15
   

Journalist Khashoggi’s murder

 
 
RABEL222
 
  2  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 01:20 am
@izzythepush,
We in the u s seem to have become enamored of despots like the leaders of Saudi arabia, Israel, north Korea, Russia, turkey, and china.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 02:16 am
@RABEL222,
I don't think it's all of you, just fart's followers.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2018 02:22 am
@RABEL222,
At least your government isn't putting trade over its own citizens wellbeing.

Quote:
There are signs Foreign Office staff may be close to resolving the case of UK academic Matthew Hedges, convicted of spying in the United Arab Emirates.

The UAE's ambassador in London is due to issue a statement at 10:00 GMT, amid speculation he will talk about progress in the 31-year-old's situation.

On Thursday, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said he had "constructive" talks with his opposite number in the UAE.

Hedges, of Durham University, was jailed for life but denies spying.


https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-46312477

The government has finally been shamed into action, but Hedges should never have gone on trial in the first place.
Lash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 09:30 am
More on Saudi Arabia.

Does the US response to SA hinge completely on the petrodollar?

Is this why every president since Nixon has allowed SA crimes to go unopposed? (Thought to ponder: which SA crimes are not also US crimes?)

A bit:

The basic framework was strikingly simple. The U.S. would buy oil from Saudi Arabia and provide the kingdom military aid and equipment. In return, the Saudis would plow billions of their petrodollar revenue back into Treasuries and finance America’s spending.

It took several discreet follow-up meetings to iron out all the details, Parsky said. But at the end of months of negotiations, there remained one small, yet crucial, catch: King Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud demanded the country’s Treasury purchases stay “strictly secret,” according to a diplomatic cable obtained by Bloomberg from the National Archives database.

Special Report: Where Next for Saudi Arabia?

With a handful of Treasury and Federal Reserve officials, the secret was kept for more than four decades—until now. In response to a Freedom-of-Information-Act request submitted by Bloomberg News, the Treasury broke out Saudi Arabia’s holdings for the first time this month after “concluding that it was consistent with transparency and the law to disclose the data,” according to spokeswoman Whitney Smith. The $117 billion trove makes the kingdom one of America’s largest foreign creditors.

Yet in many ways, the information has raised more questions than it has answered. A former Treasury official, who specialized in central bank reserves and asked not to be identified, says the official figure vastly understates Saudi Arabia’s investments in U.S. government debt, which may be double or more.

The current tally represents just 20 percent of its $587 billion of foreign reserves, well below the two-thirds that central banks typically keep in dollar assets. Some analysts speculate the kingdom may be masking its U.S. debt holdings by accumulating Treasuries through offshore financial centers, which show up in the data of other countries.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2016-05-30/the-untold-story-behind-saudi-arabia-s-41-year-u-s-debt-secret





Lash
 
  0  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 09:43 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

At least your government isn't putting trade over its own citizens wellbeing.


Quite right. Our government is putting the gross enrichment of an elite class called ‘lawmakers’ over its own citizens’ well-being.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 09:48 am
@Lash,
It's the fossil fuels lobby you need to be worried about.
Lash
 
  0  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 11:03 am
@izzythepush,
I see French people are in the street about it today.

https://abc7.com/amp/society/french-protesters-angry-over-fuel-taxes-clash-with-police/4753619/?__twitter_impression=true

I’m too furious about people dying because they can’t afford medication. Gas in cars can take second billing this week—although, being owned by Saudi Arabian thugs is becoming peskier by the day.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 11:14 am
@izzythepush,
We are Jamal Khashoggi’s daughters. We promise his light will never fade.
Quote:
By Noha Khashoggi and
Razan Jamal Khashoggi, November 23
[Noha Khashoggi and Razan Jamal Khashoggi are the daughters of Jamal Khashoggi.}

Jamal Khashoggi was a complex man, but to us, his daughters, he was simply “Dad.” Our family has always been proud of his work, and we understood the awe and grandeur with which some people viewed him. But in our lives, he was “Baba” — a loving man with a big heart. We loved it when he took us every weekend to the bookstore. We loved looking through his passport, deciphering new locations from pages covered with exit and entry stamps. And we loved digging through the years of musty magazines and newspaper clippings that surrounded his desk.

As children, we also knew our father as a traveler. His work took him everywhere, but he always returned to us with gifts and fascinating stories. We would stay up nights wondering where he was and what he was doing, trusting that no matter how long he was gone, we would see him again, wide-armed, waiting for a hug. As bittersweet as it was, we knew from a young age that Dad’s work meant that his reach extended far beyond our family, that he was an important man whose words had an effect on people over a great distance.

Throughout our lives, it was common for people to stop us on the street to shake hands with Dad, telling him how much they valued and appreciated him. To many, our father was more than just a public figure — his work touched their lives powerfully and resonated with them personally. And it still does.

We grew up with our parents’ love of knowledge. They took us to countless museums and historical sites. While driving from Jiddah to Medina, Dad would point out different areas and tell us their historical significance. He surrounded himself with books and always dreamed of having more. And in all he read, he never discriminated, fully absorbing every opinion. His love of books taught him to form his own thoughts. He taught us to do the same.

His life was a series of unexpected twists and turns, and we were all on the same ride. Not many people can say they got fired from the same job twice a few years apart, as Dad was as the editor in chief of the Al-Watan newspaper. But no matter what happened, he was an optimist, seeing every challenge as a new opportunity.

Dad certainly had a pragmatic side, but in his dreams and ambitions, he was always striving for a utopian version of reality. This, we suppose, is what inspired his critical nature. It was vitally important to him to speak up, to share his opinions, to have candid discussions. And writing was not just a job; it was a compulsion. It was ingrained into the core of his identity, and it truly kept him alive. Now, his words keep his spirit with us, and we are grateful for that. They say, “Here was a man who truly lived life to the fullest.”

When we were in Virginia during Ramadan, Dad showed us the world he had built for himself over the past year. He introduced us to friends who welcomed him and showed us the places he frequented. Yet as comfortable as he had made his surroundings, he still spoke about how he longed to see his home, his family and his loved ones.

He also told us about the day he left Saudi Arabia, standing outside his doorstep, wondering if he would ever return. For while Dad had created a new life for himself in the United States, he grieved for the home he had left. Throughout all his trials and travels, he never abandoned hope for his country. Because, in truth, Dad was no dissident. If being a writer was ingrained in his identity, being a Saudi was part of that same grain.

After the events of Oct. 2, our family visited Dad’s home in Virginia. The hardest part was seeing his empty chair. His absence was deafening. We could see him sitting there, glasses on his forehead, reading or typing away. As we looked at his belongings, we knew he had chosen to write so tirelessly in the hopes that when he did return to the kingdom, it might be a better place for him and all Saudis.

This is no eulogy, for that would confer a state of closure. Rather, this is a promise that his light will never fade, that his legacy will be preserved within us. Baba said it best: “Some depart to remain,” which rings true today. We feel blessed to have been raised with his moral compass, his respect for knowledge and truth, and his love.

Until we meet again in the next life.

0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 11:16 am
@Lash,
Lash wrote:

I’m too furious about people dying because they can’t afford medication.


It's the system you voted for, we voted to get rid of it in 1945. You didn't.
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 11:51 am
@izzythepush,
I voted for universal healthcare, rejection of the war machine, and a return to FDR’s policies.


izzythepush
 
  3  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 11:54 am
@Lash,
You seemed quite happy about people not being able to pay for medicine when you voted for Bush. Why are you bothered about it now?
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 12:13 pm
@Lash,
Lash wrote:
I voted for universal healthcare ... and a return to FDR’s policies.
FDR chose health insurance not to be part of Social Security.
edgarblythe
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 12:15 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Hence, the word "and" at the sentence middle.
0 Replies
 
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 01:00 pm
@izzythepush,
“quite happy about people not being able to afford medicine”? No, that never described me. It was a different world from my 80s perspective.

Some facts have changed. My perspective has also changed.

For instance, I didn’t know anyone who couldn’t afford medicine and doctor visits then. I do now.

Refreshing my memory, the alternative wasn’t that great.
https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/2000-democratic-party-platform

Nobody knows what a Gore presidency would have included, but saber-rattling was present in his platform document—toward Iran and Saddam. Talk of thugs was included in his tough prison outline.

Do know that I am who I am and was who I was, and though hindsight might have altered some decisions, I move forward, interested in the pageant, throwing rocks when compelled.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 01:22 pm
@Lash,
There was plenty of poverty back in the 80s. You were younger then, your friends were younger, you didn't need as much medicine back then. That's what's changed, not the system.

Enough of the bullshit. You've attacked the 'socialised medicine of the NHS and deliberately misrepresented the NHS staff taking industrial action. Despite being told repeatedly it was about funding you attacked the system, one of the most cost effective systems in the btw, because you're only bothered about UHC when it applies to you.
Lash
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 01:32 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

There was plenty of poverty back in the 80s. You were younger then, your friends were younger, you didn't need as much medicine back then. That's what's changed, not the system.
Quote:
Life experience is very likely a large part of my change in perspective. That, and the fact that the gulf between haves and have-nots has grown.


Enough of the bullshit. You've attacked the 'socialised medicine of the NHS and deliberately misrepresented the NHS staff taking industrial action. Despite being told repeatedly it was about funding you attacked the system, one of the most cost effective systems in the btw, because you're only bothered about UHC when it applies to you.
Quote:
You intentionally misrepresent me, yet again. There was great difficulty obtaining services in England, globally reported. I referred to that fact as a
concern.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 01:52 pm
@Lash,
No you didn't you attacked the system. You said NHS workers were protesting against the system not lack of funding. Despite being corrected by me you kept on repeating the lie.

There's nothing wrong with my memory.
Lash
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 02:13 pm
@izzythepush,
Well. I suppose you can prove it easily with my quote...
Otherwise, yet another baseless claim.
edgarblythe
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 24 Nov, 2018 02:25 pm
Trump’s Amoral Saudi Statement Is a Pure Expression of Decades-Old “U.S. Values” and Foreign Policy Orthodoxies

https://theintercept.com/2018/11/21/trumps-amoral-saudi-statement-is-a-pure-and-honest-expression-of-decades-old-u-s-values-and-foreign-policy-orthodoxies/
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Nov, 2018 03:45 am
@Lash,
Because I've got nothing better to do than run around after you pointing out your lies. We both know the truth, if you don't have the courage to stick by your words that's something else entirely.

Remember when I did show a load of your posts espousing right wing ideology just for you to make a load of lame excuses?

I have a life.
 

 
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