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Flicking through & flipping through

 
 
maxdancona
 
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Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 07:55 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

This is the 21st Century, not the 19th.

It's become a cliché how often you Americans use that particular piece of Hollywood to try to make a point about the UK.

Have you ever even visited this country?


Hollywood? You uncultured git!

That was from My Fair Lady, which was based on George Bemard Shaw's classic "Pygmalion". This Broadway hit is one of the most acclaimed and longest running Broadway musicals in history being lauded in both the US and the UK.

(I do apologize for my use of the word "git" which breaks my long-standing rule about not name calling. But the word "git" is one of those quaint Britishisms that are impossible to resist using. )
izzythepush
 
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Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 09:36 am
@maxdancona,
It was filmed in Hollywood.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058385/locations

Broadway is American too.

Neither of which are remotely English.

An American musical based on a play by an Irishman is not at all English.

Uncultured? It's the language of Shakespeare not bloody Broadway you muppet.
maxdancona
 
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Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 10:27 am
@izzythepush,
You don't speak the English of Shakespeare any more than I do... and linguists suggest that my dialect (New England) might be closer to Shakespeare than yours. After the American Revolution, the English in England changed dramatically as people tried to use dialect to climb the social ladder.

The English in the American colonies didn't face the same social pressure, and thus the English language changed less here than it did in England.
izzythepush
 
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Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 10:35 am
@maxdancona,
Unlike you I understand Shakespeare, I remember your loss for words on the Romeo and Juliet thread.

America is a land of immigration the English spoken by early settlers was swamped by non English speakers who learned it as a second language.

That's why you can't pronounce place names like Scarborough correctly. This is how it should be pronounced.



Quote:
the English in England changed dramatically as people tried to use dialect to climb the social ladder.


This is bollocks, dialect is a specific regional type of English, as opposed to standard English. Nobody would have used dialect to climb the social ladder. The notion is ludicrous, and your lack of education is glaringly obvious.
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