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I NEED HELP IN UNDERSTANDING LATVIANS

 
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 May, 2003 09:20 pm
Here are a couple of sites you all might be interested in:

http://www.latvians.com/
http://www.latviansonline.com/index.shtml
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 May, 2003 10:10 pm
i remember that latviansonline site. good stuff.

so littlek, dlowan and i want to go to latvia. hmmmmm. let's start saving.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 01:11 am
[quote/merryandrew="Ms. Olga -- what a perfect description of me!" Very Happy

Very Happy Very Happy
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 01:39 am
Andrew

Thanks for the links and explanations!
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margo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 12:33 pm
MA
I'm sorry now I didn't take up your suggestion of going to Latvia when I'm in Europe next.

I decided to go and beat up the Brits instead! Twisted Evil
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 12:44 pm
Margo -- so alter your itinerary. It's a relatively short hop from London to Riga. I'm just not sure whether there are direct flights. You might have to change planes in either Frankfurt or Copenhagen.
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 01:07 pm
Thanks, Andrew for explanation. Now I understand, though, I have never heard of any Russian noblemen having Latvian serfs, the serfs of Russians usually were Russians themselves, and majority of the serf-owners in Baltic areas were either German barons that were subjects of the Russian Empire (Russians used to call them Ostsee Germans) in Latvia and Estonia, or Poles in Lithuania. I think, it is more likely that intermarriages contributed more to Slavification of the Latgallian surnames.
By the way, since it was very uneasy to get a permission for a foreign trip in the USSR (even to GDR), many Russians spent their summer leaves in Riga or Tallinn in order to feel themselves for a while "as if in the Central Europe" (some of them confused Latvians and Estonians with ethnic Germans). Well, historical center of Riga looks very much "Teutonic", for explicable reasons. I cannot say anything about Estonian Tallinn, since I have never been there.
By the way, are Latvian Christians Roman Catholics or Lutherans?
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 01:28 pm
I hope to someday visit Estonia, Latvia, and those countries north of the Black Sea. Also wouldn't mind a revisit to Russia. c.i.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 01:50 pm
Those cities certainly look "teutonic" - it's called Brick Gothic and was the main architecture style during the Hanseatic times.

(Unfortunately, there is only a Swedish site online of the "Projektet EUROB - European Route of Brick Gothic, whic will run from Germany/Denmark through Poland, Latvia, Estonia.)

re. Religion
Quote:

In 1935, before Latvia's occupation, official statistics indicated a fairly broad spectrum of religious traditions. Evangelical Lutheranism was the single most widespread creed, claiming the attachment of 55.2 percent of the population and 68.3 percent of ethnic Latvians. Roman Catholicism was the second most popular choice, preferred by 24.5 percent of the population and 26.4 percent of ethnic Latvians. Because it was especially entrenched in the economically less-developed southeastern province of Latgale (70 percent in this region) and was commonly seen as being regional rather than national, Roman Catholicism's impact on the secular world of politics and culture appeared muted in comparison with that of Lutheranism. source: Religion around the World
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steissd
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 02:14 pm
C.I. wrote:
I hope to someday visit Estonia, Latvia, and those countries north of the Black Sea. Also wouldn't mind a revisit to Russia. c.i.

So do I. When I have enough time for travelling I would not mind to revisit Riga and to get a personal impression of Vilnius and Tallinn.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 May, 2003 09:03 pm
Steissd -- Walter Hinteler has answered for me (Thank you, Walter). The majority of Latvian Christians are Lutheran, with Roman Catholics constituting a sizeable minority. There is an even smaller minority of Russian Orthodox worshippers and this group includes a number of native Latvians as well as ethnic Russians and Ukranians. Latgale is largely Roman Catholic.
0 Replies
 
CodeBorg
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 May, 2003 01:28 am
Numbers are COOL. Here we go!
The U.N. Human Development Reports summarize overall statistics for 175 countries.

It tracks health, living conditions, economics, business, technology, military, environment, gender, and crime.
Get the complete report (292-page .PDF file) at:
http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2002/en/
Or all 15 data spreadsheets (from the report Appendix) in one zipfile at:
http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2002/en/indicator/indicator.cfm?File=index.html

I checked some interesting numbers for a few countries, as compared to ... LATVIA !


POPULATION INDICATORS
Code: Total % Annual
Population Pop. Growth
(millions) (1975 (2000
1975 2000 2015 -2000) -2015)

Latvia 2.5 2.4 2.2 -0.1% -0.6%
Lithuania 3.3 3.7 3.5 0.5 -0.3
Estonia 1.4 1.4 1.2 -0.1 -1.1
Poland 34.0 38.6 38.0 0.5 -0.1
Belarus 9.4 10.2 9.7 0.3 -0.4
Russian Fed 134.2 145.5 133.3 0.3 -0.6

Luxembourg 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.8 1.1
Sweden 8.2 8.8 8.6 0.3 -0.2
Germany 78.7 82.0 80.7 0.2 -0.1
France 52.7 59.2 61.9 0.5 0.3
Ireland 3.2 3.8 4.4 0.7 1.0

Canada 23.1 30.8 34.4 1.1 0.8
Mexico 59.1 98.9 119.2 2.1 1.2
Brazil 108.1 170.4 201.4 1.8 1.1
Japan 111.5 127.1 127.5 0.5 0.0
U.S.A. 220.2 283.2 321.2 1.0 0.8
1) From Latvia's population to plunge, says UN report:
"Even if fertility rates continue to increase, Latvia's population could drop to 1.33 million by mid-century, according to new projections by the United Nations.

Latvia, which now has the second highest negative population growth in the world, would maintain that ranking in 2050. The country's growth rate is predicted to increase from the current -0.93 percent per year to -1.51 percent per year by 2050."

2) Other social stresses and demographics are described at:
http://www.unece.org/stats/documents/ces/pau/1998/19.e.html




HEALTH INDICATORS
Code: Phys- Cigaretts TB Probability Life
icians (Annual Cases of Surviving Expectancy
(per /person (per to age 65 at birth
100K) 1992-00 100K) (female) (male) (years)

Latvia 282 .. 79 79.8% 56.9% 70.4
Lithuania 395 .. 76 83.6 59.7 72.1
Estonia 297 2009 52 81.9 54.8 70.6
Poland 236 2631 31 85.1 65.8 73.3
Belarus 443 2043 71 80.0 51.3 78.5
Russian Fed 421! 2081 91 77.0 46.4! 66.1!

Luxembourg 272 .. 9 88.4 80.1 77.4
Sweden 311 1060 5 90.8 84.8 79.7
Germany 350 1803 12 89.3 79.2 77.7
France 303 1772 10 90.1 78.0 78.6
Ireland 219 2246 12 87.7 80.0 76.6

Canada 229 1980 7 89.3 82.3 78.8
Mexico 186 794 16 80.8 69.9 72.6
Brazil 127 813 47 75.4 59.3 67.7
Japan 193 3076 32 92.1 84.0 81.0
U.S.A. 279 2193 6 85.7 77.4 77.0
3) I had no idea people smoke so much! In Japan, 3076 cigarettes per person per year amounts to 8.4 smokes a day, on AVERAGE across the whole population! That's equivalent as if once an hour, EVERY working hour, the entire country just stops -- and everyone smokes a cigarette. If you don't smoke one, then someone else smokes two.

And yet they still have the highest life expectancy at 81 years. Very strange.

4) Russians aren't doing so well, even though they have many more doctors.
Do doctors cause lower life expectancy, or does lower life expectancy cause more doctors? :wink:



ECONOMIC INDICATORS
Code: Adults Population Below GDP (A)* (B)* (C)*
Lacking Poverty Line (US$/person) Unemploy. Engin Engin
Funct'l $11/ $4/ $2/ Rate (%) Stdts R&D
Literacy day day day 1999 2000 men women (%) (ppm)
_________________________________________________________________________
Latvia .. .. 28% .. 6,264 7,045 14.1 11.5 29% 1,090
Lithuania .. .. 17% .. 6,656 7,106 19.7 14.2 38 2,031
Estonia .. .. 18% .. 8,355 10,066 12.9 12.2 32 2,164
Poland 42.6%! .. 10% .. 8,450 9,051 14.4 18.1 .. 1,460
Belarus .. .. .. .. 6,876 7,544 1.9 2.6 33 2,296
Russian .. .. 53%! .. 7,473 8,377 13.6 13.1 48%! 3,397

Luxembourg .. 0.3%! .. .. 42,769 50,061! .. .. .. ..
Sweden 7.5% 6.3% .. .. 22,636 24,277 5.0 4.3 31 4,507!
Germany 14.4% 7.3% .. .. 23,742 25,103 7.8 7.9 31 2,873
France .. 9.9% .. .. 22,897 24,223 7.1 10.7 25 2,686
Ireland 22.6% .. .. .. 25,918 29,866 3.8 3.5 30 2,132

Canada 16.6% 7.4% .. .. 26,251 27,840 7.5 6.8 .. 3,009
Mexico 8.6% .. .. 37% 8,297 9,023 1.6 1.9 31 213
Brazil 14.8% .. .. 26% 7,037 7,625 7.9 12.1 22 168!
Japan .. .. .. .. 24,898 26,755 5.2 4.7 23 4,960!
U.S.A. 20.7% 13.6% .. .. 31,872 34,142 4.8 4.7 .. 4,103
(A)* = Unemployment Rate, from http://unstats.un.org/unsd/demographic/social/unempl.htm
(B)* = % of Tertiary (college) Students in Science, Math, Engineering.
(C)* = Scientists and Engineers in R&D, research and development (people per million).

5) One out of five Americans are functionally illiterate! They can "read a little but not well enough to fill out an application, read a food label, or read a simple story to a child". Wow. Think about that the next time you wave a sign in somebody's face. (More info at Literacy Volunteers of America and National Institute For Literacy).

6) In 1999, 28% of Latvians were below the $4/day poverty line.
Latvians make about a fifth of what the average American makes, even less than people in Mexico or Brazil (according to the Gross Domestic Product, GDP per person). Though it seems Mexico has a much larger lower class, with 37% living on less than $2/day and all the real money going elsewhere.

7) MOST of Russia (53%) lives on less than $4/day. How does a country function?

8) Column (B) shows that 48% of all Russian university students go into Science, Math or Engineering. No other country is even close, although Japan has the most existing engineers, with 4,960 R&D people in each million. There are almost no scientists and engineers in Brazil.



Okay, enough fun for one day! :-D
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 May, 2003 12:25 pm
CodeBerg, Your observation about Japan's smoking habits and their longivity has been the subject of many investigations on health. It seems that their habit of drinking green tea seems to help reduce the effects of smoking. Just don't ask me why. c.i.
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 May, 2003 12:33 pm
Thanks for a good advise, C.I. I am a heavy smoker, and I shall switch to the green tea from the black one from tomorrow.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 May, 2003 08:46 pm
Guess I'll join you, steissd.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 May, 2003 08:49 pm
Just smoke the green tea!
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2003 09:49 am
a stick of tea? aren't you old-fashioned, margo. you beatnik chick, you.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2003 02:34 pm
Gad!! I had forgotten we used to call it 'tea.' Nowadays the kids speak of 'smoking trees.'
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2003 02:47 pm
Trees? Damn it, 't'ain't no tree. Kids have gotten away from the earth, I tell ya.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 May, 2003 02:49 pm
Oh, i don't know . . . the thought of a spleef so large that one would refer to it metaphorically as a tree . . . although somewhat duanting, hell yes . . . fire up my iron lung and pass that damned thing . . .
0 Replies
 
 

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