7
   

Gravitational forces between Earth and the Sun

 
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Feb, 2019 12:06 pm
@rosborne979,
I think you are misunderstanding what the video is saying. But that's ok. This thread kind of bleeds into the philosopher vs scientist discussions.

If the OP is in high school, she can stick with Kepler's laws and assume that the mass of a planet has no significant effect on its orbit. There is a negligible effect of the Sun's wobbling due to the Earth's mass, but for any practical purpose (and most impractical ones) this effect is so close to zero that it can be ignored.



rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Feb, 2019 05:39 am
@maxdancona,
I understand the video perfectly, it was explained very well. I also learned something from this thread, always a pleasure when that happens.
0 Replies
 
Strat1962
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 02:47 pm
@maxdancona,
Thanks for the explanation
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 10:54 pm
The sun does not "wobble" as a result of the mass of the Earth. The mass of Venus is about .95 of that of the Earth, and much closer to the sun. If such an effect were real, it would be Venus, not the Earth, which would effect the star in that manner. But that's bullshit. The Sun is more than 330,000 times as massive as the Earth or Venus. The axial tilt of the star, which is about 7 degrees, is obviously the result of a significant collision in the early history of this star system
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 10:56 pm
@Setanta,
That's very good Setanta. Your ability to parrot things you find on the internet is acknowledged.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 11:05 pm
The "wobble" of the Sun is caused by the sum of all gravitational pulls from all of the planets. Of course each planet pulls from its current direction... when planets line up on one side, the sun accelerates toward them, when they are spread out on different sides, their pulls cancel each other.

The "wobbling" of the sun from the pull of the planets is quite complex.

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 11:05 pm
You are one snotty son of a bitch--but I'll bet you're very happy, because someone is actually paying attention to your pathetic ass. Your Mr. Science routine is bullshit, and I know it, and you know it. Along with several other subjects, that accounts for why so few people talk to you at all.

Bye, bullshit artist.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 11:07 pm
@Setanta,
No Setanta, you are full of ****, not me. I studied physics in a University, I know physics, and I taught physics.

This Physics by google search is a pet peeve of mine. You are just listing science trivia you found on the internet to show how smart you are. I am addressing the question as I would have done for my students.


Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 11:18 pm
As you would have done for your students--except, you don't have any. Astrophysics is a different kettle of fish, and you demonstrate that you are the one who relies on google. While claiming no university education in astrophysics, the solar system and its bodies have been a particular study of mine for more that 25 years. You're the bullshit artist who tries to play Mr. Science on any even remotely scientific topic that comes up. I didn't need to look up the mass of Venus relative to the Earth, nor the axial tilt of the star, because I already knew them.

You're just a pathetic attention whore. Bye, attention whore.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 11:25 pm
@Setanta,
This is a thread about Newtonian Mechanics. The topic is the "Gravitational forces between the Earth and the Sun". Kepler's laws are addressed in high school. So, are Newton's laws and Gravitation which are relevant to this topic. The two body problem (which we discussed and is relevant) is covered in the first year of undergraduate physics.

That is the topic that I addressed. I am assuming from the OP that this is a high school student, the first question deals with Newton's third law which is covered in high school and is pretty important to understand.

I am really truly and fantastically impressed that you know the tilt of the earth... and I am sincerely grateful for you bestowing that random fact upon us. But, this random factoid, however impressive it is, has no relevance to the topic of the thread.
0 Replies
 
nacredambition
 
  0  
Reply Thu 21 Feb, 2019 11:49 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
I am addressing the question as I would have done for my students.



Quote:
If you double the mass of the earth you will double the force between them, however since the mass doubles the amount of force required to maintain the current orbit, they cancel out.

Changing the mass of the earth doesn't impact the orbit.


Class dismissed.

0 Replies
 
 

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