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Folklorico

 
 
Pitter
 
Reply Tue 20 Dec, 2005 07:04 pm
I was at a bed & breakfast recently in Bogota and the other guests were a couple, an American guy and Colombian girl who were in Bogota to try to straighten something out at the U.S. embassy. Seems she had a valid tourist visa to enter the United States but when she went to visit her boy friend she lied about something to the immigration officials and they sent her back to Colombia. (My understanding is she can't hope to reenter the U.S. now for at least five years but she didn't seem to grasp that.) The owner of the B&B and I were discussing the couples' problem later and she said "Well we Colombians are very folkloricos. This means a little lie here or a little lie there, a little breaking the law, going through a traffic signal etcetera does no harm and in Colombia it's understood and accepted behavior. The girl doesn't understand that in the U.S. you don't break into lines, run stop signs without slowing down or make little lies to Immigration."

So there you have it. That's a definition of folklorico you'll never find in your English/Spanish dictionary.
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Charli
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2005 10:39 pm
"Traditional"?
Was the owner of the B&B saying that Colombians "traditionally" tell a little lie here or a little lie there, break the law a little, go through traffic signals, etcetera? And, do they, "traditionally" behave in this manner? Hence, folkloricos.
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Pitter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2005 08:33 am
Yes that was what she was saying. But there are other meanings also. Say their house is broken into and robbed. Instead of being scandalized they might just shrug it off. That's also being "folklorico".
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Charli
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Dec, 2005 09:45 pm
If being robbed is . . .
Doesn't that mean having one's house robbed in Colombia is a "traditional" happening? Again, "folklorico"? That would fit for me - anything that says "this is the way it is here."

We're "traditional" - "the real deal": Westerners, Southerners, Easterners, etc. The way that most of us behave in our part of the country . . . or, in a particular country. This is difficult to say about Americans in general, because there are too many diverse cultures in the U.S. However, we "label" many other nationalities with many descriptive adjectives. "The _ _ _ _ _ _ are traditionally _ _ _ _ _ ."
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Pitter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2005 08:55 am
Re: If being robbed is . . .
Charli wrote:
Doesn't that mean having one's house robbed in Colombia is a "traditional" happening? "[/color]


Well for that maybe "typical" would serve better than "tradiitional".
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2005 09:03 am
Now, if it's also folklorico to shoot housebreakers. . . .
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