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Australia voting system

 
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2003 11:05 am
one day cricket doesn't!
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fbaezer
 
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Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2003 11:17 am
OK OK I understood you, wabbit!
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fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2003 11:19 am
(see how a little editing can turn a temporary slowdown into a discussion by a wise monkey and a smegging stubborn rabbit?)
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dlowan
 
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Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2003 04:26 pm
Verdampfted smegging ^^%$$ *&% ((*^%$ posts!
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Wilso
 
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Reply Fri 18 Apr, 2003 01:06 am
fbaezer, our upper house ballot papers often resemble tablecloths! Yet as big as some are, and despite the amount of complaints made, there are consistently more informal votes cast on the 6 by 4 inch house of rep ballots. Go figure.
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margo
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 12:49 pm
Many years ago, (somewhere in teh 70's) in my state (and Wilso's), there was a trial of optional voting at local government elections (where it's also compulsory).

This is the lowest level of government - streets and garbage and libraries. There was quite a lot of publicity, and the results were very interesting. The conservative vote was near the usual number (I think 70-80% of usual, but not sure). The left vote, socialist and independent votes just about disappeared. I think the number was about 20%.

Surprisingly, this trial lasted only this one local government election. There was no support for it being continued or extended to state or federal elections. It'd surely give us a different country to what we currently have.
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fbaezer
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 01:09 pm
Margo, do you think the optional voting method contributed in the shift of the electorate and was thus rejected?

Wilso, how do you manage to get the tablecloth sheets into the ballot box? I'm not that good at folding, myself.

You don't have those atrange American voting machines, do you?
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dlowan
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 05:49 pm
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! Teehee


And they are more table napkin size, really.

It could not have contributed to the shift in the electorate - was at a different level and very contained.
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fbaezer
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 05:57 pm
American voting machines are, for me, one of the big unsolved mysteries of life. I think they raise a lever or something.

[I've read that the newer ones fail the count "only under 1%". To me, that's a whole lot.]
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dlowan
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 06:02 pm
Indeed - can make all the difference, to paraphrase Frost...
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margo
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 10:49 pm
fbaezer

I think it didn't continue because of the huge swing to the conservatives.

In any election, the electorate is roughly divided 50/50 between assorted conservtives, and assorted socialist/environmental /others. While it may shift a bit one way or the other, and taking into account the fringe groups, elections are generally close.

The figures, in this single attempt, were roughly 4 - 1 for the conservatives. I think the effort to educate the electorate about voting, no longer compulsory, but a good idea, was just too much to consider.

Was interesting, though!

At present, we have a very conservative (Liberal) Federal government, but all the state governments are varying degrees of socialist.
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dlowan
 
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Reply Thu 24 Apr, 2003 10:57 pm
Socialist! If only they were the tiniest bit so! Bless 'em, they dare not even think a wee thought of such!
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