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Dare/dares

 
 
Rox111
 
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 04:55 am
Hello! I have a question regarding the phrase I saw while playing an online game. It's a bit confusing to me and I find the structure a bit awkward.

Here: "who dare challenge me?"

Shouldn't it be "dares" since "who" is third person singular?
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hightor
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 05:33 am
@Rox111,
"Who" is an interogative pronoun and can be singular or plural. If you ask, "Who is at the door" it could be one person or a group of people.
Rox111
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 06:03 am
@hightor,
Thanks! But is it also OK to use "dare" as a modal verb?

Example: "He dare challenge me?"

hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 06:36 am
@Rox111,
"He dare challenge me?" is incorrect. ("He" is singular.) However, "How dare he challenge me?" is correct.
Rox111
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 09:30 am
@hightor,
Even if it acts as a modal verb?

Another example: "He dare not do it."

hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 09:42 am
@Rox111,
It really depends on how the sentence is constructed:

Quote:
The verbs need and dare sometimes function as modal (auxiliary) verbs and sometimes as regular (lexical -- which would use an infinitive) verbs. Both verbs are called "marginal modal auxiliaries." In the modal construction, we would write: "He dare not go now." "Dare he go now?" "No solder dare disobey." "No one dare predict." In the lexical construction, you could write: "He dares to go now." "He doesn't dare to go now." "Does he dare to go now?"

- A University Grammar of English by Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum. Longman Group: Essex, England. 1993.
Rox111
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 12:50 pm
@hightor,
Thanks for being patient with me. Smile however, I still have one question left.

So, if the word dare is used as a main verb and not a modal verb in the phrase "Who dare challenge me?" then does this mean that phrasing it this way would also be correct? "Who want to challenge me?".

Since you stated that who is an interrogative pronoun and that it can either be singular or plural, I'm assuming "who want to challenge me?" Should also be correct.

I can give another example. Here: "Who want these candies?"

hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 04:21 pm
@Rox111,
It's possible to imagine a context where this usage would work but it's not a construction commonly found in normal speech. I lack sufficient knowledge to provide a detailed and authoritative your question. Sorry.

May I ask, are you a native English speaker?

Rox111
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jul, 2024 07:59 pm
@hightor,
I am not a native English speaker. Why?
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Jul, 2024 05:13 am
@Rox111,
Just curious. You handle the language very well. It's just interesting to me how many complicated grammatical rules are absorbed when you are immersed in the language for your whole life. Many native English speakers use the language correctly without any idea of the formal rules behind the usage. It just sounds "right". I like trying to answer these sorts of questions because I learn about rules of English which I was unaware of previously but still manage, mostly, to follow.
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