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The WildClickers take the train to the Rainforest. Track 61

 
 
Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 09:26 am
Danon, here's an interesting page of photos where you can view three pages of railroad antiques. There's a few photos of keys and locks too!

http://search.rubylane.com/search/,id=66.4.html

<Just a few clicks down the mountain <bout 40 miles> from Auburn <adding 14 mi. from my house> and thars Citrus Heights! Waving a "hi" to your bro n' family> Smile

more photos

Norfolk and Western Railway office, c. 1897. The Norfolk and Western Railroad Co. was the result of a reorganization of a number of existing railroads in 1881. The company was renamed the Norfolk and Western Railway Co. in 1896. The telephone on the wall is an 1882 vintage American Bell Telephone Co. phone manufactured by Western Electric Co. at its Chicago factory and referred to as a Chicago #2 bell with Blake
transmitter. (Identification by Tom Adams.) Image includes picture of President William McKinley (1897-1901), letter copying press, potbelly stove, and kerosene lamp.

http://www.officemuseum.com/Photo%20Gallery%201890s/1897_Virginia_Tech_nw3787_c._1897_phone_Y.jpg

Norfolk and Western Railway office. Picture includes Remington typewriter, rubber stamp rack, and electric lighting

http://www.officemuseum.com/Photo%20Gallery%201890s/1899d_Virginia_Tech_nw3845_Y.jpg
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 09:52 am
Stradee, Thanks millions.........

Here is a pic of something I have been carrying around with me since I was 5 yrs old. It was 1947, the war was over and long lines of troop trains were returning the soldiers to their homes. We were living in Baird, TX when a troop train came roaring through with the guys hanging out of windows, doors, etc. The soldiers would pitch stuff to us as they passed - like coins, and this helmet=
http://img74.imageshack.us/img74/8189/windtalker8me.jpg
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ul
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 12:23 pm
You travel fast- thanks for all the great pictures and the stories.
One of my many uncles was a station master in our little town. I loved to visit him, not only did he live in a railway house with a huge garden, but he allowed me to wind the gates up and down. When I was too much for him ( I was not a quiet, sweet little girl) he handed me over to an engine driver who passed this little station. I would go on the engine and travel with this guy to the next station, from there I was sent back with another train.
Blowing the whistle was so much fun.

The love for railroads is still there- we go often by trains.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 01:33 pm
ul, i'm searching for a photos of vintage railway houses! The neighborhood kids traveled each Saturday to the train tracks where there stood a house where the tracker worked each day.

Outside window shutters were painted white, and the wooden structure of the house painted red. Compared to the stark landscape, the place resembled a Kinkaid painting. There was also a small foot bridge the tracker had built, and alongside the house there were flower and shrub plantings. The guy was meticulous!

He talked with the neighborhood kids, answered railroad questions, and warned the boys that they should be very careful riding thier bikes near the rail tracks. Course he had no idea the kids were flying through the danged tunnel on their bikes, right? My dad, who knew absolutely every person on the face of the planet <so I thought> more than likely checked out every route the kids took each Saturday. Paulie <my best friend Frans' bro> was eventually banned from riding his bike to the railroad tracks after 'someone' told his dad he was the daredevil of the 3rd st tunnel. <grin> So our adventures to the rail tracks ended about the same time we began building coasters <ball bearings for wheels, and feet for brakes> sorta like modified Flexis'.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 01:40 pm
Yur welcome, Dan.

Nice hat! <what does the Aztec insignia depict?>
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ul
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 02:30 pm
Stradee, I will have to look for pictures ( grin: an absolute mess here- renovating the apartment).



http://www.klgv-oelpfad.de/images/bahnhof/bf-hz-1955-1_small.jpg
But this house is very similar to my uncle's house.
It was a bit out of town, surrounded by meadows and fields. On one side was the platform and the tiny ticket counter in a small waiting room.
The garden was on the other side. To have a garden was part of the meagre salary. The house was big enough for a family of 11. The attic was a wonderful playground.
What looks like a balcony is part of the railway control centre-
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ul
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 02:53 pm
The railroad bridge--
we walked to the middle and spit down- we were never caught, but someone must have seen us and the easy secret path was blocked.

http://82.165.28.118/shop/ak/35/357918.jpg
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Kara
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 03:18 pm
I am just checking in from Ireland. And clicking every day. (Hello Ul. Good to see you here.)

I am paging through this thread and loving the railroad memorabilia. My grandfather was a railroad engineer in Nevada and I went on his train with him when I was a little girl. He had a bushy beard and the striped cap, and he would lean out the window and wave to me when he left the station. He had to stop the train often to fill up the water tank for the boiler that powered the steam engine. In Nevada, there were huge tanks where the trains stopped while a long crane-dipper swung across to fill the water tank. I have early movie films of him in the cab and of the tank being filled.

I thought my grandfather had the most romantic and exciting job in the world, while my grandmother at their cottage in Elko NV went out at dawn to catch trout in the nearby stream for breakfast.
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 04:19 pm
ul, great photos! The train bridge architecture quite magnificent! Your Uncles house much more elaborate in design and stature, and what a neat place for kids! Away from town with plenty of room to ramble outdoors and indoors as well! Very cool.

An interesting photo found <still searching for tracker houses> at one of the zillion net train sites...


The former AT&SF (Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe--now Burlington Northern Santa Fe) depot in Las Vegas, NM. The depot is still an active passenger depot. The Amtrak "Super Chief" calls on the station twice a day--one train heading for points west (Albuquerque, Gallup, Arizona, and California) and the other heading for points east (Raton, Kansas, and Chicago).


http://www.geocities.com/tourist32/lasveg1.gif
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 04:34 pm
Hi Kara! Good seeing your post here at the Rainforest thread!

Thanks for sharing your terrific stories!

SPR Bayshore Station - San Francisco - 1917 <The house to the left of the photo may have been where the station staff resided>

http://webbie1.sfpl.org/multimedia/sfphotos/AAC-1718.jpg

1886 Photo of a Mission Street Rail Car <Nineteenth St & Mission>

http://webbie1.sfpl.org/multimedia/sfphotos/AAB-5874.jpg
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 04:53 pm
The Railroad House <before the 1868 quake>

http://webbie1.sfpl.org/multimedia/sfphotos/AAB-2379.jpg

after

http://webbie1.sfpl.org/multimedia/sfphotos/AAC-2551.jpg
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 07:07 pm
Glad to see you here, Kara - and to discover that you've also got a railway connection!

I'm still in recovery from the discovery that Ul was a little spitter Shocked

~~~~~~~

Great photos and stories everyone. I am really enjoying this trip.

~~~~~~~~

You and your 283 friends have supported 1,923,386.4 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 47,121.6 square feet.
You have supported: (0.0)
Your 283 friends have supported: (47,121.6)

American Prairie habitat supported: 36,139.8 square feet.
You have supported: (10,159.7)
Your 283 friends have supported: (25,980.1)

Rainforest habitat supported: 1,840,125.0 square feet.
You have supported: (161,636.3)
Your 283 friends have supported: (1,678,488.7)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1 Aktbird57 .. 1154 44.153 acres
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 07:12 pm
Me too, ehBeth, you made a good choice of topic.

Tomorrow, I don't know what time exactly, our company leaves and I will look for the T&P stuff to show everyone.

Great pics ul. Thanks
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 07:53 pm
Teenyboone, I just spotted you back there among the photos. Come on over here and sit with me. We can look out the window and chat as the fields run past.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This is the old train station in Rimouski, Quebec. I spent most of a night sleeping on a bench in this station in late summer 1972. I'd been living in Rimouski for most of the summer, taking a total immersion French language program.

Our class was going home by train, but first the train was delayed and then it was over-booked. Our teacher had already started home by car as I recall, so we slept in the station til the next train came in from the Maritimes to go to Quebec City at about 4:00 a.m.

http://rimouskiweb.com/photorim/HierScan/TrainGare.jpg


<now to see if I can find the pic of me leaping off the train when we got home>
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 08:00 pm
Which one a them is you in that picture . . . you sure did dress funny . . .
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Stradee
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 08:20 pm
ehBeth, great photo! Girl, you are the traveler! Smile

Dan, forgot (?) answering insignia question on soldiers hat? Not familiar with service patches and decals - am interested why the symbol placed on the helmet. Was it a fighting unit insignia?

Looking forward to more travel stories and photos tomorrow!

nynite
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 08:22 pm
That ensignia may have been that of the 45th National Guard Division, with troops from west Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. I'll go see.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 08:27 pm
http://www.pandkmilitaryantiques.com/products/45th%20Division%20patch.JPG


Oops . . . New Mexico, Colorado and Oklahoma . . .

The 45Th Division Living History Site wrote:
The 45th Infantry Division was one of 4 National Guard Divisions activated by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1940 with the possibility of war in the near future. The Thunderbird Division was from Oklahoma, Colorado, and New Mexico. After activation and as the war continued, many Thunderbirds came from other parts of the United States. Colorado's 157th Infantry Regiment, along with the 179th and 180th Regiments from Oklahoma remained with the division. New Mexico's 158th Infantry Regiment was sent to the Pacific.


The famous World War Two era cartoonist, Bill Mauldin, served with the 45th in North Africa, Italy and southern France. His "Willy and Joe" from the "Up Front" cartoon series, originally published in Stars and Stripes, were "Thunderbird Division" boys, one of them an Indian (the one with the hooked nose).

http://oddlots.digitalspace.net/upfront/NOCOMBAT.GIF
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Magginkat
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Jul, 2005 09:17 pm
What a great selection of pictures. Brings on a bad case of nostalgia!

What month in 1942 were you born Danon5?
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danon5
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Jul, 2005 09:02 am
Ahhhh, Sat morning and our company just cleared the end of the driveway heading for Nashville, TN............................ It's always good to see the kids - and, it's always good to see the kids go.

whew...... quiet here now.

Setanta, Thanks for the help - that insignia is also the unit featured in the recent movie "Windtalkers". Where the Native Americans were using their indigenous languages to talk in combat zones. I'm glad I managed to keep it all these years.

Magginkat, I was born 17 Sep 1942. I'm a virgin.

big grin

All clicked.
0 Replies
 
 

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