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Grammar rule...

 
 
Seizan
 
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 02:51 pm
In general...

You can be on a team, but not in a team.

You can be in a group, but not on a group.

What is the grammatical rule for proper use of in / on for such cases?
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 1,108 • Replies: 10
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centrox
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 03:10 pm
@Seizan,
Seizan wrote:
What is the grammatical rule for proper use of in / on for such cases?

There is no general 'rule' .In the case of teams, this is true:

On a team: mainly American English.
In a team: mainly British English.
In a group... correct in American and British English.
On a group: incorrect in any variety of English.

chai2
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 04:12 pm
@centrox,
Do you say take a bath or have a bath centox?

Even though I'm used to it, I don't understand why Americans say they go to school, but not to "the" school, yet we say we go to "the" hospital. It's noticeable to my ears when you say you "went to hosptial"

centrox
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 04:45 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
Do you say take a bath or have a bath centox?

Even though I'm used to it, I don't understand why Americans say they go to school, but not to "the" school, yet we say we go to "the" hospital. It's noticeable to my ears when you say you "went to hospital"[/quote]

Oddly enough, I think I generally say have a bath but take a shower. We Brits might say go to the hospital if we mean the building, e.g. to work or visit a patient, but we go in or into hospital for medical treatment, and we are in hospital while that is happening, and then we are out of hospital. You might say the same about prison. Incidentally, in Britain, "jail" and "prison" mean the same thing.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 04:59 pm
@centrox,
Just a personal feeling; if I say I'm going to school, that sort of means I'm a student. If the school is serving as a meeting place for a non school purpose, I would say we were meeting at the school.
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chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 05:59 pm
@centrox,
centrox wrote:

Incidentally, in Britain, "jail" and "prison" mean the same thing.



Interesting.

So if someone was drunk, got in a fight and was taken in for the night for being disorderly you might call it being in prison?

I might not be 100% correct by definition, but my take on it is that jail is for more minor things, and prison for serious offenses.

In the game Monopoly, you can get a "get out of jail free" card, but not a "get out of prison" card.

Funny words are.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 06:05 pm
@chai2,
Oh!

I just thought of something regional here in the States.

Where I grew up, in the NE, we would say we "went to a bar". What you call a pub.

When I started meeting people from at least parts of the Midwest, like Michigan, or when I lived in Wisconsin, they said "went to the bar"

I would only say "the" if I was naming a specific bar.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 08:27 pm
@chai2,
Cities and counties have jails, in the US. Prisons are state and federal accommodations used when confinement is over one year.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jan, 2018 10:33 pm
@roger,
I think of jail as where Otis Campbell would spend the night and Aunt Bea would bring him breakfast in the morning.

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centrox
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jan, 2018 01:57 am
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:
So if someone was drunk, got in a fight and was taken in for the night for being disorderly you might call it being in prison?

Police stations have cells where people can be kept for up to 24 hours before being charged or released. This is not seen as being in jail or prison. A minor drunkard might be sent home without charge after sobering up. If, after 24 hours, you are taken before magistrates and they decide you need to be kept in custody (there has to be a good reason) you can be "remanded" until your trial. In this case you would be kept in a prison. Prisoners on remand are treated as if they are not guilty and have more rights than convicted prisoners; they can wear their own clothes and vote. However they would be said to be "in prison" or "in jail", but not "jailed", which is what happens when you receive a prison sentence after conviction in a court.

layman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Jan, 2018 02:27 am
@centrox,
0 Replies
 
 

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