In a while, as the onions get more translucent, a tablespoon of some mustard - tonight I added Inglehoffer Stone Ground Mustard Full Strength, I suppose an ordinary brand but fine by me.

Finished off by - because I had my lemon peeler thingy at hand, having just found it - some lemon peel, and then squeezed the juice of half a lemon into the onions.

OK, now I have this pile of tasty onions. I'll do the salmon tomorrow.
The onions work on toast too.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 10:55 pm
bm

I'd be interested to know a lot more, osso.

I have just 2 jars of mustard in my fridge: a Dijon mustard & a grainy wholegrain one. Both French. I don't know nearly enough about using either very creatively, really.

Please continue! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 10:59 pm
Ya squirt it on hot dogs. How much creativity does that take?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 Oct, 2006 11:05 pm
roger wrote:
Ya squirt it on hot dogs. How much creativity does that take?


To get it absolutely perfect, quite a bit, I imagine! :wink:
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Oct, 2006 04:55 pm
go to this site

http://www.mustardmaker.com/

click on products - then mustards - then on the particular mustard for a recipe

some great ideas in there
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 01:50 am
Thanks, ehBeth.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 09:57 am
I put some of those leftover mustard-pepper-lemon-onions in with five whisked eggs, something like eight tablespoons of water, plus, oh, two tablespoons of olive oil, some sweet red pepper, some chile flakes, some torn up basil leaves, a little left over risotto, one bit of already cooked hot italian sausage which I'd cut up into smallish bits, and some leftover red potato... and baked that in a buttered glass pie plate for 45 minutes. Wonderful...
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 10:00 am
ehBeth, that's a GREAT link!
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 11:03 am
I bought 4 bottles of mustard from that producer during the foodie get-together this weekend.

Thank goodness for enablers.

Very Happy
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 11:33 am
Rayes Mustards of Maine , makes a number of styles from apickelily all the way to jalepeno. I love their ginger mustard.

Osso, I would make a little addition to the hot bacon dressing, always beat an egg into the mix and develop a mayonnaise. Add some sugar to taste (It doesnt take a lot )otherwise the taste will not be as sweet and sour as we normally like. Weserve this over a mildly wilted dandelion green. Its a spring tonic that cant be beat. In the winter , we serve it over unwilted cold spinach,(the hot dressing will wilt the spinach )

Also the lamb. Not a big fan of rice flour crumbs, rough up a stale baguette or Italian bread and add the rest of the ingredients plus a T of fresh ground rosemary. We bake our lambchops at 500 degrees less than 5 minutes in a well preheated oven.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 11:57 am
I agree with your comments, farmerman. And I'd never think of buying bread (or rice) crumbs, not to knock anyone who does. I'm just used to having really good bread around..

You do your turkey on high heat too, dontcha..
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 12:05 pm
I blackened a turkey that way once, but not on purpose.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Oct, 2006 12:11 pm
Osso, our turkey is always at 500 degrees and is the crispiest skinned and moistest bird around. 7 min per pound and we lay it on its side for 1/2 the time, then roll er over so both sides get done nicely. Then we lay er on her side for 10 more min and pull it out of the oven and let sit for a half hour Lately Weve been getting these "old fashioned " breed turkeys . They taste a gazillion times more turkier.

Beth, thanks for the mustard site
0 Replies
 
 

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