au1929
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2004 08:26 am
Under different circumstances a revolution would be in the offing. However, In Iran where religion reins supreme it would seem to be too much to hope for. Or would it? The question can religion and democracy co-exist as equal partners?
0 Replies
 
Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2004 01:12 pm
Iranians 'sign up' for suicide missions against coalition forces.

Excerpt--

Iranians sign up for Iraq attacks
By Jim Muir
BBC correspondent in Tehran



Heavy policing has protected the UK embassy from protesters
Hundreds of protesters in the Iranian capital, Tehran, have been signing up to carry out suicide attacks against coalition forces in Iraq.
The symbolic signing took place on what has been billed as a day of mourning over the apparent desecration of holy Shia sites by foreign soldiers in Iraq.

A demonstration has also been held outside the British embassy in Tehran - the sixth in less than two weeks.

The embassy is bearing the brunt of Iranian anger at coalition actions.


In Palestine Square, close to where Friday prayers are held at Tehran University, hundreds of Iranians jostled to fill in forms applying as volunteers for what are being called martyrdom operations against coalition forces in Iraq.

Mohammed Khalili, a teacher who was amongst those signing up, said: "My duty today is just teaching, but if it is the duty to be killed in the way of Islam, I am ready."

Most of those signing up were men of all ages, though there were also a number of women and some young teenage boys.

'Not realistic'

For the time being though, it is just a matter of registration.

The mobilisation may have the sympathy of the authorities here, but it is not being officially encouraged.

The border is closed and, at the moment at least, there is no prospect of a flood of suicide volunteers pouring from here into Iraq.

Rajay Fahr, one of the main organisers, said martyrdom operations were not seen as realistically possible yet.

"Right now it is not practical, but maybe in the future," she said. "Everything depends on the future - what happens in Iraq and what will be the situation."

Controlled protests

At the nearby British embassy, meanwhile, there was yet another angry protest demonstration at American and British actions in Iraq - especially the hostilities around the Shia holy shrines at Najaf and Karbala.

A core of about 100 protesters pelted the main embassy building with stones, breaking more windows, and a number of percussion devices were also thrown.
0 Replies
 
JamesMorrison
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 May, 2004 02:21 pm
Sophia,

Seems this action of signing up candidates for martyrdom is kind of a protest, the Middle Eastern equivalent of a "Sit-In". Would be interesting to find out who gets to keep the list and the recipients of its future distribution. The signatories are obviously in dire need of good jobs and or hobbies.

The Shia trouble makers in the south of Iraq, Muqtada al-Sadr and his militia, have been linked to the Iranian theocracy. The "Young fiery Iraqi cleric" as he is known by more romantic nomenclature has participated in numerous field trips to Iran to "consult" with clerics there. The good news is that The more respected Iraqi Shia clerics such as Grand Ayatollah Sistani dislike al Sadr intensely, not only because of his revolutionary actions, but because he and some of his henchmen are suspected in the 10 April 2003 murder of Shi'ite Grand Ayatollah Abd al-Majid al-Khoi at a mosque in Najaf. Hopeful also is Grand Ayatollah Sistani's expressed desire for a greater separation of church and state then that demonstrated by al Sadr's mechanizations.

The piece that you linked to shows that either the Iranian theocracy lacks the will to prevent such troubling actions by stopping such protests or, more likely, that they approve of such actions that might prevent the rise of a democratic Iraq as a next door neighbor.

JM
0 Replies
 
Sofia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 May, 2004 07:25 pm
Thanks for your take on it, JM. So nice to see you.
Spread yourself around a bit, will you?
<smiling>
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Aug, 2004 08:26 pm
Trip out. An unexpected face of the Islamic Republic of Iran:

The Iranian government holds a conference on transsexuality, a cleric is encouraged to write a thesis about it "to change the social stigma attached to these people", the government and the Imam Khomeini Charity Foundation pay for sex-change operations, and a NGO about it was founded by the head of the Special Court of Clergy and the vice president for women's affairs? Who would have thought?

Quote:
As Repression Lifts, More Iranians Change Their Sex

By NAZILA FATHI
Published: August 2, 2004

TEHRAN, Aug. 1 - Everything about Amir appears masculine: his broad chest, muscled arms, the dark full beard and deep voice. But, in fact, Amir was a woman until four years ago, when, at the age of 25, he underwent the first of a series of operations that would change his life.

Since then he has had 20 surgical procedures and expects another 4. And Amir, who as a woman was married twice to men - his second husband helped with the transition and remains a good friend - is now engaged to marry a woman.

"I love my life and I'm happy, as long as no one knows about my past identity," said Amir, who asked that his full name not be published. "No one has been more helpful than the judge, who was a cleric and issued the permit for my operation."

After decades of repression, the Islamic government is recognizing that some people want to change their sex, and allowing them to have operations and obtain new birth certificates.

Before the Islamic Revolution in 1979, there was no particular policy regarding transsexuals. Iranians with the inclination, means and connections could obtain the necessary medical treatment and new identity documents. The new religious government, however, classed transsexuals and transvestites with gays and lesbians, who were condemned by Islam and faced the punishment of lashing under Iran's penal code.

But these days, Iran's Muslim clerics, who dominate the judiciary, are considerably better informed about transsexuality. Some clerics now even recommend sex-change operations to those who are troubled about their gender. The issue was discussed at a conference in Tehran in June that drew officials from other Persian Gulf countries.

One cleric, Muhammad Mehdi Kariminia, is writing his thesis on transsexuality at the religious seminary of Qum.

"All the clerics and researchers at the seminary encouraged me to work on the subject," he said in an interview. "They said that my research can help change the social stigma attached to these people and clarify religious decrees on the matter."

One early campaigner for transsexual rights is Maryam Hatoon Molkara, who was formerly a man known as Fereydoon. Before the revolution, under the shah, he had longed to become a woman but could not afford surgery. Furthermore, he wanted religious guidance. In 1978, he wrote to Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who was to become the leader of the revolution but was still in exile, explaining his situation.

The ayatollah replied that his case was different from that of a homosexual and therefore he had his blessing.

However, the revolution intervened and men like himself or those who had already changed their sex were harassed, even jailed and tortured. "They made me stop wearing women's clothes, which I had worn for many years and was used to," Ms. Molkara recalled. "It was like torture for me. They even made me take hormones to look like a man.''

It took him eight years after the revolution, in 1986, to get government permission to proceed with surgery. But he could not afford the surgery and did not have it until 1997, when he underwent a sex-change operation in Bangkok. The Iranian government covered the expenses. Four years ago, Ms. Molkara established an organization to help those with gender-identity problems. Co-founders include Ali Razini, head of the Special Court of Clergy, a branch of the judiciary that only deals with clerics, and Zahra Shojai, Iran's vice president for women's affairs. An Islamic philanthropic group known as the Imam Khomeini Charity Foundation has agreed to provide loans equivalent to about $1,200 to help pay for sex-change surgery.

http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/08/02/international/02iran.jpg
Maryam Hatoon Molkara, who was formerly a man known as Fereydoon, was an early campaigner for the rights of transsexuals in Iran.

Read on ...
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Aug, 2004 08:33 pm
A paragraph from further down the article still:

Quote:
Dr. Bahram Mir-djalali, one of Tehran's few sex-reassignment surgeons, said one of his patients had been a member of the Revolutionary Guards who served five years in the war with Iraq. His operation was paid for by a Muslim cleric he had worked for as a secretary. After the surgery, the man-turned-woman divorced, and then married the cleric.

True love, eh?

Though when I thought about this example a second time, a possible speculation dawned on me - I am assuming homosexuality is still a mortal sin to Iran's state and clergy? In that case, with this particular, unlikely couple in mind - is transsexuality perhaps used as a "solution" to the problem of being gay in a state that won't accept it?

Just speculating ... but all of the above sure defies some preconceptions about Iran, eh?
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Aug, 2004 04:58 pm
Dutch news broadcast did the usual report on the renewed Sadr-inspired violence southern Iraq, including the statement by the Iraqi government that Iran-produced weapons were found in Najaf.

What followed was a useful little graph, which neatly went beyond the usual two-side perspective. Iran's powers that be, it explained, are themselves greatly divided. Three lines: reformers, pragmatic conservatives, and ideological conservatives. The reformers probably support SCIRI, the Iraqi shi'ite organisation that has taken a surprisingly co-operative stance since the American invasion. The pragmatic conservatives, in their turn, support Ayatollah al-Sistani, whose views may be undilutedly fundamentalist, but who prefers the political road and condemns the current violence. But ideological conservatives support Sadr and his violent struggle against the American occupiers.

Way I see it, each could have their own motivations. A democratic neighbouring Iraq would, over time, pressure the Iranian government to itself venture some renewed reforms - good for reformers. For pragmatic conservatives the goal is to promote like-minded religious authorities in Iraq, but a concern for them, the report noted, may be that the holy cities in Iraq are the most important for Shi'ites - and if Iraq were to become a Shi'ite religious state, Iran would lose its position as the political center of the Shia. For ideological conservatives in Iran on the other hand, promoting the religious fight in neighbouring Iraq is a useful way to distract attention from the call for reforms at home, remobilise some sort of popular fervour for the long-faded Islamic revolution, and pressure the Iranian government by proxy to stick to its guns.

Absent in the three lines, of course, is the Iranian population at large, which doesnt care much about conservatives either pragmatic or ideological. Big question remains, then ... does it, in its turn, care much about any of it, at all?
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Aug, 2004 06:05 am
Ok, next round,maybe a good step in the right way:

Iran gets Queen

Quote:
ROCK icons Queen, fronted by outlandish gay icon Freddie Mercury, have become the first rock band to be given the official seal of approval in Iran.

A record company source said an album of their greatest hits has been released in the country.

Mercury, who died of AIDS in 1991, was proud of his Iranian ancestry and supposed Zoroastrian origins.

It made Queen one of the most popular bands in Iran, but western music is largely frowned upon in the Islamic republic, where homosexuality is considered a crime.

"Authorities approved of the tunes that had a social theme, leaving out the love songs," an executive in the company said.

The album contains smash hits such as Bohemian Rhapsody, Miracle and I Want to Break Free.

Western music is strictly censored in Iran and those selling foreign music need special permits, although millions of bootlegged banned CDs and cassettes are sold on the black market throughout the country.

The album is already selling very well. "It is the first rock album to hit the market legally and people are surprised and pleased to see it has the lyrics, not just the music," said Akbar Safari, a salesman at a Tehran book and record store.

The cassette, costing less than one US dollar, comes complete with explanatory leaflet, which tells rock fans that Bohemian Rhapsody is about a young man who has accidentally killed someone and, like Faust, sold his soul to the devil. On the night before his execution he calls God in Arabic, Bismillah, and so regains his soul from Satan.

Other western acts to have had albums of selected songs released on the official Iranian market are Elton John, Julio Iglesias and Gypsy Kings.

There are also books containing original and translated lyrics by many western singers such as Leonard Cohen, Celine Dion and even white rap artist Eminem, published to respond to the ever increasing demands of a nation where 70 per cent of the population is under 30.


Link
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Sep, 2004 06:49 pm
Queen, sexuality ...changes...

The govt's desperate move to soften their image to the younger generation---and appease the dissenters?

Looks like.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2004 06:05 am
Hey Sofia! On the Reform and revolution in Iran thread, I just posted excerpts from a four-day diary of an Iranian exile who travelled back to Teheran, it's really interesting. Entry 1 just gives a taste of the mood, entry two delves into the underlying soul of the country, so to say, and entry 3 is all about the Basij - the youngsters' vigilante the regime has set up.

But thus far I find entry 4 most interesting: it really summarises the contradictions and present state of the country quite evocatively. The image it provides is far removed from the stereotypes of the "Not without my daughter" kind, but it's not necessarily optimistic, either. It suggests a vibrant, bustling country with a rebellious-minded new generation - that's saddled with the chaos of every-day corruption and the suffocation of a stultified, repressive regime, with little perspective of any change soon after the disillusionment of seeing the reform movement of the last decade clamped down on and wither away.

In a way, perhaps a little like China, then, rather than the Gorbachev-era Soviet Union?
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Sep, 2004 04:12 pm
Thanks for your work, nimh! I'll read with relish. The reality of changes in China is something that does look sort of like what they seem to be attempting in Iran.

China gets to call themselves Communist, while actually moving so stridently toward Capitalism (sort of secretly)--and Iran can practice political schizophrenia, as well. The problem is when Saudi did this--the result was crazed terrorism. Hope Iran doesn't follow suit.

But, how would you characterize the Gorby revolution as different from China's and Iran's? (Love to pick your massive cranium...)
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Jun, 2005 06:00 pm
Bump for current trends in Iran.

Knew this jewel was in here somewhere.

From the beloved Roundtable usergroup... <sigh>
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Apr, 2006 10:42 pm
My, how time flies when you're building nukes.
0 Replies
 
JamesMorrison
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Apr, 2006 11:36 pm
Hey Lash.

A Torpedo that kills warships and submarines? Why bother when all is required is a Yemeni skiff disquised a a trash pick-up boat headed for the likes of the USS Cole? Surely the Iranians have better threats against the Great Satan then improved late 19th century naval weapons?! Perhaps the Iranians are trying to send a message. But to whom and in what context? Maybe it was just a slow news day for the AP. Do the Iranians really want to get into a pissing contest with the U.S. military? Perhaps this was meant for local Arab (al jazzera) consumption.

Oh Well.

JM
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Apr, 2006 11:58 am
Wasn't that WILD?? It did seem like sabre rattling for local consumption, but it really took me aback!

I'm trying to figure out what they're ultimate goal is. They've really made enemies with El Baradai, the UN is staring daggers at them, and we're a couple of sabre rattles from scrambling fighters...<it seems>

What are they trying to achieve?

It seems like the implications of "trying to rally the home team crowd" could have much worse negative effects than whatever positive they could derive...unless it's to stoke the Iranians for war.

Anyway, this is so curious. Nice to hear from you.
0 Replies
 
timberlandko
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Apr, 2006 04:07 pm
I think the Iranians indeed are playing to the home crowd, and I think the Iranian leadership does not recognize the danger in which they are further placing their regime thereby.

This strikes me very much like the energetic chihuahua yapping defiantly at the somewhat irritated, but as-yet-not-particularly-agitated rottweiler.

While it is possible the Iranians have come up with adaptations and modifications suiting these "new weapons" to their particular circumstance and application, they are by no means "new weapons" nor of indigenous Iranian concept and design; they are if not outright purchases, then licensed domesticly manufactured examples of existing Russian/ex-Soviet and Chinese technologies. The weapons systems the Iranians are touting long have been known to The West.

And, while it is possible a weapon of type might be able, under just the right circumstances, to achieve a kill, the launch entity for that weapon would cease to exist very soon after launch, possibly even before detonation of the weapon's payload. And that, of course, presupposes any appropriate launch entity might be able to enter the battlespace in the first place - itself far from a given.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Apr, 2006 05:48 pm
Was typing this in the WMYST thread on a short Iranian doc I saw tonight - wait - here, this one: ZINAT (Ebrahim Mokhtari / Iran / 2000 / 54 min):

Quote:
This Iranian doc, by the way, was about a woman in a small village who had already defied tradition and religious dogma by casting aside the weird kind of half-mask women wear there and starting work as a nurse - and now (this was in 2000 or so) did the unimaginable and stood as a candidate for the village council. Unheard of, and we see a friendly elder sitting down with her and talking in pleading, lecturing, arguing circles to try to dissuade her. But she is a bubbling, no-nonsense fountain of ideas and ambitions: to set up a school for girls, foremost, and the village road should be paved, there should be sport facilities for the kids so they dont turn to drugs and also outside sport facilities for girls so they dont need to hide inside to play, and this, and that, and why hasnt the village council done anything in fifteen years?

She's a short, young, enthusiastic thing, a loving woman who as nurse runs around the surrounding villages non-stop to take care of the villagers, calls them her 600 children; she's visibly elated by the camera and all the attention, and bursting with excitement about it all, sending boys out to the voting station to find out more news, and more news. The coolest thing though is how she and her husband interact: because he is also standing for the same elections (!), yet never says a word to stop her. He's all smiling gentleness and endearment, and the edge of competitiveness between 'em that also visibly shows up is more cute than anything else.

The conversation with the elder is hilarious, he is using everything from flattery (but you have found your mission, and you are brilliant for it - be a nurse, you wont have time to travel here and there!) to pleading to loyalty (but why not trust your husband, he's on the list too, why not let him take this one on him?), to bizarre back-to-front folk wisdom (women have more sins than men! Why? Well, why are they buried three meter down, and me two meter? Because they have more sins!). But she matches him every step of the way (and what did you say when I first wanted to be a nurse? The same things, all the same things! And where does God say that..), and both woman and husband break into friendly laughter when the elder pleads with the nurse that, why do women have to cover up when they go out alone? Well, because women - every look at them or from them is like a shot at the man's heart!

Basically, they're just having this lively, eager debate like any of us, which all the while remains comradely and friendly. Is the glass half full or half empty? Some of the stuff the elder says are mindbogglingly superstitious stuff, yet there they are, the old man and the young woman, having this open, frank and good-natured fierce discussion in the first place - aint a thing he gets past her!

Plus, of course ... yes, she did get elected! ;-). She and some 500 other women in villages and districts around the country, apparently, back then. And according to the closing titles, within a year there was a paved road - and a school for girls.. who could have wondered, with her on the council?

Of course, God knows what's happened to her now, five years on, considering the changes in Iran since Khatami's heyday. But thats no longer WMYST.
0 Replies
 
JamesMorrison
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Apr, 2006 11:46 am
About 6 months back I read a column (the author now escapes me) that proposed the whole Iranian nuclear effort ,or more specifically, the brouhaha itself, was an effort by the Iranian leaders to deflect attention (internal and international) away from possible political dissent within Iran itself.

Whether this is true or not, it must be noted that us outsiders have heard very little about Iran's internal political dissenters. From what I read in the column, life for such potential dissidents has become increasingly bleak and the religious "Police" still have a relatively free rein to terrorize the populace at will.

Nimh's story, again, shows us the value of the "other half" of our species. Culturally women are sometimes allowed such ebullient outbursts because, like children, their unbridled passion is considered endearing. But, like children, sometimes they speak pure unadulterated truth which is hard to argue with. Like John Adams once said "Facts are stubborn thingsĀ…". What the nurse was suggesting was good for the many but the elders were more concerned with the slippery slope that leads to the unknown. After all, how can the elders predict what type of havoc will ensue when women have a regular say in, of all things, politics?

JM
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Apr, 2006 01:00 pm
Two very contradictory impressions of what is going on in the minds and hearts of Iran.

The first story, in particular, is revealing and alarming.

Revealing re: how freely people (still) express their opinions, feelings - there's the suggestion of a vibrant society, more or less ignoring their government as best they can.

Alarming, re: how the government is getting to clamp down on even something as trivial and personal as text messaging.

That is a definite escalation from the past decade, in which it seemed like the regime had more and more gotten to leaving people to do their own thing as long as they were not actively agitating against it.

It also suggests something about the extents the current government might be ready to go to, to restore discipline and loyalty - I mean, imagine the manpower involved in the monitoring of text messages!

Quote:
Heard the one about the president?

Robert Tait in Tehran
Friday April 14, 2006
The Guardian

The misdirected email or text message is a hazard of our age. It can sour relationships and upset the closest of our friends. But now a stray electronic missive has been blamed for a spate of arrests, a national scandal and a very grumpy president of Iran.

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Islamic nation's firebrand leader, has taken umbrage at an unwelcome text received on his mobile phone. According to whispered accounts in the Iranian capital, his ire was stirred when someone sent him a joke suggesting he didn't wash regularly enough.

Although officials claim he possesses a lively sense of humour that belies his rather hairshirt image, on this occasion it suffered a serious failure. Realising the joke was doing the rounds of Iranian mobile phones, the notoriously temperamental president lodged an official complaint with Iran's judiciary department.

That in turn has acted as a pretext for an official purge of the SMS system in the country. Mr Ahmadinejad has since told his staff to pay close attention to all jokes circulating about him by text.

An anti-regime website called Rooz Online claims that under the crackdown the head of the country's mobile phone company has been sacked and four people arrested and accused of colluding with the Israeli foreign intelligence service, Mossad.

But poking fun at the president has becoming a national pastime in Iran. In a fusillade of seditious traffic, the regime's senior figures and its most sacred policies are all fair game - with Mr Ahmadinejad a particular target.

One joke tells of a man who has died and gone to hell, where he sees the famously strait-laced Mr Ahmadinejad dancing with the Hollywood star Jennifer Lopez. "Is this Ahmadinejad's punishment?" he asks.

"No," goes the reply. "It is Jennifer Lopez's punishment."

Another recent joke poked fun at Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, listing characteristics he supposedly inherited from five prophets: Muhammad, Moses, Jesus, Noah and Solomon. Insulting the supreme leader - or the prophets - is a jailing offence in devoutly religious Iran.

Others concentrate heavily on sex, another taboo with Iran's religious hierarchy. One purports to reveal official statistics of what men do after sex: "2% eat; 3% smoke; 4% take a shower; 5% go to sleep: 86% get up and go home to their wives."

The previous assumption was that this exchange of bawdy jibes and political satire could be made without detection. But now senior police officers have announced that they are acutely aware of it and say jokes intercepted could be treated as criminal behaviour.

Particular attention is being paid to jokes comparing Iran's nuclear programme with sex. Several people are widely believed to have received court summonses for sending nuclear-related jokes.

"While the outcome of the recent arrests in connection with SMS messaging is not clear yet, what is certain is that SMS jokes have already put some people into serious trouble," wrote the website Rooz Online.

The clampdown is in line with the authorities' uncompromising stance on the internet and bloggers. Wary of modern communications as a means of spreading political dissent, Iran is second only to China in the number of websites it filters - using technology made in America.

Read on..


Quote:
The Iranians applaud President Ahmadinezhad's intransigence

Le Figaro
13 April 2006

Before the small kiosk Muhammad Amini, 25, scans the Iranian dailies, all of which, without exception, highlight Iran's entry into the club of countries having nuclear technology. "The dream is coming true," proclaims the cover of the journal Iran. The conservative daily Keyhan welcomes the "historic turning point" that it says propels the Islamic Republic into the rank of "the most powerful countries of the Middle East." A smile on his lips, the young Iranian civil servant has only one comment: "We had to wait until the election of Ahmadinezhad for Iran to stand up to the West!"

In June 2005 he did not vote for the ultraconservative president, but this latter plays skilfully on the nationalist feelings of the Iranians to unite the population around the nuclear question. According to a survey of university professors conducted in March 2006 by the National Information Centre, some 60 per cent of those questioned opposed Iran suspending its uranium enrichment activities. However, it is difficult to verify the independence of such a survey.

Generally speaking, the media propaganda plays in favour of Ahmadinezhad. In recent weeks state television and radio have been showing a growing number of special programmes on Iran's "indispensable" resort to nuclear technology. Yesterday [12 April] this propaganda made it into certain schools, where the children were summoned to gather on the playground to chant, in chorus: "Nuclear energy is our absolute right." In this context, woe to the brave Iranian critics and journalists who would dare to weaken this consensus. The Culture Ministry has circulated a letter ordering local reporters to no longer write about the Western threats of economic sanctions against the Islamic Republic, to avoid frightening the population.

Read on...
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 May, 2006 09:15 am
timberlandko wrote:
I think the Iranians indeed are playing to the home crowd, and I think the Iranian leadership does not recognize the danger in which they are further placing their regime thereby.

This strikes me very much like the energetic chihuahua yapping defiantly at the somewhat irritated, but as-yet-not-particularly-agitated rottweiler.

While it is possible the Iranians have come up with adaptations and modifications suiting these "new weapons" to their particular circumstance and application, they are by no means "new weapons" nor of indigenous Iranian concept and design; they are if not outright purchases, then licensed domesticly manufactured examples of existing Russian/ex-Soviet and Chinese technologies. The weapons systems the Iranians are touting long have been known to The West.

And, while it is possible a weapon of type might be able, under just the right circumstances, to achieve a kill, the launch entity for that weapon would cease to exist very soon after launch, possibly even before detonation of the weapon's payload. And that, of course, presupposes any appropriate launch entity might be able to enter the battlespace in the first place - itself far from a given.



Iran may have acquired SS-N-22 Sunburn, SS-N-26 Yakhont, and SS-N-27 Sizzler anti-ship missiles from Russia.

They are not systems to take lightly. The Sizzlers in particular close in on their target at Mach 2.9.
0 Replies
 
 

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