2
   

How closely related, genetically speaking, are different human races ?

 
 
jorm11
 
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 01:05 pm
So how much genetics do different human races (sorry for the word, I couldn't think of something better) have in common ?

I was thinking about if a Caucasian man had a child with a Black woman, would the child have more similar genes to his father compared to the similarity in genes of his father and another Caucasian male ?

If yes, I have another question : would the difference in genes between the child and the father be greater than the difference between the father and his non-twin brother ?
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 01:16 pm
@jorm11,
I heard that there are more genetic differences in a herd of zebra than a group of people chosen at random from all over the World. We're very very similar.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 01:49 pm
@izzythepush,
think about it. Youre as different from someone of another "race" as your mother is different from your father
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 02:53 pm
@farmerman,
I know. I'm always a bit suspicious when people start asking questions about race and genetics.

Is the OP genuinely curious or is he going to start talking about eugenics?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Apr, 2019 05:14 pm
@izzythepush,
we shall have to wait, and to make it interesting, make bets
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2019 01:00 am
@farmerman,
Or he could be one of those who starts a thread only to **** off and never be seen again.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2019 04:49 am
@izzythepush,
we havent heard from gungasnake for a while.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2019 05:19 am
@farmerman,
I think he's returned under the guise of FreedomEyeLove. They certainly sound very similar, both far right, pro Russian, anti Muslim.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2019 05:43 am
@izzythepush,
oh **** hes pulled a JTT/camlok
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2019 06:03 am
@farmerman,
I think so.
0 Replies
 
Pamela Rosa
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2019 08:53 am
@jorm11,
Quote:
12 % of the DNA Differs Amongst Human Races and Populations

The Human Genome Project found all humans to have a 99.9 % similar genetic content and identity, but this is challenged by a new more detailed research suggesting a higher genetic diversity, with further medical and evolutionary implications.

Previous studies focused on analyzing polymorphism (variation) in DNA nucleotidic bases. But the new approach tackled deletions or duplications of code among relatively long sequences of individual DNA and then compared the so-called copy number variations (CNVs) across individuals from different human breeds. This method uncovered a complex, higher-order variation in the code and better explains why some populations or races are vulnerable to certain diseases and respond well to specific drugs, while counterparts swiftly fall sick or never respond to treatment.

Two technical breakthroughs, a faster, accurate sequencing of DNA and a powerful software programme to spot the CNVs allowed the new approach. 1,447 CNVs were located in roughly 2,900 genes, which means around 12 % of the human DNA. "Each one of us has a unique pattern of gains and losses of complete sections of DNA," said Matthew Hurles from Britain's Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. "One of the real surprises of these results was just how much of our DNA varies in copy number. We estimate this to be at least 12 % of the genome."

"The copy number variation that researchers had seen before was simply the tip of the iceberg, while the bulk lay submerged, undetected. We now appreciate the immense contribution of this phenomenon to genetic differences between individuals."

Some missing or duplicated DNA fragments are very large, thus CNVs might have a big impact on gene expression. About 16 % of genes related to disease have been found to possess CNVs, like those involved in the rare DiGeorge, Williams-Beuren and Prader-Willi syndromes or more common schizophrenia, cataracts, spinal muscular atrophy and atherosclerosis. But kidney disease, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and vulnerability to malaria and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which recent research has blamed on single-letter variations in the gene code, are also suspected for CNVs. "The stage is set for global studies to explore anew... the clinical significance of human variation," said Huntington Willard at Duke University in North Carolina.

The new data also shows that our species is so recent that the vast majority of CNVs, around 89 %, was found to be shared among the 269 people belonging to Mongoloid Race (Japanese and Chinese), African Negroid (Yoruba Nigerians) and Caucasoid (of Northern and Western European ancestry). But there are also widespread specific differences in CNVs according to the race and even inside the same race according to population (geographical origin). This means that over 200,000 years or so, natural selection favored subtle variants allowing different humans populations to adapt to their different environments, with specific climate, pathogens, and food resources.

https://news.softpedia.com/news/12-of-the-DNA-Differs-Amongst-Human-Races-and-Populations-40872.shtml
Finn dAbuzz
 
  3  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2019 11:34 am
@jorm11,
If your question is purely academic, I have no answer, but beyond that, what could it possibly matter? The differences in the different "races" are so obviously superficial that only a true racist would focus on them.

0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Apr, 2019 02:12 pm
@Pamela Rosa,
most all of those "differences" are short tandem repeat alleles . No biggy. STR's are fixed alleles from populations that have lived in an area for 10 generations or more. (Like "Inbreeding" in a city if all partners com from within that town.

STR's of Galiciana Polish differ from Prucz"ians". Amish are our best example . Its a fsize of foundation population). In the AMish its 35 original families
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Anti-Aging Compound identified - Discussion by rosborne979
Cloning things - Discussion by rosborne979
It's alive! Artificial DNA controls life - Discussion by edgarblythe
Who is Q? - Discussion by RexRed
New universe of miniproteins - Discussion by edgarblythe
Very ancient ghosts in the African genome - Discussion by Pamela Rosa
Can this happen-Genetics question - Question by Byfenn
 
  1. Forums
  2. » How closely related, genetically speaking, are different human races ?
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/27/2020 at 12:45:12