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The lost book of Judas

 
 
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 08:16 am
I think this is absolutely fascinating!

I'm curious about the reaction to this among the Christian community in particular and within other religions who make note of Jesus too.


Quote:
Day to Day, April 6, 2006 ยท Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John make up the four accepted Gospels of the Christian New Testament. Now a new gospel has been unveiled by the National Geographic Society -- one that focuses on the story of Judas Iscariot.

To most Christians, Judas is seen as a traitor, the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the Romans for 30 pieces of silver. But a newly restored papyrus document dating to the 2nd century AD portrays a very different man. Judas is shown as Jesus' best friend, asked by Jesus himself to betray his identity to fulfill the prophecy and liberate his soul to ascend to heaven.

The story of how this gospel was found, and the international effort to authenticate, conserve, and translate it, has been chronicled in the new book by Herb Krosney called The Lost Gospel.

The leather-bound papyrus codex, believed to have been translated from the original ancient Greek to the Coptic language around 300 AD, was found in the 1970s in a cave in the desert near El Minya, Egypt. It then circulated among antiquities traders, moving from Egypt to Europe to the United States. The codex languished in a safe deposit box on Long Island, N.Y., for 16 years before being bought in 2000 by Zurich-based antiquities dealer Frieda Nussberger-Tchacos.

When attempts to resell the manuscript fell through, Tchacos -- alarmed by the codex's rapidly deteriorating state -- transferred it to the Maecenas Foundation for Ancient Art in Basel, Switzerland, in February 2001 for conservation and translation.

Rodolphe Kasser, one of the world's leading Coptic scholars, was recruited to reconstruct the manuscript and to transcribe and translate the text. The 66-page manuscript contains not only the Gospel of Judas but also a text titled James (also known as First Apocalypse of James), a letter of Peter to Philip and a fragment of a fourth text scholars for now are calling the Book of Allogenes.

The National Geographic Society unveiled the only known copy of the Gospel of Judas on Thursday. The full story of the discovery and restoration of the Gospel of Judas can be seen on the National Geographic Channel. The first showing is Sunday, April 9, at 8 PM ET.

Additionally, the Gospel of Judas is featured on the May cover of National Geographic magazine. Pages of the codex will be on display at the National Geographic Society, and will eventually reside at the Coptic Museum in Cairo, Egypt.


http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5327692
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 08:51 am
And also here:

And also:

http://www.able2know.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=72480&start
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 08:56 am
Ooops.....

I even looked before posting!

Thanks, dlowan.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 08:59 am
The other book of judas thread is better than yours, Boom . . . it has MOAN ranting about the bobble . . . your thread ain't got a single bobble-thumper . . .
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material girl
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 09:18 am
Ive read that Judas was actually a good guy that Jesus liked, no betrayals what so ever.

Just shows how mixed up it all is.Who are we to believe if we need to.

So far we have-
Jesus is untouchable even tho he represents love
Mary Magdelene is a prostitute
Judas is a betrayer

NOW we have-
Jesus married Mary and had kids
Mary is a combination of 2 people and not a prostitute at all.
Judas was a good guy and Jesus said he would do good.

Personnaly I think it will be brushed aside like THBTHG/TDVC revelations.

Such a shame.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 09:54 am
Can't wait to read the translation.

Of course, bible-ly non-subscribers:

You don't believe his one any more than you do the other ones...do you?

Still, this is very exciting. Haven't the dates been authenticated? So, whether or not one buys the content, it was written in the biblical era, yes?

Thoroughly jazzed in this vector.
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Asherman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 10:55 am
Bear in mind, that the Book of Judas probably wasn't written until long after all the principle characters in the drama were long dead. The Gnostic Movement is, I believe, generally regarded as a late development amongst scholars. Still, it may be interresting reading.

Try "The Last Temptation of Christ" for an intereting view of Judas. That Greek could sure write.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 11:32 am
Then "new" text dates to the 2nd century so somewhere between 100-200 years after Jesus.

Your question is interesting on several levels, Lash.

Even if someone thinks Jesus is entirely fictional, or a conglomeration of different people, or was a real person just not the messiah, this provides an interesting twist on accepted story.

I think the whole editing process of what gospels made it into the Bible and what ones did not is interesting in and of itself.
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Lash
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 11:35 am
Agreed, Boomer!!

Dan Brown gets all the breaks!!
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 11:36 am
boomerang wrote:
I think the whole editing process of what gospels made it into the Bible and what ones did not is interesting in and of itself.


In that case, do an online search for "Origen+bio" . . . then, do an online search for "Eusebius+bio"--the former is the most important "editor" of scriptural texts, and was taken in the ancient church as the authority on which writings were authentic, and the latter was the man who had the final word on the four gospels, in their present form, being accepted as the established, dogmatic canon.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 12:35 pm
Thanks Setanta, for saving me some time! I'll do some reading....
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 01:21 pm
Urg.

I checked out that other thread. It is way too pretty of a day to get entangled in a crybaby v. snickery Jesus conversation.

I've got a wheelbarrow with my name written on it......
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 05:19 pm
Setanta wrote:
boomerang wrote:
I think the whole editing process of what gospels made it into the Bible and what ones did not is interesting in and of itself.


In that case, do an online search for "Origen+bio" . . . then, do an online search for "Eusebius+bio"--the former is the most important "editor" of scriptural texts, and was taken in the ancient church as the authority on which writings were authentic, and the latter was the man who had the final word on the four gospels, in their present form, being accepted as the established, dogmatic canon.


I have always thought of Eusebius as an arsehole, because of Vidal's take on him in "Julian"...or was that another dude called Eusebio?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Apr, 2006 05:23 pm
boomerang wrote:
Urg.

I checked out that other thread. It is way too pretty of a day to get entangled in a crybaby v. snickery Jesus conversation.

I've got a wheelbarrow with my name written on it......



Can we selectively conceal this thread?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Apr, 2006 01:10 pm
dlowan wrote:
Setanta wrote:
boomerang wrote:
I think the whole editing process of what gospels made it into the Bible and what ones did not is interesting in and of itself.


In that case, do an online search for "Origen+bio" . . . then, do an online search for "Eusebius+bio"--the former is the most important "editor" of scriptural texts, and was taken in the ancient church as the authority on which writings were authentic, and the latter was the man who had the final word on the four gospels, in their present form, being accepted as the established, dogmatic canon.


I have always thought of Eusebius as an arsehole, because of Vidal's take on him in "Julian"...or was that another dude called Eusebio?


I've not read Vidal's work, but Julian was born seven years after the Nicean council at which Eusebius' version of the four gospel canon was adopted as the sole correct scriptural canon of christianity. Eusebius died in about 341 CE, which was when Julian was about 9 years old. So i cannot really comment--other than to note their lives only barely overlapped.
0 Replies
 
Lightwizard
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Apr, 2006 01:28 pm
"Julian" -- one of Vidal's best books. I should reread it soon. So should some on this thread who really need to.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Apr, 2006 06:48 pm
Just looked up Eusebius...sounds like he was the same one...Julian's hated fella was a Bishop, deeply involved in church controversies and pettifogging debates about minutiae of doctrine.

I credit that book as one of those that got me out of being a christian!
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Apr, 2006 07:08 pm
Well, in that case, our Cunning Coney, Mr. Vidal was playing fast and lose with historical truth. Julian was born c. 332 CE--Eusebius died in 341 CE. That's my recollection, at any event.

I'll go look it up.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Apr, 2006 07:11 pm
Wikipedia has Julian born in 332 CE--so that part was correct. The Catholic Encyclopedia has Eusebius dying before 341 CE--so Julian is no more than nine years of age when Eusebius dies, or even younger.

Your boy Gore, there, was indulging a bit of poetic license, it seems.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Apr, 2006 07:24 pm
Lol! I believe Julain was seen as capable of reading and was reading Eusebius' stuff!
0 Replies
 
 

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