15
   

Wildlife in Your Life

 
 
Joeblow
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 08:37 am
@Region Philbis,
Ah.

It's a cool picture.
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 08:42 am
@Joeblow,

we've had maybe 9 or 10 in the house over the years.

can't say that i'm a fan...
Joeblow
 
  2  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 08:45 am
@Region Philbis,
What?!

Not a one off?

(eek)

0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 04:43 pm
@Region Philbis,
A bat on the ground during the day? Have you gotten checked for rabies?
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Aug, 2021 04:54 pm
@InfraBlue,

no.

it was in the kitchen, hanging from the spice rack.

it was in pretty bad shape, so i goaded it out onto the deck, then took the pic.

eventually it summoned the strength to fly away...
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  4  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2021 06:31 pm
On campus yesterday - a Lumholtz tree kangaroo having a squiz at the Cairns institute before heading back to the trees

https://i.pinimg.com/564x/32/cb/c8/32cbc8f7aebc468f621f2bdeb7a02855.jpg
0 Replies
 
Joeblow
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Oct, 2021 06:13 am
Within 10 minutes of arriving at the cottage yesterday, sitting alone on the deck, I watched a blue heron come in for a landing, then stroll half our lake front before walking out to the end of the dock, where it stayed for about an hour.

Then, moments ago, I watched seven swans swim by. Swans are not common on this lake. We saw a pair of them a few years ago, but seven is quite the sight.

It is so easy to decompress here. God I love it Smile
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Sat 9 Oct, 2021 06:29 am
@Joeblow,
I've had a blue heron patrolling my lower field for the past week or so. Incongruous as hell to watch him stalking prey (crickets or possible voles) in the tall grass!
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Oct, 2021 04:53 pm
Going for my morning trail walk (it is good for my physical and mental health I was told) around a pond, there is lots of woodland creatures - chipmunks, rabbits, squirrels, birds, turkeys, deer - that I come across frequently. Well the fall tends to bring out even more scurrying around looking for food storage.

I happen upon one squirrel and he sees me and runs up a tree that is overhanging the trail. Just as I walk under it - there is some noises like branches following or other debris from the tree and I think damn squirrel is he throwing things at me and just as I am under it - wham! At my feet the dumb thing had fallen out of the tree and he hit hard.

Fortunately he must not have been hurt too badly as he quickly got to his feet and ran back up the tree. Never seen that before.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2022 05:29 pm
Quote:
The new golden age of wildlife in New England

In the broadest sense, what we see in our backwoods and backyards today is a result of
something called the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, which eliminated
commercial hunting and put states in charge of implementing policies to restore
populations to optimum levels, and then keep them there.

For so-called game animals, this success has been remarkable. In 1900, when commercial
hunting was essentially outlawed nationally, there were only 500,000 white-tailed deer
left in the United States. Today there are 30 million. Massachusetts has an estimated
93,000, despite its small size and the country’s third-highest population density.
That’s far more than we’ve ever had, specialists say, even before European colonization.

Turkeys, which disappeared from the state sometime around the Civil War thanks to a loss
of habitat and overhunting, were re-introduced to Massachusetts in the 1970s, beginning
with 37 birds released in the Berkshires. Today, there are 35,000 of them, so ubiquitous,
even in urban areas, that they dropped off many people’s point-and-shout list, something
that has already happened with hawks and rabbits.
(bostonglobe)
The Anointed
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Apr, 2022 08:17 pm
@Region Philbis,
Every morning between 6 AM and 7, the wife and I sit out on the patio with our morning cuppa, as we watch anything up to 15 wallabies, feeding, fighting and playing on our front lawn. We live on a 20 acre allotment some 50 miles out of town.

Goannas and dingo's were our biggest problems, as we were losing livestock because of them. but we're smarter than them, and rather than kill them, we simply created better protection for our stock.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2022 07:44 am
@Region Philbis,
last year, I wrote:
we've had maybe 9 or 10 in the house over the years.
#11 was late last night, just as we were about to turn off the bedroom lights and zzz.

it came fluttering in, jes screamed, i screamed!

i got up, shut the bedroom door and proceeded to turn on every light in the house, adrenalin pumping.

eventually found critter downstairs, opened the front door, and out it went.

took a while for both of us to calm down enough to go to sleep...
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2022 08:43 am
@Region Philbis,
Yeah, that soft dry flapping sound – unmistakable!
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2022 09:38 am
Where I live wildlife has diminished with increasing rapidity. Around my property all I am aware of that's left are birds and squirrels. I leave fresh water out for them and toss a daily handful of raw peanuts for them. I don't try to befriend any of them because wild animals should in general shun the untrustworthy humans. With exceptions, of course.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2022 09:47 am
@hightor,
Quote:
that soft dry flapping sound – unmistakable!
we had the box fan on medium, so we didn't hear it.

this episode was eerily similar to a pervious bat encounter, same time of year...
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2022 02:16 pm
@Region Philbis,
It'll be a long time before I forget the sight of that critter just flying (fast!) in the upstairs hall.
0 Replies
 
Joeblow
 
  3  
Reply Sat 3 Sep, 2022 09:59 am
I watched a hawk take out a mourning dove in my back yard yesterday. It had him on the ground, when the dove managed to break free and fly about 15 feet before the hawk got him again. Not wanting to witness the ensuing carnage, mrjoe walked towards them, at which point the hawk took wing with the poor thing in it's talons. Ain't nature terrible and wonderful at the same time?
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 May, 2024 09:30 am
Quote:
When Cicadas Emerge, Things Might Get a Little Wet

This spring, when the ground temperature hits 64 degrees Fahrenheit, trillions of cicadas will dig their way up from beneath the soil across the Southern and Midwestern United States. In a rare so-called double emergence, two distinct cicada broods — one on a 13-year life cycle and the other on a 17-year one — will take to the trees to sing, eat and mate.

And though we may prefer not to think about it, considering their lodgings in the branches above, the cicadas will also eliminate waste in the form of urine. Despite their size, cicadas have an impressively powerful stream, scientists reported in an article published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers adapted a fluid dynamics framework based on features like surface tension and the effects of gravity to map out how animals of different sizes, from mosquitoes to elephants, might pee.

“It’s this beautiful physics-of-life perspective” to see all the data laid out in a single graph, said Saad Bhamla, a bioengineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who was a co-author of the study.

The jets of urine that cicadas produce, the research shows, have a velocity of up to 3 meters per second — the fastest of all the animals assessed in the new work, including mammals like elephants and horses.

Scientists have widely studied how creatures across the animal kingdom eat and drink, but few have delved into the mysteries of fluid excretion. Yet there are lots of reasons to explore how different animals urinate, Dr. Bhamla said. Understanding how animals’ bodies have evolved to solve their waste problems might offer new ideas for nozzle design, for example.
(nyt)
0 Replies
 
 

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