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Flicking through & flipping through

 
 
Reply Tue 28 May, 2019 12:40 pm
A British English teacher wrote the following:

My feeling from flicking through Google results is that it is probably used in the same way in the US too in certain specific contexts.

My question is this:

Would the meaning of the sentence have changed if he had written, ".....flipping through......"?

Thank you.
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 375 • Replies: 23
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roger
 
  0  
Reply Tue 28 May, 2019 01:47 pm
@paok1970,
'flipping through' is the normal construction, but I suppose it's use could be confined to physical materials, as opposed to internet images.
Jewels Vern
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 02:42 am
@paok1970,
"Flick" means a push by snapping the finger. "Flip" means to turn over, especially turning a page. No resemblance.
0 Replies
 
cherrie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 02:54 am
@paok1970,
'Flipping through' sounds really wrong to me.
I would definitely say 'flicking through'.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 04:27 am
@roger,
No it's not. Like Cherrie I find it totally weird, it's flicking through.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 03:02 pm
@izzythepush,
Maybe it's just New Mexico, but I have never heard anyone use the expression 'flicking through'.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 03:51 pm
@roger,
Don't you flick through the pages of a book/magazine/newspaper?
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 05:02 pm
@izzythepush,
In the Northeastern US we flip through pages or images. I would never use "flick" in this context, although it does evoke the motion I sometimes use to navigate pages on my phone.

And that's the flipping truth.
0 Replies
 
RedOrchet
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 08:10 pm
@paok1970,
Flicking, flipping... it's all the same. You're reaching the same climax either way.
0 Replies
 
Miss L Toad
 
  2  
Reply Wed 29 May, 2019 09:34 pm
@paok1970,
As you may have gleaned from the responses, flicking (unAmerican english) and flipping (American english) are synonymous terms when used in the fashion you described.

izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 01:29 am
@Miss L Toad,
I live in England, I'm English, I don't speak un-American English I speak English, no modifiers required.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 01:50 am
Cherrie lives in Australia.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 02:33 am
@roger,
It's the arrogance though, you defined your colloquialism as 'normal,' as Miss Toad is defining everything from an American point of view.

Whenever I give advice on English I don't use terms like normal, I say how it's spoken over here.

The language is English, it originated over here by my ancestors, and it's our language that was spread around the globe.

The majority of Americans are descended from people who had English as a second language which probably explains why you can't pronounce English place names correctly.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 03:21 am
@izzythepush,
Talk about arrogance.
Below viewing threshold (view)
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 04:45 am
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 05:32 am


Quote:
An Englishman's way of speaking absolutely classifies him,
The moment he talks he makes some other
Englishman despise him.
One common language I'm afraid we'll never get.
Oh, why can't the English learn to set

A good example to people whose
English is painful to your ears?
The Scotch and the Irish leave you close to tears.
There even are places where English completely
Disappears. In America, they haven't used it for years!

Why can't the English teach their children how to speak?
Norwegians learn Norwegian; the Greeks have taught their
Greek. In France every Frenchman knows
His language fro "A" to "Zed"

The French never care what they do, actually,
As long as they pronounce in properly.
Arabians learn Arabian with the speed of summer lightning.
And Hebrews learn it backwards,
Which is absolutely frightening.
But use proper English you're regarded as a freak.
Why can't the English,
Why can't the English learn to speak?
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 06:58 am
@maxdancona,
This is the 21st Century, not the 19th.

It's become a cliché how often you Americans use that particular piece of Hollywood to try to make a point about the UK.

Have you ever even visited this country?
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 06:59 am
@izzythepush,
I see I've touched a nerve, talk about not being able to handle the truth.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 May, 2019 07:05 am
@maxdancona,
This is more up to date, (and accurate.)

http://viz.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/040_viz_anus.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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