0
   

I NEED HELP IN UNDERSTANDING LATVIANS

 
 
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 03:01 am
When I think about Latvians, this is what comes to mind:
* Pointy noses and small chins.
* Mousy quiet people who walk along the sidewalk, blending in with the buildings (so as not to be followed by the KGB?)
* Old cobblestone streets and black-market vendors (turned Capitalist now!)
* A flat land, dairy, forest, bakeries, a few MIG's and not much else.
* Good beer. No. Really good beer.
* Everybody looks and sounds just like ... my Dad.
* Technically educated and motivated people. For pretty cheap too!
* One point on the Triangle of Triumph: Lithuania, Estonia, and the indominatable ... Latvia!
* Amber. Need I say more? Baltic Gold!
* Janis Vakars, Midsummer Night's Eve. Ah, the ... the... well it was something I tell you.
* Did I say good beer?

To those of you who have lived in or near Latvia or who have just visited the country, is any of what I have said true? Help me to understand the Latvian people.

(No stereotypes, please).
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 11,312 • Replies: 83
No top replies

 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 05:48 am
[I'm just wondering: do you get money for every 'click' on this thread? :wink: ]
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 07:29 am
You've nailed it CodeBorg. A perfect description of every Latvian I've ever met, keeping in mind that Merry Andrew and I did not quite connect the last time he was in New Mexico.

I have to wonder if they don't share an interesting trait of Native Americans. Each one of them, of course, walks in single file.
0 Replies
 
New Haven
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 07:48 am
Re: I NEED HELP IN UNDERSTANDING LATVIANS
CodeBorg wrote:
When I think about Latvians, this is what comes to mind:
* Pointy noses and small chins.
* Mousy quiet people who walk along the sidewalk, blending in with the buildings (so as not to be followed by the KGB?)
* Old cobblestone streets and black-market vendors (turned Capitalist now!)
* A flat land, dairy, forest, bakeries, a few MIG's and not much else.
* Good beer. No. Really good beer.
* Everybody looks and sounds just like ... my Dad.
* Technically educated and motivated people. For pretty cheap too!
* One point on the Triangle of Triumph: Lithuania, Estonia, and the indominatable ... Latvia!
* Amber. Need I say more? Baltic Gold!
* Janis Vakars, Midsummer Night's Eve. Ah, the ... the... well it was something I tell you.
* Did I say good beer?

To those of you who have lived in or near Latvia or who have just visited the country, is any of what I have said true? Help me to understand the Latvian people.

(No stereotypes, please).



I'm still trying to understand New Englanders!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 08:05 am
To understand New Englanders you must first understand Latvians.

<Is that deep, or what?>
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 09:19 am
Ahhhhhhh, sweet Latvia.




Never been there. It sounds like somewhere with good bread.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 10:06 am
<grin>
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 10:09 am
goodness - I haven't even understood Finland yet!
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 10:13 am
Nobody ever thinks about the Island of Yap, do they <sob>
0 Replies
 
Sugar
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 10:45 am
I can speak to one point. My tech company has a few ISP contracts in Latvia. Any contact I have had with them are incredibly pleasant and they are very technically savvy and have a great work ethic. It's always a pleasure to deal with my contacts there.

Maybe that sound a bit 'stereotypical', but that's just my professional experience.
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 10:55 am
I visited Latvia in May 1990, three months prior to having left the USSR. At that time the separatist trend there was very strong, and the fact of my speaking Russian made me some problems: the salespersons in the shops tended to ignore me pretending to having not understood (this was not true, since in the Soviet time everyone there knew Russian). The similar situation happened when I needed asking the way: I could not get an answer until I met the local Russian man. But, a positive point: unlike savage Chechens, the civilized Latvians never resorted to violence (I am not talking about 1944-52 when there were several foci of guerilla activity in the forests), either verbal or physical. They just ignored Russians.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 11:13 am
steissd wrote:
But, a positive point: unlike savage Chechens, the civilized Latvians never resorted to violence


Unlike vice versa, the year after ('91) ...
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 11:30 am
And what exactly happened in 1991? Did Latvians commit any terror attack against the USSR?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 11:43 am
steissd

Since you like -as you said on another thread- to hear the opinion of people, living actually there:
January 1991: A dream came true.. by Irina Jakovleva
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 11:57 am
Well, I never opposed Latvians' claims for independence, even when I was a Soviet citizen (I did not support this either being a loyal citizen of the USSR, but I did not have any principal opposition to such an idea). Unlike Chechens, they are mature and civilized enough to have a self-rule without becoming troublemakers and terrorists.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 12:16 pm
Before they broke up with Mother USSR, I thought Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia were the names of the mean step-sisters of Cinderella.
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 12:17 pm
baez, there's only two of them: labia and lungia.
0 Replies
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 12:20 pm
Well, not really.

I knew they spoke different languages and were forced to "Russification", following Stalin's linguistic theories (steissd, you can find that sort of stupid reluctance to understand in Catalonia, Spain: some of them "forget" Spanish untill they realize you're not Castillian and suddenly remember it, and turn nice).

I knew Latvians like wrestling, Lithuatians like basketball and Estonians like nordic skiing.
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 12:44 pm
Latvians like ice hockey as well. In the Soviet period they had quite a decent ice hockey team in Riga.
By the way, do Catalonians respond when they are being addressed in English? And who are Castilians? Are not they just "regular" Spaniards, since Castilia is an area in Spain?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 May, 2003 12:45 pm
I could get into nekkid skiing, too . . . no doubt about it . . .

Oh . . . nordic skiing . . . never mind . . .
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

THE BRITISH THREAD II - Discussion by jespah
FOLLOWING THE EUROPEAN UNION - Discussion by Mapleleaf
The United Kingdom's bye bye to Europe - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
Amanda Knox - Discussion by ossobuco
Sinti and Roma: History repeating - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
[B]THE RED ROSE COUNTY[/B] - Discussion by Mathos
Leaving today for Europe - Discussion by cicerone imposter
So you think you know Europe? - Discussion by nimh
 
  1. Forums
  2. » I NEED HELP IN UNDERSTANDING LATVIANS
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 11/25/2020 at 07:36:28