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Any Atheist/Agnostic persecution stories

 
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 01:27 pm
Mostly, they don't go after individuals, unless the individuals make too much noise. What they do instead, is go after atheists as a group. So, not too many stories of oppression. They prefer to change the pledge of allegiance, put religion in the schools and otherwise keep atheists in tow.
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neologist
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 04:00 pm
Noddy24 wrote:
In the '40's my elementary school teachers had an unseemly and didactic interest Monday Morning interest as to whether we had attended Sunday School and/or Church the day before.

Non-attendance brought disapproval.

I tried Sunday School (Methodist) and wasn't impressed. I tried fibbing about having attended Sunday School and suffered pangs of conscience. Eventually I decided that being a non believer was much more comfortable than being either a believer or a hypocrite.
Uh Oh. I lied without conscience. Laughing
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 04:33 pm
Neologist--

My pagan parents were big on ethics--far more so than the Sunday school teachers or even the public school teachers.
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Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Sep, 2006 07:11 pm
My wife wanted to marry me in a church, as she had (and still has) some faith. No church we spoke to would do it (understable), and one preist suggested my wife look around a bit further....for a more suitable husband.

I also testified at a murder trial once, and was handed a bible and asked to swear an oath. I didn't want to make a scene about my principles in a freakin' murder trial, and I didn't want to do anything that would weaken the prosecutions case...so I just did as I was told. I regret that a lot. I'm not quite sure it was perjury....but I felt like it was.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Sep, 2006 06:45 am
Eorl wrote:
My wife wanted to marry me in a church, as she had (and still has) some faith. No church we spoke to would do it (understable), and one preist suggested my wife look around a bit further....for a more suitable husband.

I also testified at a murder trial once, and was handed a bible and asked to swear an oath. I didn't want to make a scene about my principles in a freakin' murder trial, and I didn't want to do anything that would weaken the prosecutions case...so I just did as I was told. I regret that a lot. I'm not quite sure it was perjury....but I felt like it was.


At the time of the promulgation of the United States constitution, there were quite a few Protestant sects which objected to taking oaths, many and perhaps most of which objected to taking an oath or making an affirmation on the bible. Therefore, the text of the Constitution states that the President: Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation: "I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will . . .".

The language appears elsewhere in the document. If one were to refuse to swear, or to swear upon the bible, it likely wouldn't raise eyebrows in a U.S. court, except, perhaps, in very peculiar circumstances. I have testified more than once in criminal actions (although never in a murder trial), and have refused to swear upon a bible. It has simply meant that i was asked to affirm that i would tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. This seems not to have prejudiced the cases, as in those examples, i was testitfying for the prosecution, which either won the case, or settled on their own terms. On one occasion, before a grand jury, i refused to so swear, and a couple of the 25 individuals assembled murmured, and the prosecution did not get a true bill (i.e., no charges were brought by the grand jury). However, in that case, i was asked if a set of statements by a police officer were true, and i denied them, because, frankly, the police officer had lied, and had attempted to put words into my mouth. The Prosecutor was enraged--i pointed out to him that he hadn't done his homework, because no one had contacted me to know what my testimony would be to compare it to the statement of the police officer. At all events, i believe in that case that my refusal to swear upon a bible was not a cause to invalidate my testimony.

I don't know what people's attitudes in Australia would be, but in the United States, i don't think such a refusal would excite any unfavorable comment or reaction.
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Diest TKO
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Oct, 2006 07:53 pm
EORL - That would suck, being sworn in. I'd object too. I don't think you did the wrong thing. I think anything that would have taken the focus off of the trial would have contaminiated the judicial system and made for and unfair trial or undermine your testimony. Tough spot to be in.

I used have a girlfirend and she was Catholic. She stole something once from a grocery store. When her family caught her, I took the blame. When I took the blame, her family attacked the "way I was raised." then went on to explain that a wholesome Christian boy wouldn't expose her daughter to such things.

Once I went to the Baptist Student Union at my school on an invite by a friend to a coffee shop event, when I got there I was constantly attacked for my beliefs. I just came to support my friend who was sharing a movie he had made. I felt really uncomfortable.

Two stories of many.
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Diest TKO
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2008 01:19 am
BUMP for another old thread that could be interesting.

T
K
O
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