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Bring out your random thoughts here! Bring out your random thoughts here!

 
 
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 06:03 am
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 849 • Replies: 23
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edgarblythe
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 08:37 am
Wampum for wampum
You can't beat a Pontiac
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 10:09 am
@edgarblythe,
Should you get a pilot's license to drive a Honda Pilot?
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 10:41 am
MapQuest really needs to start their directions on #5. Pretty sure I know how to get out of my neighborhood.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 12:13 pm
With all this plant breeding going on, why hasn't somebody just developed grass which grows only two inches high and then stops, so we don't have to mow it?
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 04:13 pm
Helen of Troy's face may not have been so pretty, after it launched a thousand ships.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 05:33 pm
@Blickers,
Blickers wrote:
With all this plant breeding going on, why hasn't somebody just developed grass which grows only two inches high and then stops, so we don't have to mow it?

This may be an urban legend, but I've heard that they have, and the lawn mower interests bought it out to prevent it from going public.

There may be environmental concerns if such a thing ever did become widely used. Would it become an invasive species that would displace taller grass in the wild, to the detriment of the environment?
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 05:53 pm
@oralloy,
Sounds like a variation on the old carburetor rumor, where somebody invented a carburetor which gave you twice the gas mileage as the standard carb, but the oil companies bought the patent then killed it. Anything is possible, of course. But even if that happened with the grass, somebody else could take some other grass seed and breed it into that combo as well. Probably a near- infinite number of crosses you can use.

As far as being an invasive species, I imagine that you can breed non-invasiveness into the product as well. If we can grow miniature trees and miniature bushes, why not miniature grass?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 05:55 pm
@Blickers,
They bought up the street car lines and dismantled those, so it's a thought.
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 05:57 pm
@edgarblythe,
Is that true? The auto companies bought up all the trolley lines?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Apr, 2018 06:11 pm
@Blickers,
It's in part urban legend, in part true.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Motors_streetcar_conspiracy
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2018 01:42 pm
I wish Marvel wouldn't be so secretive about whether or not they are producing Infinity War in 4K.

I'd rather forgo 3D* and see it in 4K on a giant screen if that is available.

If 4K isn't available I might as well see it in 3D on a smaller screen.

If I forgo 3D for no reason and end up watching 2K smeared across a screen that is way too large for it, I'm not going to be happy.

If 4K is available on a giant screen and I miss out on it, I'm not going to be happy.


*Only Laser IMAX does 3D and 4K at the same time. Since there are no such theaters in Michigan, I have to choose either one or the other.
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2018 03:42 pm
Five years ago there were news stories that said the supply of chocolate would run out in five years. It's five years later and there still seems to be plenty. What happened?

Frankly, I was looking forward to seeing all the chocolate junkies writhing on the sidewalk and hallucinating. Very disappointed.
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2018 08:47 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
*Only Laser IMAX does 3D and 4K at the same time. Since there are no such theaters in Michigan, I have to choose either one or the other.

Actually not even Laser IMAX I guess.

Their projectors are capable, but Hollywood doesn't make any movies that are simultaneously 3D and 4K. If a movie is available in both 3D and 4K, they are two separate versions of the movie.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  0  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2018 08:49 pm
@Blickers,
Well yes, but their prediction ignored one small variable. That would be five years of current production.
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2018 09:53 pm
@roger,
The articles at the time supposedly covered that. Apparently chocolate trees can only grow along riverbanks, require shade from other trees, and once you plant them it takes a lot of time for them to begin yielding, or something. The gist of the articles was that there was no way they could increase production to meet anticipated demand.

I'm not one who can resist a good disaster scenario, and so I was looking forward to the fights in the streets over chocolate bars. Alas, they never happened. Damn.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Apr, 2018 01:21 am
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Apr, 2018 06:04 am
@Blickers,
https://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/25/opinion/25rosenblum.html

CHOCOLATE, sweet as it is, has set off bitter conflict since even before the conquistadors found Aztecs killing one another over cacao beans. It split families and estranged friends in the candy business to such a degree that when a Cadbury walked into a funeral for a rival he had done wrong, the widow shouted across Westminster Abbey, “Get out, devil!”

The Hershey and Mars dynasties fought legendary wars — internecine and with each other — for much of the 20th century. Now what big-time candy men had hoped would sneak by as a simple rule change has erupted into a food fight that will go far to define how America values culinary pleasure.

Real chocolate is made from crushed cacao beans, which provide not only solid cocoa mass but also cocoa butter that is vital to texture because, quite literally, it melts in your mouth. Industrial confectioners have petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to be able to replace cocoa butter with cheaper fats and still call the resulting product “chocolate.” The reason: the substitution would allow them to use fewer beans and to sell off the butter for cosmetics and such.

Advocates of substitution claim Europeans already do this. That comparison, whether a misunderstanding or an effort to mislead, is absurd.


When European companies tried to cut cocoa butter, the debate dragged on for a decade. In 2003, the European Union ruled that substitution had to be limited to 5 percent and only by a few specific oils that chemically resemble cocoa butter. This faux chocolate is clearly labeled “contains vegetable fats in addition to cocoa butter” — and is shunned by purists. The French like to call it “cocholat,” an epithet derived from their word for pig, cochon.

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In America, the Food and Drug Administration can act swiftly to change rules based on what it calls a citizen’s petition. Last year, “citizens” like the Grocery Manufacturers Association added new guidelines for chocolate onto an omnibus petition covering more than 200 foods that called for, among other things, altering food standards to “permit maximum flexibility in the food technology used to prepare the standardized food” and to allow “any alternative process that accomplishes the desired effect.”

This could have sweeping effects on food manufacturing overall; for chocolate in particular, the guidelines provide for no effective limit on how much cocoa butter can be substituted nor restrictions on what fats can be used. There is no attempt to mimic the real thing.

This might have passed unnoticed had a California chocolate maker, Gary Guittard, not banged the alarm. He rallied opposing forces; the F.D.A. extended its comment period to today. The agency says it isn’t making any immediate decision.

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As word of the chocolate petition spread in Europe, Old World masters reacted predictably. They had watched Americans finally catch on to the wonders of cacao, and are appalled at the idea that this could all be lost. As Jacques Genin, whose unmarked one-room Paris factory is a holy site for connoisseurs, said, everyone has a right to the joy of chocolate — and if most chocolate on the shelves is fake, only those who can afford creations like Mr. Genin’s will know how wonderful it is.

His fears are echoed among chocolatiers in France, Belgium, Italy and Spain as well as in the United States. And those fears are real.

The proposal would widen the gap between good and awful. Industrial food companies could sell their waxy cocholat for less. But purveyors of the real thing have no corners to cut. While discerning chocoholics will fork over whatever it takes, those who can’t pay will never know chocolate.

Proponents cloud the issue with dubious claims. Some say, for instance, the change would help growers and African children who toil for a pittance in cacao fields, without explaining exactly how. But in fact, it would lower the demand for beans.

When Americans learned to love olive oil, growers improved quality. In the same way, a chocolate revolution put a premium on better beans. But 90 percent of cacao farmers barely scratch by. They would suffer from lower demand, and so would their product.

Too much of what we eat is already ersatz-virtual, like “farm-fresh” Frankenstein produce or “home-baked” chemical cookies. No one who has savored real chocolate can be eager to see our beloved Theobroma cacao, the elixir of the gods, suffer this fate.

0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  2  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2018 01:46 am
Last week my Firefox browser announced to me that they have the winners in their contest for cool new add-ons.

http://blog.mozilla.org/firefox/great-new-web-extensions

I was "meh" on most of them, but intrigued by the "Worldwide Radio" one, so I installed it.

After a week of not paying attention to it, I decided to look it over just now.

They have KNAC!

For those who don't know, that's a legendary heavy metal station out of Los Angeles from back in the day.

So now I'm playing KNAC directly from my browser toolbar. Very Happy

The add-on has an internal bookmark feature so I can easily bring up KNAC every day now.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 May, 2018 06:18 am
@oralloy,
Do they have WBCN?
 

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