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BRENT PARIS?

 
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 09:24 pm
In the worst Chicago "projects," it was long taken as a matter of course that being incarcerated in "Statesville"--the prison in Joliet, Illinois--was a distinct improvement in one's living conditions. Small wonder that people who live in such ghettos have no compunction about rioting and burning their own neighborhoods.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Nov, 2005 10:25 pm
I remember hearing about Cabrini Green..
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 08:47 am
http://www.hammerfonts.com/normal/IMG/jpg/20_aulnay_sous_bois.jpg

An image of Aulnay-sous-Bois, it reminds me of "housing projects" in the ghettos of American cities.


Some of the latest news from France:

Reuters France reports:

Marche silencieuse contre la violence à Aulnay-sous-Bois (A Silent March Against the Violence at Aulnay-sous-Bois)

AULNAY-SOUS-BOIS, Seine-Saint-Denis (Reuters) - Plusieurs milliers de personnes ont participé samedi matin à Aulnay-sous-Bois (Seine-Saint-Denis) à une marche silencieuse pour faire cesser les violences urbaines de ces derniers jours.

Entre 2.000 et 3.000 personnes ont défilé pendant environ une heure dans les rues de la ville bordée d'immeubles d'une dizaine d'étages et jonchée de carcasses de voitures calcinées.

(Aulnay-sous-Bois, Seine-Saint-Denis (Reuters) - Several thousand people participated Saturday morning at Aulnay-sous-Bois (Seine-Saint-Denis) in a silent march to end the urban violence of these recent days.

Between 2- and 3000 people marched for about an hour in the streets of the city bordered by buildings of a dozen stories and lined with the bodies of scorched cars.)

This article is written in French, but may be available at the Reuters site in English.


Le Figaro reports:

Scènes d'émeutes et de vie ordinaire en Seine-Saint-Denis (Scenes of riots and of everyday life in Seine-Saint-Denis)

D'Aulnay à La Courneuve, en passant par Sevran, la Seine-Saint-Denis a connu un deuxième week-end difficile.

(From Aulnay to La Courneuve, passing through Sevran, Seine-Saint-Denis has known a second difficult weekend.)

Anne-Charlotte de Langhe, Saïd Mahrane, Christophe Cornevin
[07 novembre 2005]

DU SILENCE, avant que la colère ne gronde, avant la nuit. Devant la caserne des pompiers d'Aulnay-sous-Bois (Seine-Saint-Denis), peu de jeunes sont venus saluer le cortège emmené par des familles de toutes origines. Plus de deux mille personnes, dont dix élus, appellent au calme. Quelques enfants de la cité des Mille-Mille brandissent une banderole, «solidaires des pompiers». Au pied d'une tour, une vingtaine d'adolescents, cagoulés et gantés, huent le cortège. Le maire de la ville, Gérard Goudron, tente d'entamer la conversation. En vain. Il repart sous les insultes. Témoin de la scène, Gino, un déménageur de 22 ans, se désole : «Je les connais et je ne comprends pas pourquoi ils tiennent ce genre de propos.» Mais il craint surtout l'amalgame qui pourrait être fait par «les Blancs».

(Silence, before anger growls, before the night. In front of the fire station in Aulnay-sous-Bois (Seine-Saint-Denis), few youths have come to greet the cortege lead by families of all origins [various origins]. More than 2000 people, of which ten are elected officials, call for calm. Several children of the city of Mille-Mille brandish a banner which reads: "Solidarity with the Firemen." At the foot of a tower, a score of adolescents, hooded and gloved, jeer the cortege. The Mayor of the city, Gerard Goudron, attempts to strike up a conversation. In vain. He leaves admidst insults. Witness to the scene, Gino, a mover [i.e., as in an employee of a moving company] of twenty-two years of age, voices his sorrow: "I know them and i don't understand why they indulge in these types of remarks." But most of all he fears the amalgam which could be made by the "Whites."

This article is written in French--i don't know if one can find an English language version.

Bella Ciao reports:

Les colères des banlieues
3 commentaire(s).


(The Anger of the Neighborhoods--three commentaries [op-ed pieces])

de Laurent Mouloud

"Un désespoir immense...", résume Vincent, vingt et un ans. Voilà une semaine que la Seine-Saint-Denis s'est embrasée. Dans la nuit de jeudi à vendredi, au moins 150 véhicules ont été incendiés dans ce seul département.

("An immense despair . . . ", Vincent, twenty-one years of age, sums it up. It's a week now that Seine-Saint-Denis is embroiled. At night on Thursday and Friday, at least 150 vehicles have been burned in a single department [an administrative district].


http://fr.altermedia.info/images/gang5.jpg

An image of a gang member in the Seine-Saint-Denis district.


Liberation reports:


Policiers blessés à Grigny, écoles et tramways incendiés...

(Police officers wound at Grigny, schools and tramways burned . . .)

Dans la nuit de dimanche à lundi, la police a recensé 1.408 véhicules incendiées et 395 personnes interpellées • Deux policiers ont été atteints par des tirs de grenaille à Grigny (Essonne) •

(Overnight from Sunday to Monday, the police have counted 1408 burned vehicles and 395 people detained - Two police officers have been hit by buckshot at Grigny)

Au cours de la nuit de dimanche à lundi, la 11ème de violences urbaines, 1.408 véhicules ont été incendiés et 395 personnes ont été interpellées en France, selon le bilan définitif de la Direction générale de la police nationale (DGPN), le plus lourd depuis le 27 octobre.

(In the course of the night from Sunday to Monday, the eleventh night of urban violence, 1408 vehicles have been burned and 395 people detained in France, according the definitive summary of the National Police General Directory (DGPN), the heaviest since October 27th.)

This article is in French, and i do not see an English link.

**********************************************

This is the Google France page at which i found these articles--this url will probably expire soon, however, so it should be consulted soon after i post, if anyone is interested--how to access this page cached is beyond my skill. I will be posting this between 9:30 and 10:00 am, Monday, November 7.

Of course, all of this news is available in English, but i rather think you can do your own searches for that, and the place names and events described here can provide you key words for your searches.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 08:06 pm
Bree has just come home from Paris tonight.
I'm hoping she'll post about her impressions of the past week.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 08:19 pm
Just to keep the historical record straight as regards Chicago, the housing project which was a poster child for the worst nightmare imaginable and which was torn down a few yearsback was the Robert Taylor Homes. Cabrini Green is still up and running, a quite viable hell-hole. In fact, I got a ride right through the worst parts of it last year, accompanied by two of Chicago's finest and two visiting Latvian police officers of fairly high rank who wanted to see what an actual American slum ghetto looks like. Nobody was in uniform, but it's amazing how people immediately recognize an unmarked cop car.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 08:35 pm
I've only noticed, as you may discern, cabrini green from afar with sadness.

My niece whom I mention from time to time lived in Jordan Downs with mom at some point, that's in LA but similar.

a)I wasn't there
b)have some empathy on both sides of my extended family. I could go on and on about this, trying to be fair.

And further, this is my family by marriage now dissolved.

It is not dissolved to me.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 08:38 pm
Ah, whatever I may be talking about with family is not for me to put on anyone here. I get a little feisty on all this, but in fact, I know nothing or less.


That is the thing, most know less.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Nov, 2005 09:02 pm
...the Robert Taylor Homes....
yes, it's coming all back to me know. of course, we were uncomfortable driveing through that district. what really shocked us, was that people should be forced to live under such hellish conditions with really no way out of it.
we all know that there is hardly any city that doesn't have an area "on the other side of the tracks", but what we saw in chicago we have not seen in any other city in the united states or canada - even driving through st petersburg/russia, we did not see that kind of hopelesness. hbg
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Nov, 2005 04:48 am
Have you ever been to Detroit, hbg? Chicago can't hold a candle to some parts of Highland Park.
0 Replies
 
JustWonders
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Nov, 2005 07:52 am
If what MA says is true, this action by the Imams in France may only make matters worse, I suppose:

Quote:
Go home in the name of Allah, order imams with megaphones


http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,13509-1862160,00.html
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Nov, 2005 08:12 am
JustWonders wrote:
If what MA says is true, this action by the Imams in France may only make matters worse, I suppose


Yes, it seems so , and the article says similar.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Nov, 2005 01:53 am
Quote:
New police powers raise spectre of Seine pogrom

By Leonard Doyle, Foreign Editor
Published: 09 November 2005

Thus far, the police have responded with remarkable restraint. Aware that a truncheon brought down too hard on a youth's head or, worse, a rioter killed by police would add fuel to an incendiary situation, they have avoided brute force.

French policing is unrecognisable from the heavy-handed responses of previous years, not least 1968. But the government decision to adopt emergency powers to enforce curfews with a law originally passed to combat violence in Algeria in its war of independence has raised the stakes considerably.

An editorial in Le Monde warned yesterday that the decision to resurrect a draconian 1955 law will send a brutal message to the disaffected youth; namely that, 50 years on, France intends to treat them just as it did their grandparents.

The signed editorial was referring to one of the darkest episodes of modern France, one which remains largely unknown. On 17 October 1961, Paris police, led by a former Vichy minister, Maurice Papon, killed up to 300 protesting Algerians. Some were hurled, still alive, into the Seine.

The sequence of events has not been established, but at the core is an allegation that Papon, also accused of deporting more than 1,600 Jews to death camps during the war, gave police clearance to attack the protesters and dump them into the river. After a curfew was imposed in Paris following the murder of 11 police officers by nationalists, up to 40,000 Algerians arrived in the city centre. At the Pont de la Concorde Metro station police began striking people over the head with clubs.

Saad Ouazene, then a 29-year-old foundry worker and an organiser for the Algerian National Liberation Front, had his skull fractured. "I saw people collapse in pools of blood. Some were beaten to death," he said. "The bodies were thrown onto lorries and tossed into the Seine from the Pont de la Concorde."

Some 50 people were clubbed to death in the courtyard of the Paris police headquarters, according to the testimony of a number of shocked policemen.

Police records reveal that Papon, who was on the scene and later in the command post, told officers they must be "subversive" in the war. "You will be covered, I give you my word," he said.

After the massacre, dozens of bodies were taken from the Seine as far downriver as Rouen.

Attempts to publicise the massacre were censored. Jean-Paul Sartre called it a pogrom in Les Temps Moderne. Papon had the edition pulped.

It has long been alleged that Papon had tacit government backing. There has never been a full enquiry and the archives remain closed.

Papon, now aged 95, was jailed in 1999 for complicity in crimes against humanity. He was released in 2002.

Thus far, the police have responded with remarkable restraint. Aware that a truncheon brought down too hard on a youth's head or, worse, a rioter killed by police would add fuel to an incendiary situation, they have avoided brute force.

French policing is unrecognisable from the heavy-handed responses of previous years, not least 1968. But the government decision to adopt emergency powers to enforce curfews with a law originally passed to combat violence in Algeria in its war of independence has raised the stakes considerably.

An editorial in Le Monde warned yesterday that the decision to resurrect a draconian 1955 law will send a brutal message to the disaffected youth; namely that, 50 years on, France intends to treat them just as it did their grandparents.

The signed editorial was referring to one of the darkest episodes of modern France, one which remains largely unknown. On 17 October 1961, Paris police, led by a former Vichy minister, Maurice Papon, killed up to 300 protesting Algerians. Some were hurled, still alive, into the Seine.

The sequence of events has not been established, but at the core is an allegation that Papon, also accused of deporting more than 1,600 Jews to death camps during the war, gave police clearance to attack the protesters and dump them into the river. After a curfew was imposed in Paris following the murder of 11 police officers by nationalists, up to 40,000 Algerians arrived in the city centre. At the Pont de la Concorde Metro station police began striking people over the head with clubs.
Saad Ouazene, then a 29-year-old foundry worker and an organiser for the Algerian National Liberation Front, had his skull fractured. "I saw people collapse in pools of blood. Some were beaten to death," he said. "The bodies were thrown onto lorries and tossed into the Seine from the Pont de la Concorde."

Some 50 people were clubbed to death in the courtyard of the Paris police headquarters, according to the testimony of a number of shocked policemen.

Police records reveal that Papon, who was on the scene and later in the command post, told officers they must be "subversive" in the war. "You will be covered, I give you my word," he said.

After the massacre, dozens of bodies were taken from the Seine as far downriver as Rouen.

Attempts to publicise the massacre were censored. Jean-Paul Sartre called it a pogrom in Les Temps Moderne. Papon had the edition pulped.

It has long been alleged that Papon had tacit government backing. There has never been a full enquiry and the archives remain closed.

Papon, now aged 95, was jailed in 1999 for complicity in crimes against humanity. He was released in 2002.
Source
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