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How long can a dog go without peeing?

 
 
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 07:53 am
Green Witch - does your house have any terraces or patios with plants, that Lulu could consider as "outdoors" on such occasions?

If your husband has frequently been gone overnight previously, and Lulu only refused to go out on only this one occasion, it may well be that some danger to you both or to your home did exist, as others here have suggested. Having an emergency fallback 'outdoors' spot within the property (if possible) might be a good idea in addition to training.

Such small medical info as I have on the matter indicates you were right to worry: if the condition persists it can lead to serious problems.
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 09:10 am
Green Witch wrote:
Well, we survived the night and Lulu the Wonderdog finally pee'd at 7:30 AM (I'm sure you were all waiting with great anticipation for that info.), although she would not leave the property. I think Intrepid is correct and Lulu views me as "just the staff" for the dog pack here. She was supposed to be my dog, but bonded with Dog Daddy from day one when they discovered they both like to drag around heavy objects and eat things they find in the woods.

I sure won't rush home anymore worried that the dog has to pee.

She also hasn't pooped in 24+ hours, but Dog Daddy will be home soon and he can take over.

Thanks everyone.


Really glad to hear that Lulu has finally given you relieve, not to mention herself. It's time for you to start pushing your weight around with these canines. Make 'em understand that you are one tough leader and they better tow the line. Start showing your dominance over the most dominant of the dogs (obviously not Lulu) and the others will soon follow lead.

Good luck.
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 09:14 am
squinney wrote:
Green Witch - All of our dogs over the years have bonded with Bear. He happens to be the least one in the family to like dogs, and although I am the one to feed, water, take out, they have all chosen to sit with "Dad" to watch tv. They have all chosen to sleep cuddled up next to him. They have all waited for his command / approval to jump up on the bed at night. I could say it's okay, C'mon, and they would just look at me and wait for Bear to say it was okay.

With Bear in the hospital, I told Gracie "It's okay, c'mon" several times, but she wouldn't get on the bed last night. I finally said "Fine, sleep on the floor. Daddy won't be home tonight." She jumped up and went to his pillow and layed down. (Don't tell him!)

He works nights, so she should be used to him not being in the bed until 3 am. Dog instincts are just so fascinating. I have no doubt she knows something is up, just as LuLu did.


Squnney,
You are viewed as the hostess/waitress by Gracie. Most dogs respond to a low voice. That is why women are not necessarily viewed as dominant by dogs. When a dog needs to be corrected, most people raise their voice and yell at the poor animal. Doggy does not understand what that means. Instead, the voice should be lowered a couple of octaves to the normal speaking voice and you will be amazed at the difference in reaction.

You might want to try this with Bear as well ;-)
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 09:41 am
Intrepid - I was raised on a farm and have trained many animals. I do use a lower voice to command but Bear for some reason only reacts to "Mmms and Ahhs."

Any suggestions?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 12:28 pm
Good news about Lulu.

25 hours is a long time to hold out.

~~~~~~~

A bit of re-training of the pack is probably in order. You really need to be the alpha female.
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 12:30 pm
squinney wrote:
Intrepid - I was raised on a farm and have trained many animals. I do use a lower voice to command but Bear for some reason only reacts to "Mmms and Ahhs."

Any suggestions?

Uh, yeah. Give in. Laughing
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 07:52 pm
HofT wrote:
Green Witch - does your house have any terraces or patios with plants, that Lulu could consider as "outdoors" on such occasions?


That is bit of an understatement. I live on a 200 year old farmstead that also functions as a five acre plant nursery with extensive display gardens. Lulu has her pick of pee pee spots near and far from the house. She prefers her 100 acres woodland backyard for most business.

She is actually an obedient dog under normal circumstances. We often go sleding together (she pulls me on kick sled) and she has no trouble following basic commands when we are alone or with others. She is a little slow (we prefer the term "special ed dog" or "remedial") to learn something new, but once she gets it she obeys. She also knows to suck up to me because I'm the only one stupid enough to cook her chicken and rice for dinner.

I think I have to give her a little credit on the fear thing too. This morning after posting here I saw both very large bear scat and what looked like bobcat scat and prints near our pond. Large male black bears are very, very stinky and that could have been part of the problem. I rarely see signs of bobcat, so maybe it was the new scent. Anyone remember in "Little House in The Big Woods" when the dog saves the mother from a panther by not letting her out of the house? Maybe Lulu was acting out such a scene, because today she seems fine.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jun, 2005 08:46 pm
As the summer goes on male bears smell more and more like ambulatory cesspools. They eat and eat and eat, fattening up nicely. Their penises remain of modest size and the urine drenches the fur a dozen times a day.

Very, very stinky.
0 Replies
 
HofT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 1 Jul, 2005 04:12 am
Quote:
That is bit of an understatement. I live on a 200 year old farmstead that also functions as a five acre plant nursery with extensive display gardens. Lulu has her pick of pee pee spots near and far from the house. She prefers her 100 acres woodland backyard for most business.



Unless the grounds are surrounded by fencing sufficiently high (6 ft) and strong enough to stop a bear or other big animal you'll have to find or create some space close to the house that is; old farmhouses usually have an enclosed back yard with outbuildings.

You know of course dogs can smell better than even the most advanced machine and hear way beyond our own range, so there must have been some danger out there that night. Never doubt your dog's instinct!
0 Replies
 
 

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